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Recomendation for BOOTS!!!!

 
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  #8  
Old 01-26-2008, 12:58 PM
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Location: Gila Wilderness,New Mexico
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I go with the 8 inch and I think liners do make a difference... Make sure you don't skimp on the socks... I did for years and when I finally switched to quality Wool Socks I was much happier...

Jason
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  #9  
Old 01-27-2008, 12:33 PM
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Are wool socks more for cold weather. I'm just not familiar with them. Never used em. They sound like they'd be hot. I've allways used the walmart special big ol cotton hunting socks. Do they make wool socks for warm weather?
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  #10  
Old 01-27-2008, 01:38 PM
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Yeah they make some wool blends for warm weather... They are basically really thin on top but you get the padding and wicking on the bottom. Sportsmans has them.

Jason
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  #11  
Old 01-27-2008, 10:45 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Potomac River
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Boots

Every persons foot is shaped differently. It is impossible to recommend a boot because it may not have the correct fit. The usual problem is the heel. The second ususal problem is that the toe box is too short and when going down hill you will jam your toes. For bowhunting I like a soft soled boot and have worn Merrells for many years but now all of their boots are vibram soled but it seems to be a softer vibram than other boot makers.

Goretex is good.
A boot that fits well and is like this would be suitable for moderate backpacking and still decent for bowhunting.

Merrell Radius Mid Waterproof Hiking Boots - Men's from REI.com



socks

For backpacking and serious hiking you should have a moisture control sox and a sockliner for moisture and blister control. You boot must be fittted on with you haveing on the socks you intend to wear to insure proper fit.

Thorlo Backpacking Socks from REI.com

Sock liner

REI CoolMax Liner Socks from REI.com
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  #12  
Old 01-28-2008, 12:57 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Lapeer, MI
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Ok, great! Thanks for the info guys. Now I just have to decide which ones I want.

I've got just one more question.

In breaking in my boots, is there anything that I should NOT do? To me all I do to break them in is whenever I go on a walk or do some scouting I take my new boots. Is there anything else I should be doing while I'm breaking them in? It might be a stupid question but I want to make sure I'm doing everything right because my boots are probably the most important thing for comfort as you all know.

Well thanks again,
You guys are awsome!!!
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  #13  
Old 01-28-2008, 11:12 PM
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Location: Nebraska
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Not so much about breaking in, but I'd make sure if you get leather to put some kind of treatment or protection on them to help preserve the leather. This will prolong the life of the boots and will help to keep them from shrinking too much when put away wet. I've destroyed several pairs of lacers by getting lazy and not taking care of the leather and am trying to rehab an all leather pair of Danners that I left a little long without retreating.
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  #14  
Old 02-01-2008, 06:25 PM
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I just found this on the REI website. It answered my questions about breaking in boots. I thought I'd share it. This was written by the Folks at REI.

"The key to breaking in new hiking boots is to take things slowly. Remember -- your feet aren't as tough as your new boots, so if you rush things, your feet are likely to pay the price.

Different boots will require different amounts of break-in time. Lightweight models may feel perfect right out of the box, while heavier, all-leather models may require weeks to soften up and form to your feet.

NOTE:Most hiking boots stretch out slightly as they break in. But the break-in process will not turn a poor fit into a good one! Make sure the boots you buy feel snug yet comfortable before you take them home.

The basic break-in procedure
Begin by wearing your boots for short periods of time inside the house. Wear the kinds of socks you're likely to be wearing out on the trail. Lace your boots up tight, and make sure your tongues are lined up and the gusset material is folded flat. The creases you form as you break-in your boots will likely remain for the life of the boot.


Your new boots will be a little stiff at first, which is fine. But if you notice significant pinching, rubbing or pain right off the bat, you may want to take the boots back and try a different style.


If after several short indoor sessions your boots seem to fit comfortably, expand your horizons. Wear your new boots to the local store, around town or while working in the yard. Gradually increase the amount of time you spend in your boots and the distances you cover. Make sure your boots feel good at each stage before increasing your distance.

NOTE: Make sure your new boots fit comfortably before you can wear them outside!


Be vigilant throughout the break-in process for any pain or discomfort. As soon as you notice either, take the boots off. Remember -- small problems can become big ones very quickly. If everything feels good, try adding a little weight on your back as you hike, and/or hiking on more challenging trails.


If your boots feel good throughout the break-in process, but a single pinch or a hot spot remains, you may be able to correct the problem area by visiting a shoe-repair shop or your local REI store. Most have stretching devices that can help alleviate localized boot-fitting problems.

No such thing as a "quick fix"
There is no fast and easy method when it comes to breaking in new hiking boots. To do a good job, you have to put in the time.

Avoid "quick-fix" approaches like getting your boots soaking wet then walking long distances. They're too hard on your boots and they'll be murder on your feet. Also make sure you follow the manufacturer's care and water proofing instructions carefully."
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