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******Cincinnati Lathe ???********

 
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  #36  
Old 05-17-2010, 09:10 PM
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Re: ******Cincinnati Lathe ???********

Nice jig Fitch, it's now in my lathe pic folder!! I like how you kept it short, I've seen some that hang way out there. Also dig the split bushings instead of just pads on the bolts.
Feel free to post any other jigs , I'm thinking of making a reamer pusher like you did or get a Bald Eagle pusher.
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  #37  
Old 05-18-2010, 05:25 AM
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Re: ******Cincinnati Lathe ???********

The PM 12x36 looks like it should work just fine for barrel and receiver work and general machining within it's capacity range. It comes with an impressive list of accessories including a coolant system. I like the totally enclosed gear box. I'd like it better if it had a slower low speed but 65 rpm will work fine for tenon threading and chambering. If it were me, for gun smith work on barrels and receivers I'd rather have the 12x36 with the DRO for the price of the 14x40 with out the DRO.

I see little advantage to a variable frequency drive on a manual lathe - it's expensive, less reliable (more components), and has no benefits beyond rapicly changing the speed setting. Continuous speed variation is not particularely useful and fixed speeds of known rpm have the benefit of being able to accurately calculate cutter speeds so one doesn't over cook things when using HSS bits or drilling. On a CNC where one can program optimal rpm for maximum output variable speed is a feature. On a manual lathe, not so much. And it is a definite disadvantage for metric threading if it can't be plug reversed.

You will have to cross drill and tap the back end of the spindle but that's easy to do.

If you do a lot of metric threading (working on Howas with metric tenon threads for example) you will probably want to convert it to 3 phase. I replaced the single phase motor on my lathe with a 2hp 3 phase motor. Metric threads seldom pickup on the thread dial, one has to leave the lead screw engaged till the threading job is finished, this makes it very very handy to be able to just flip the lathe into reverse and simultaneously give the cross slide a twist to back out the tool, let it motor back to to a starting point, flip it into forward, reset the cross slide and make the next pass. A single phase motor won't reverse if flipped from forward to reverse, it will just keep running in the same direction. One has to wait till the single phase motor slows down enough to engage the start capacitor before it will reverse, and plug reversing like that is very hard on the capacator - the smoke will escape sooner or later ...

I use a dial indicator attached to the ways with a magnet and set it so zero after one turn of the needle around the dial as my stopping point when I'm threading. works great. with a little practice you can stop the threads within a couple thou and don't need to machine a stop groove.

Fitch
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  #38  
Old 05-18-2010, 06:30 AM
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Re: ******Cincinnati Lathe ???********

I've been following this thread from the beginning. I have two Clausing 5900 series lathes in my shop. One is for chambering only and the other is used for trueing, making pillars etc. I've found it very handy to have two lathes that can both use the same tooling. I also found the interview with Mike Walker, in this months Precision Shooting, to be very interesting. Mike is pictured, in his shop, with his old "surplus lathe". It reminded me what Homer Culver told me one time, when I was asking him for advice on what lathe to buy. He said, "It doesn't matter what lathe you buy if, it is tight and true. More depends on the man running it".
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  #39  
Old 05-18-2010, 08:19 AM
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Re: ******Cincinnati Lathe ???********

Fitch, thanks for the post. Posts like that bring a lot of good info to use who need it!!

What ever I buy it WILL have a DRO, that's one good thing for the PM over the Grizz is you can get a DRO install from dealer on the 12x36's. I also like the enclosed gear box.

The variable frequency isn't a big deal to me, I heard that it is awesome to be able to slow it way down or be able to cut at the dead on right speed for the material but I can convert a regular drive to a variable easy enough so maybe it would be better to get it standard drive at first and find out if I even need it or want it. That would save enough money to get the 14x40 and DRO which comes with taper attachment and collet set up. I can slow it down with a pulley change also.

Thanks for the insight on the threading and single phase motor, I was slightly aware of it but I was wondering if you could just use the foot brake and stop it then reverse?
I don't have 3 phase but I'll be helping my father in law build a rotary phase converter to get his lathe up to speed, he's running on a static converter and it is a PAIN.
Adding a spider to the out board shouldn't be a problem.
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  #40  
Old 05-18-2010, 09:17 AM
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Re: ******Cincinnati Lathe ???********

Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieHarren View Post
I've been following this thread from the beginning. I have two Clausing 5900 series lathes in my shop. One is for chambering only and the other is used for trueing, making pillars etc. I've found it very handy to have two lathes that can both use the same tooling. .
You make a good point about having two lathes. My second lathe is the 9" South Bend Model A I inherited from my Dad. He bought it new around 1950, I remember when it came home all shiny and covered in cosmoline or something similar. I make all my pillars for bedding, alignment screws for bedding, and lots of other stuff on it. I replaced the ancient leather flat belt, the original one, with a laced rubber serpentine belt 3 years ago and it made it into a new lathe.

Made these pillars and alignment studs for bedding my '53 Win M70 on it while the 12x36 was set up for chambering:



Nothing that couldn't be done on the 12x36, I just like the convenience and that little lathe is such a pleasure to use.

Fitch
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  #41  
Old 05-18-2010, 09:47 AM
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Re: ******Cincinnati Lathe ???********

Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieHarren View Post
I've been following this thread from the beginning. I have two Clausing 5900 series lathes in my shop. One is for chambering only and the other is used for trueing, making pillars etc. I've found it very handy to have two lathes that can both use the same tooling. I also found the interview with Mike Walker, in this months Precision Shooting, to be very interesting. Mike is pictured, in his shop, with his old "surplus lathe". It reminded me what Homer Culver told me one time, when I was asking him for advice on what lathe to buy. He said, "It doesn't matter what lathe you buy if, it is tight and true. More depends on the man running it".
I hear what your saying, one of the lathes at the auction was a Clausing 5900 and it looked good and went for 1300 dollars but what I knew from the guys running it was it was only capable of tuning within .004 in a 12in pass and the brake was fried and needed a board replaced so I didn't buy it.

I am not going to claim any kind of capability as a machinist so the new one's are very interesting to me as they come with test specs and I can use the Warrenty if they do not meet spec. They are lighter but we're not duing heavy work which I would think would help.
My area is devoid of use macinery, the thought has crossed my mind to just load up the truck and road trip to the mid west and find a good used one there.

Thanks for the input!
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