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Different lathe..... CNC teach?

 
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  #1  
Old 07-06-2013, 09:00 AM
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Different lathe..... CNC teach?

I posted a while ago aobut trying to go CNC. I have finally moved and had to get rid of my leblond in the process. I am now starting the lathe shopping process again. I am thinking about going with the hybrid CNC teach like a TL1/2 or harrison alpha previously recommended. If I can't find a good used one of those I might have to just go back with a manual lathe.

So in the time since I last asked how many guys have tried the types of lathes I mentioned above?

What are your experiences with the various imports?

If this gets a rant on U.S. vs imports I will just delete the thread. I will stipulate that with a time machine of the correct carrying capacity I would go back 40 years and buy an awesome U.S. steel eating monster.
  #2  
Old 07-06-2013, 12:39 PM
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Re: Different lathe..... CNC teach?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lazylabs View Post
I posted a while ago aobut trying to go CNC. I have finally moved and had to get rid of my leblond in the process. I am now starting the lathe shopping process again. I am thinking about going with the hybrid CNC teach like a TL1/2 or harrison alpha previously recommended. If I can't find a good used one of those I might have to just go back with a manual lathe.

So in the time since I last asked how many guys have tried the types of lathes I mentioned above?

What are your experiences with the various imports?

If this gets a rant on U.S. vs imports I will just delete the thread. I will stipulate that with a time machine of the correct carrying capacity I would go back 40 years and buy an awesome U.S. steel eating monster.
Southwest Trac makes one, and somebody makes one that uses the Prototrac box. I have not seen this conversion in person. But hear it works well. The Southwest machines are fair. Accuarcey is not all that bad, but are not what I'd call overbuilt in anyway. A hard wreck gets expensive. Their chucking system sucks, and recommend buying the optional stuff. If you can find a nice used Clausing, you way ahead in the game. My favorite hand lathe right now is the Colechester. A very well made English built lathe that is surprisingly accurate. If you find a used one, these machines rebuild well.

I agree with you and the time machine! I'd buy a solid state Monarch Series EE with the ten inch chuck, or a tool room grade Monarch hydraulic. Be set for life!
I'd also look for a K&T MM600 machine center, and cut a new action in about thirty minutes everytime I hit cycle start!

By the way the first hand lathe that I ever seriously ran was an American. Not a bad machine. But a few months later I got sent to the tool room. Being the bottom of the totem pole I of course got the lathe that nobody would run! I ended up with a genuine "war finish" LeBlond hand lathe. Nobody ran it much; if at all. Reason why was that the frame was a special casting made for a woman to run! It sat lower to the floor than the other lathes (probably six to eight inches). The Tail stock took some getting used to as it worked backwards. I had no problem holding one thousandth or less with it. The old men I worked with came over to see how I was doing and had a good laugh about it (I had no problems with the low profile). Then the next day they showed up with tools and touched up the compound and the cross slide gibs, and took all the back lash out the lead screws. The old lathe ran like a top, and I was easily holding sizes that the other guys over there thought were impossible on that machine. The following weekend the guy I worked for sent his painters over and had the machine completely repainted in a light grey color (it was actually a funky looking green). It was like getting a brand new machine!
gary

Last edited by Trickymissfit; 07-06-2013 at 12:55 PM. Reason: more data
  #3  
Old 07-06-2013, 12:54 PM
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Re: Different lathe..... CNC teach?

Haas lathes are made in the USA. Look at the TL1. Plenty shops using them.
  #4  
Old 07-06-2013, 08:03 PM
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Re: Different lathe..... CNC teach?

Quote:
Originally Posted by westcliffe01 View Post
Haas lathes are made in the USA. Look at the TL1. Plenty shops using them.
take any Hass machine apart and you'll find that it's assembled here. LeBlond Makino may still make engine lathes in Ohio (they also bought Monarch Sidney in Ohio). But as far as I know the Hardingh bench lathe is all that's left, other than Bardens & Oliver. Hardingh may sell their smaller slant bed lathe with conversational programing. The market is small for tool room quality lathes anymore, as they've largely been replaced by smaller CNC lathes like Okumas. The hottest CNC lathe is a slant bed Hardingh. Nothing will run with them and stay together very long, and nothing has their built in accuracy (24" a minute with a .0005" in a foot accuracy. Pretty much all use the same control these days, and it's a stolen copy of the K&T Gemini.

The best lathe for tool room work, that was also CNC was the older American Panther series. Pretty much like all the others except that it used a differential resolver to setup touch off points as well as new null points. Were not really built very heavy, but for what most people would use them for they were great machines. But on the otherhand they didn't do so well in a production operation. Main issue with them was the clutch packs in the head stock. Not too bad coming apart, but a serious bear to put back together due to they way the set up their spacers
gary
  #5  
Old 07-06-2013, 08:35 PM
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Re: Different lathe..... CNC teach?

Just open your wallet and buy a new Mazak slant bed.

BTW, Haas and Mazak are offering special financing plans now.
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  #6  
Old 07-07-2013, 08:47 AM
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Re: Different lathe..... CNC teach?

I picked up a used Haas TL1 this spring to help speed up my gun making and all I can say is I should have done it sooner. With that said I wouldn't give up my manual 13x40 Clausing/Colchester either, its just to handy to have the manual around.

There are some things I don't like about it but they are mainy related to the fact the I have been using and running production slant beds on my day job and when you get used to all the bells and whistles it is hard to want anything else, but cost for me was the bottom line (if cost wasn't a problem it would have been a Mori Seiki)

As far as using the intuitive, conversational, or teach programming I can't comment on to much, as I use it very little, I mainly write programs for everything I do, probably more out of habit than anything.

Another thing to consider with the Haas is the fact that parts are relitively easy to get and service is available pretty much available anywhere you may live do to the fact that they have a such broad dealer/service network.

If you have any question feel free to PM me.
  #7  
Old 07-07-2013, 08:54 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,614
Re: Different lathe..... CNC teach?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lazylabs View Post
I posted a while ago about trying to go CNC. I have finally moved and had to get rid of my leblond in the process. I am now starting the lathe shopping process again. I am thinking about going with the hybrid CNC teach like a TL1/2 or harrison alpha previously recommended. If I can't find a good used one of those I might have to just go back with a manual lathe.

So in the time since I last asked how many guys have tried the types of lathes I mentioned above?

What are your experiences with the various imports?

If this gets a rant on U.S. vs imports I will just delete the thread. I will stipulate that with a time machine of the correct carrying capacity I would go back 40 years and buy an awesome U.S. steel eating monster.
If you are going to do production machining the CNC is great. if you are going to be gun Smithing
I would recommend going with a REAL good conventional Lathe.

To me the CNC machines require two much set up time for doing a single job. But when it comes to mass producing parts the CNC machine is the ticket.

So in my opinion your intended use would dictate which to get.

Ether way, a good machine is worth the money.

Good Luck

J E CUSTOM
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