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How to handle problems with gunsmith?

 
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  #8  
Old 11-02-2013, 05:33 AM
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Re: How to handle problems with gunsmith?

How about some pics of the bedding, top and bottom...
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  #9  
Old 11-05-2013, 09:40 PM
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Re: How to handle problems with gunsmith?

If the rings you are seeing at the muzzle are in both the bore and the groove, it's likely they are button marks from the rifling process, you may have not seen this before because you had not scrutinized the barrel in the past (or the lapping could have cleaned away some long term fouling that has been covering these marks from view). If the barrel was indeed lapped, the frosting you see in the muzzle is likely from reversing the lap in the bore, best to cut an inch off the muzzle after the lapping- not possible with your front sight in place.
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Old 11-08-2013, 10:18 AM
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Re: How to handle problems with gunsmith?

No offense but that barrel is junk and probably was before you had the work done. That's why I don't do general gunsmithing because all kind of problems are found once you get them apart. I would have told you to re barrel the gun and prob change the stock but that ususlly takes six months.

Send some pics of that bedding job.
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  #11  
Old 11-08-2013, 11:50 AM
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Re: How to handle problems with gunsmith?

That end means nothing. It's the other end thats important (from the pictured scratches in the finish, I'd say she had a hard life anyway......

You don't wait until it's almost hunting time to dissect a piece. You do that stuff in the spring..... just say'in.

Hunting time is time to put farming equipment in the barn (after servicing of course). Equipment don't 'break in the barn' and that applies to guns as well.
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  #12  
Old 11-08-2013, 02:06 PM
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Re: How to handle problems with gunsmith?

You tell 'em old timer!!....
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  #13  
Old 11-08-2013, 05:23 PM
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Re: How to handle problems with gunsmith?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sully2 View Post
You tell 'em old timer!!....
Past timer actually....

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  #14  
Old 11-09-2013, 09:45 AM
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Re: How to handle problems with gunsmith?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SidecarFlip View Post
That end means nothing. It's the other end thats important (from the pictured scratches in the finish, I'd say she had a hard life anyway......

You don't wait until it's almost hunting time to dissect a piece. You do that stuff in the spring..... just say'in.

Hunting time is time to put farming equipment in the barn (after servicing of course). Equipment don't 'break in the barn' and that applies to guns as well.


+1

I will not take sides because I have not heard both sides of the story.

From my point of view - I always inspect the rifle very well and tell the customer the hard truth
as to what it needs or what is wrong with it. The smith should have made it clear, based on what
I see, that it was a waist of time and he should have made that clear.

From the clients perspective- If you don't know, you just have to take the smiths word for it and sometimes this can be risky . So I tell everyone that I deal with the truth as I see it and that they will not offend me if they go to another smith for a second opinion.

Often money is a big issue and the smith needs to explain that sometimes it is best to cut your losses and buy a new rifle or try to find a load that will work best in the rifle and just limit the distance you use it. rather than spend a lot of money and end up with very little more than you had.

Quality smithing takes time and should be considered when planning a new build or simply repairing
a used rifle. So I agree with Sidecarflip about planning well ahead of hunting season.

A good project requires a good understanding of the work, cost, schedule and planning to be successful and fun. poor planning only leads to a poor outcome.

To the poster- Try to work out your problems with the smith as best you can, if you can't, pull the plug and go somewhere else.

My recommendations are more for the future projects you and others are planning and not for this one (The mistakes have already been made and all you can do at this point is make the best of it).

I hope it all works out for you and does not leave you with bad feelings toward other gunsmiths
that would have handled it better or at least told you the truth in the beginning so the choice would have been yours.

Just some comments

J E CUSTOM
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