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Glass Bedding Recoil Lug Treatment

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  #1  
Unread 03-14-2009, 06:06 PM
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Glass Bedding Recoil Lug Treatment

I plan to glass bed my 700 action into a woodstock and don't remember the taping process for the recoil lug. Two layers on the front and one layer on the back, side, and bottom edges seemed to be what I remember, but memory is not to reliable sometimes. Appreciate advice on this matter? Thanks in advance.
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  #2  
Unread 03-14-2009, 06:10 PM
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Re: Glass Bedding Recoil Lug Treatment

Tape the sides,bottom, and front only, no tape on the side that faces the reciever.
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  #3  
Unread 03-14-2009, 06:43 PM
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Re: Glass Bedding Recoil Lug Treatment

I use 10 mil pipe tape. Clean and degrease the lug good so the tape sticks. Start on the top of the lug and wrap one time around the circumference of the lug, I don't tape the front. Trim with a razor blade and your good to go. Don't forget the release agent
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  #4  
Unread 03-14-2009, 08:41 PM
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Re: Glass Bedding Recoil Lug Treatment

I do same as Cowboy.
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  #5  
Unread 01-22-2016, 03:20 PM
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Re: Glass Bedding Recoil Lug Treatment

Resurrecting this thread in the hopes of receiving some additional feedback. What is the current consensus on taping the bottom, front, and sides of a recoil lug prior to setting the barreled action into the bedding compound?

Having researched this topic, it seems that virtually everyone recommends taping the bottom of the recoil lug in order to leave an air gap there. And I understand that rationale.

Most recommend taping the front of the recoil lug. I see Kevin Cram doesn't. I've developed two considerations related to taping the front of the recoil lug. 1) On a heavy recoiling rifle equipped with a muzzle brake, wouldn't the air gap in front of the muzzle brake allow the barreled action to shift forward in the stock after each shot? Is this going to be a negative on rifle accuracy? 2) Folks that recommend taping the front of the recoil lug contend that this is advantageous because it allows the barreled action to return to a consistent position - shot after shot. Consistent "return to battery" position is the phrase I've read. But I wonder if this practice is the same for a braked muzzle versus a barreled action without any muzzle brake.

Tapping the sides of the recoil lug seems to generate the least agreement. Some don't tape the sides of the recoil lug because they want the sides of the lug in direct contact with the bedding material in order to resist the rotational torque associated with bullet launch - particularly with heavier, larger caliber cartridges. Many do tape the sides of the recoil lug, but I've not read much about the reason for relieving the sides of the recoil lug - other than it makes it easier to remove and re-install the barreled action from the stock in the future.

I'm going to be bedding a BAT HR action with integral recoil lug in Devcon in the near future, for a .338 Lapua Improved. Any opinions and recommendations on the taping of the recoil lug in a McMillan stock would be appreciated.
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  #6  
Unread 01-22-2016, 03:42 PM
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Re: Glass Bedding Recoil Lug Treatment

You want opinions, here is mine.

You don't want tape on the back of your recoil lug.

The recoil lug on your BAT HR action is tapered, so you don't want tape on the sides of it. On actions that have straight lugs, I would want to tape at least one side of the lug.

You want some tape on the bottom of the lug, I would use a layer .020" thick.

The front of the recoil lug needs some tape too. You need enough clearance in front of the recoil lug for the barreled action to lay in the stock channel, with the barrel touching the stock and the back of the action tipped up, without having the recoil lug being a pry bar on the bedding. So the amount of clearance you have under your barrel and the length of the lug will determine how much clearance you need. It won't take much.
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  #7  
Unread 01-22-2016, 03:49 PM
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Re: Glass Bedding Recoil Lug Treatment

P, you'll more than likely have a variety of responses on this subject. There isn't a general consensus on where to tape the lug as well many variations on how far foreward to take the epoxy. My method is therefore of no use since many responders will have their own take. Perhaps the input of a master gunsmith could steer you to the best method and most importantly explain why. I was fortunate to have the opportunity to sit and observe a custom rifle builder for 11 years prior to his untimely passing. Good luck with the .338 LI
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