Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Hunting > Bowhunting


Reply

Draw weight and effective killing distance

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-05-2014, 12:20 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Washington
Posts: 123
Draw weight and effective killing distance

This year I drew the multi-season deer tag for WA state. I have never bow hunted before, and really do not know a lot about bowhunting. I picked up a Bowtech Carbon Knight in a trade, and had it adjusted to fit me. Right now it is set to a 60# draw.

My question to you more season guys, is what is the max distance you can effectively kill a deer with a 60# vs 70# draw?

I know shot placement is everything, and you should get as close as possible, and not shoot beyond what you're capable of...I get all that. Im curious if a 60# draw weight is sufficient enough kill at 60 or 70 yards? I'm trying to work out the limitations of bow, as well as with myself. Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-05-2014, 01:53 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 219
Re: Draw weight and effective killing distance

Quote:
Originally Posted by BearDog View Post
This year I drew the multi-season deer tag for WA state. I have never bow hunted before, and really do not know a lot about bowhunting. I picked up a Bowtech Carbon Knight in a trade, and had it adjusted to fit me. Right now it is set to a 60# draw.

My question to you more season guys, is what is the max distance you can effectively kill a deer with a 60# vs 70# draw?

I know shot placement is everything, and you should get as close as possible, and not shoot beyond what you're capable of...I get all that. Im curious if a 60# draw weight is sufficient enough kill at 60 or 70 yards? I'm trying to work out the limitations of bow, as well as with myself. Thanks!
The bow has far less limitations than the archer. I would limit yourself to 40-50yds and when you are proficient at those ranges consider shooting further. The bow will kill deer at 100yds, but that doesn't mean you can.

The poundage of your bow means very little. Technology today has allowed us to launch arrows out of a 50lb bow that exceeds the velocity of bows that were set at 80lb. So your question about poundage is off key, you should actually be more concerned w/ the energy you are sending down range.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-05-2014, 03:19 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Washington
Posts: 123
Re: Draw weight and effective killing distance

If my question is off key, what variables should I be considering instead? Broadhead or arrow weight, or is this just another one of these "no **** sherlock" lectures? As I said in my original post, I am well aware as a new archer that there are going to be limitations to what I can do. I wouldn't go out having never fired a rifle at 1000 yard and have expectation that I was going to be hitting my target every time. With that being said, if I do have the capability of shooting long distance, I want to make sure my cartridge has enough energy to kill at said distance.

I want to know what the technical limitations of my bow are. Being an alpine hunter, I don't think it is out of the question to strive to be confident enough to make a 70 yard shot. I think it is probably a must. If I can put it in the vitals every time at that distance, I want to make sure that a 60# draw weight (or whatever other gear variables there are) are up to that task. So outside of myself, what should I be considering when it comes to take down power at 70 yards? Right now Im set up with 340 shafts, 100 gr broadheads, and a 60# draw (can go up to 80).
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-05-2014, 03:39 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Northeast
Posts: 2,331
Re: Draw weight and effective killing distance

Quote:
Originally Posted by BearDog View Post
This year I drew the multi-season deer tag for WA state. I have never bow hunted before, and really do not know a lot about bowhunting. I picked up a Bowtech Carbon Knight in a trade, and had it adjusted to fit me. Right now it is set to a 60# draw.

My question to you more season guys, is what is the max distance you can effectively kill a deer with a 60# vs 70# draw?

I know shot placement is everything, and you should get as close as possible, and not shoot beyond what you're capable of...I get all that. Im curious if a 60# draw weight is sufficient enough kill at 60 or 70 yards? I'm trying to work out the limitations of bow, as well as with myself. Thanks!
As teenagers starting out with a 45# Bear recurves back in the 60's we shot numerous deer, most with passthroughs out to 40+ yards. A 60# compound is heavy artillery, even out at 60-70 yards. Sharp broadheads and shot placement trumps poundage.
__________________

"Let us speak courteously, deal fairly, and keep ourselves armed and ready"-T. Roosevelt
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-05-2014, 03:56 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Washington
Posts: 123
Re: Draw weight and effective killing distance

Thanks Greyfox! That an excellent comparison that really puts it into perspective for me.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-05-2014, 04:31 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Good Ol' Oklahoma
Posts: 206
Re: Draw weight and effective killing distance

Kenetic energy of the projectile is what was mentioned in the second post by ohiohunter.

That, really, is the key to killing power with bows (any bow, modern or traditional).

Todays bows are so much better at converting stored energy to kenetic energy, and that is one reason you see bowhunters typically using less bow poundage today than 20-30 years ago.

Real common to see hunters using 62-63 lb bows today vs 80 lb bows back in the 1980's.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-05-2014, 04:33 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Good Ol' Oklahoma
Posts: 206
Re: Draw weight and effective killing distance

Kenetic energy of the projectile is what was mentioned in the second post by ohiohunter.

That, really, is the key to killing power with bows (any bow, modern or traditional).

Todays bows are so much better at converting stored energy to kenetic energy, and that is one reason you see bowhunters typically using less bow poundage today than 20-30 years ago.

Real common to see hunters using 62-63 lb bows today vs 80 lb bows back in the 1980's.

It's really about how much energy you can put into the arrowshaft as it's launched down range. Much like a bullet in a gun, except in the case of an arrow, we rely on a sharp broadhead to do the killing (shot placement is relative here). Kenetic energy comes into play in terms of arrow penetration on certain game like elk.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC