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First Build Questions

 
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  #8  
Old 08-12-2012, 02:54 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 29
Re: First Build Questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by J E Custom View Post
It should be better than a factory rifle because of the truing,lapping, trigger and a custom barrel
with a good chamber and stock.

Plus a proper bedding and a good head space, should all add up to a good rifle and a lot more
experance and knowledge of what it takes to make an accurate rifle.

Most Gunsmiths started just trying to accurize factory rifles and learned the in's and out's
of many different rifles before starting to build rifles from scratch.

J E CUSTOM
Thanks a lot!
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  #9  
Old 08-13-2012, 11:37 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 2,608
Re: First Build Questions

I do believe there is value in learning to accurize factory rifles. But, true custom rifles built by qualified smiths are not just a bunch of components screwed together.

I responded to Antler's pm, but thought it might be worth posting...

JMHO FWIW...

Quote:
Sorry. I didn't mean to sound negative.

Savage makes many different models with varying price tags. I believe you can even custom order to your liking.

Some models have cheapo stocks and some are actually pretty good.

Many claim to get custom rifle accuracy with their off-the-shelf Savages. ...though Savage doesn't guarantee specific accuracy that I know of and all of the high volume producers turn out hummers and a few lemons.

Removing one barrel from a factory action and sticking another pre-threaded and pre-chambered barrel on the same unmodified action isn't necessarily going to improve anything.

Good after-market barrels often may or may not shoot tighter groups. The main advantages are often holding accuracy for long shot strings (20 or more) and easier cleanup.

As such, you can spend a lot on customizing and have no real gain in accuracy.

But, there is satisfaction in building your rifle to suit yourself.

The great news with Savage is you can do this yourself with relatively few tools and a bit of research and care. However, there's no particular advantage/disadvantage for a smith who guarantees performance since he's going to chuck it all up in a lathe and true/blueprint the whole thing anyways to ensure the desired end result.

The rifle is just a small part of a long range shooting system. Optics, reloading tools, range finders, etc... and of course, practice... all add up.

Hope this helps.
-- richard
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  #10  
Old 08-13-2012, 10:22 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 29
Re: First Build Questions

Thanks for the PM and replies. I understand the point your trying to make and I agree to that.

I'm not trying to put together a rifle that will compete with a $5000 rig in competitions. I really liked the Tikka T3 TAC in .223. I would rather 22-250 over .223 for coyote hunting but that rifle is only made in .223 and .308 and is $1800.

That got me thinking that if I can do some research I can put together a rifle myself. Instead of spending $2k to buy and ship (rare gun here) I'd buy the pieces and put ons together for around the same cost, I'd get the caliber I wanted and hopefully it's a superior shooter.
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  #11  
Old 08-14-2012, 01:02 AM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 55
Re: First Build Questions

I did exactly what you are talking about. I had a Savage chambered in .308 Win. and wanted to build a hunting/target rifle.

After a ton of research and brain picking from people way more knowledgable than I, I decided to go for it. I ended up purchasing a Shilen drop in chromoly match grade barrel with a heavy varmint contour. A bell and carlson medalist stock and I used bedrock glass bedding.

The barrel I had installed by a gunsmith, because It was cheaper than buying the gauges and tools to do it myself. Also, as long as the barrel will last I won't be using the tools often enough to want/need to own the tools.

Fitting the stock took a dremel and a few hours of my time. The most time consuming portion was preping the action and stock for the bedding.

So far the rifle has been consistently shooting between quarter and half moa. It has been very rewarding and an eye opening experience. So if you are mechanically inclined I say go for it.
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  #12  
Old 08-14-2012, 08:07 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 29
Re: First Build Questions

Thanks 1SevenZero!

I'm pretty mechanically inclined, but never worked on a firearm before. The only part of this that makes me nervous is bedding. I have a 22 mag I may bed in the meantime for practice. Feel free to PM a few pics of your .308, mind sharing who makes your "drop in" barrel?
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  #13  
Old 08-14-2012, 08:17 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,199
Re: First Build Questions

[QUOTE=rscott5028;684222]I do believe there is value in learning to accurize factory rifles. But, true custom rifles built by qualified smiths are not just a bunch of components screwed together.


+1

Becoming a good gunsmith takes Time, patients,training,skill,attention to detail and a thorough
understanding of cause and effects in able to produce a quality fire arm.

Factory rifles are the most difficult to diagnose and fix because of the parts quality they have.

Almost without exception there parts are not perfict and machining is also not perfict so you
have to find the problem before you can fix it. Swapping parts is not the way to eliminate the
problems.

I would not recomend building a rifle from scratch the first time without this understanding first.
Hence the reason for starting with a savage pre build and using top quality parts.

I personally don't like pre built/chambered barrels but good ones can be found.

If every part is checked for trueness,squareness,fit and finish most problems can be fixed before
assembly and the outcome will be better.

Every Gun Smith started somewhere and grew to there level of competence/acceptance and
some have never stopped learning/improving because of there standards.

Start slow and grow

J E CUSTOM
__________________
"PRESS ON"
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  #14  
Old 08-14-2012, 09:01 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 2,608
Re: First Build Questions

There are tons of articles, you tube videos, and DVDs that show how to bed a rifle.

This one is pretty good if you want to go all out... Stress-Free Pillar Bedding

-- richard
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