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Blackhorn 209 question

 
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  #36  
Old 12-11-2013, 10:56 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: iowa
Posts: 3
Re: Blackhorn 209 question

What do you think of BH209?

"If your gun doesn't light blackhorn 209, get one that does"--we say.

It is harder to light than other substitutes, but it is worth having a gun that does. It's the single biggest advancement in muzzleloading. Yes, I know that includes the inline from flinklock, the sabot, the 209, etc. My opinion, this is my favorite of the list.

Here's my experience with it regarding weight by volume and accuracy nodes. My Thompson Center measurer, the clear one with the funnel shaped top, throws about +- 2 grains. I have found that to be an intolerable amount, here's why:

I decided to treat my TC omega like a "real rifle" regarding accuracy. I decided this would be a worthwhile venture, as we have seen with shotgun(sabot) slugs, it might matter big time if your gun likes that slug, so the test was on.

I weighed charges from about 98-102 in .7gr increments. Yes, .7 gr increments. The weights are in the high 60's low 70's, which checking my notes was 7 or 300 magnum type numbers. Using that info, I hoped .7 gr would be the right amount. The five groups were fired in round robin fashion until all 5 targets, and therefor load, had a 3 shot group showing. The results were shocking. Same shooter, same gun, same powder, same bullet, same day. Only change was a powder charge from roughly 98-102 gr by volume. The best was a perfect clover leaf, the worst was a 4 inch horizontal spread(scatter node). Just like a "real rifle", arguably more pronounced.
Other details, TC omega, BH209, Hornady SST-ML hi speed lo drag, range 100yds.

The results were enough to warrant more testing to find a larger wider accuracy node. Cool, eh
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  #37  
Old 12-11-2013, 12:27 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: S.E. Michigan
Posts: 3,276
Re: Blackhorn 209 question

Quote:
Originally Posted by focker View Post
What do you think of BH209?

"If your gun doesn't light blackhorn 209, get one that does"--we say.

It is harder to light than other substitutes, but it is worth having a gun that does. It's the single biggest advancement in muzzleloading. Yes, I know that includes the inline from flinklock, the sabot, the 209, etc. My opinion, this is my favorite of the list.

Any inline will ignite 209 so long as the primer ignition channel is a sufficiently large enough diameter....

Here's my experience with it regarding weight by volume and accuracy nodes. My Thompson Center measurer, the clear one with the funnel shaped top, throws about +- 2 grains. I have found that to be an intolerable amount, here's why:

I decided to treat my TC omega like a "real rifle" regarding accuracy. I decided this would be a worthwhile venture, as we have seen with shotgun(sabot) slugs, it might matter big time if your gun likes that slug, so the test was on.

I weighed charges from about 98-102 in .7gr increments. Yes, .7 gr increments. The weights are in the high 60's low 70's, which checking my notes was 7 or 300 magnum type numbers. Using that info, I hoped .7 gr would be the right amount. The five groups were fired in round robin fashion until all 5 targets, and therefor load, had a 3 shot group showing. The results were shocking. Same shooter, same gun, same powder, same bullet, same day. Only change was a powder charge from roughly 98-102 gr by volume. The best was a perfect clover leaf, the worst was a 4 inch horizontal spread(scatter node). Just like a "real rifle", arguably more pronounced.
Other details, TC omega, BH209, Hornady SST-ML hi speed lo drag, range 100yds.

The results were enough to warrant more testing to find a larger wider accuracy node. Cool, eh
Interesting.
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  #38  
Old 12-14-2013, 08:18 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: iowa
Posts: 3
Re: Blackhorn 209 question

I should point out .7 was the conversion factor used for 1gr of volume converted to weight, if that wasn't obviouos.

Also I forgot to add the change in seemingly small increments being "more pronounced" than a real rifle were somewhat expected as anytime in a muzzleloader you change powder charge you also change......seating depth.
Darn, you say, I hate changing 2 variables at once. Me too, but can't help it. Just wanted to add that little bit of info, since the 2 things moving my rifles in and out of accurracy nodes are changed simultaneously in a muzzleloader.

Off to the range
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  #39  
Old 04-14-2014, 04:16 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 24
Re: Blackhorn 209 question

I'm new to mzl shooting so sorry if this is a dumb question but here it goes,
If it states blackhorn 120 v max = 84 grains max charge does that mean the most I should be weighing out on my balance scale is 84 grains?
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  #40  
Old 04-14-2014, 04:49 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: NE Michigan
Posts: 283
Re: Blackhorn 209 question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad615 View Post
I'm new to mzl shooting so sorry if this is a dumb question but here it goes,
If it states blackhorn 120 v max = 84 grains max charge does that mean the most I should be weighing out on my balance scale is 84 grains?
Absolutely YES, you're correct. 84grs WEIGHED is a max charge for production muzzleloaders.
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