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Cast bullets in a 10mm auto

 
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  #1  
Old 03-11-2014, 05:28 PM
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Cast bullets in a 10mm auto

I have a stainless bisley in 45 colt. It's a fine piece but I don't shoot it very much because it's pretty heavy. I've been rolling around the idea of trading it toward a 10mm auto, most likely the Glock 20sf, but I wasn't sure about cast bullets in a 10mm.

I've read post after post about the stopping power of the 10mm with various jacketed bullets. I'd like to use hard cast bullets if for no other reason than cost and what I think would be superior penetration over jacketed bullets. (Opinions welcomed)

Has anyone loaded a 10mm with a good hard cast bullet? I've used Dry Creek bullets in my 45 and love them. I really like them because they're affordable and Lynn is an easy guy to get in touch with who also stands by his products.

I don't cast nor do I see myself starting in the foreseeable future so I'd be buying any cast bullets. Next to quality, available and price are pretty important to me.

Keith
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Old 03-11-2014, 11:34 PM
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Re: Cast bullets in a 10mm auto

Check out bear tooth bullets and double tap bullets. Bear tooth used to make the bullet for double taps 200 grain wide nose gas check load, but double tap now makes their own. You can buy either version from both companies respectively. Like you, we have loaded these based on what we expect for penetration, weight retention. Etc. They are more expensive than the other bullet we load (200 grain Montana gold cmj). But we believe it will be the best thing for a trail load. We are running lone wolf dist. Barrels and had lone wolf modify the chamber so we could use these. Just send them 5 dummy rounds and they will take care of it. Its been a really fun project. Good luck
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Old 03-12-2014, 07:23 AM
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Re: Cast bullets in a 10mm auto

Glock says NOT TO USE CAST BULLETS IN THEIR PISTOLS. They have hexagonal rifling not standard land and groove. The hexagonal rifling is supposed to lead up quickly and will cause much higher presser and danger. I am not sure about the 10mm but you can get after market barrels for their other pistols with land and groove rifling and shoot cast bullets.
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Old 03-12-2014, 08:44 AM
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Re: Cast bullets in a 10mm auto

This is why we are using aftermarket lone wolf barrels as well. Some people shoot lead out of glock barrels but its not worth the chance to me. The lone wolf barrels are around $100 and are very accurate. Money well spent in my opinion. If your going to shoot lead you may want to check them out. We are running the long slide uppers on our 20sf's and absolutely love them.
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  #5  
Old 03-12-2014, 09:12 AM
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Re: Cast bullets in a 10mm auto

I would not recommend shooting cast bullets in any high velocity pistol, (The 10 mm will reach velocities of 1400 ft/sec)

I have/do shoot hard cast bullets and found that velocities of 900+ ft/sec was problematic.

Policemen sometimes practice using cast bullets in there 40 S&Ws at reduced velocities but still
get some leading and have to keep an eye on the barrel condition.

IMO The 10mm auto is just about the most powerful semi auto available that can be carried, and good bullets are a must.

I understand the cost thing but you can buy bulk jacketed bullets fairly cheep and the difference is worth the extra cost.

Just my opinion

J E CUSTOM
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Old 03-13-2014, 04:17 PM
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Re: Cast bullets in a 10mm auto

Quote:
Originally Posted by J E Custom View Post
I would not recommend shooting cast bullets in any high velocity pistol, (The 10 mm will reach velocities of 1400 ft/sec)

I have/do shoot hard cast bullets and found that velocities of 900+ ft/sec was problematic.

Policemen sometimes practice using cast bullets in there 40 S&Ws at reduced velocities but still
get some leading and have to keep an eye on the barrel condition.

IMO The 10mm auto is just about the most powerful semi auto available that can be carried, and good bullets are a must.

I understand the cost thing but you can buy bulk jacketed bullets fairly cheep and the difference is worth the extra cost.

Just my opinion

J E CUSTOM
It all depends on the hardness of the lead. As far as swaged lead bullets JE hits the nail on the head squarely, but with hardcast and gas checked lead you have a totally different animal. I'm driving gas checked hardcast lead at over 1800 fps in my 375h@h with virtually zero leading. I'm also using plain base hardcast lead in my 44 and my 405 win with little to no leading. I get a bit of leading with recycled range lead in my 44 when I want cheap pills, but I throw about anything with lead in it in the pot for those bullets, so even with a cool water quench they are a bit soft. The trick with lead is to get your pressures to the point where the bullet obdurates without blowing the base of the bullet to heck; not too high, not too low. That alone may cause cycling issues in some auto's, but I've never seen it.

Hex rifling isn't a good choice with lead though, no mater the hardness. We had a baby eagle 45 for a spell that shot with lead, but it would lead up more than expected and pressures would rise. A better option for hex rifling is plated bullets.
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Old 03-14-2014, 09:04 AM
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Re: Cast bullets in a 10mm auto

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lefty7mmstw View Post
It all depends on the hardness of the lead. As far as swaged lead bullets JE hits the nail on the head squarely, but with hardcast and gas checked lead you have a totally different animal. I'm driving gas checked hardcast lead at over 1800 fps in my 375h@h with virtually zero leading. I'm also using plain base hardcast lead in my 44 and my 405 win with little to no leading. I get a bit of leading with recycled range lead in my 44 when I want cheap pills, but I throw about anything with lead in it in the pot for those bullets, so even with a cool water quench they are a bit soft. The trick with lead is to get your pressures to the point where the bullet obdurates without blowing the base of the bullet to heck; not too high, not too low. That alone may cause cycling issues in some auto's, but I've never seen it.

Hex rifling isn't a good choice with lead though, no mater the hardness. We had a baby eagle 45 for a spell that shot with lead, but it would lead up more than expected and pressures would rise. A better option for hex rifling is plated bullets.


I absolutely agree with you that It can be done. My question is , Is it worth the trouble and the loss in velocity. Also I have had and seen problems with gas checks and will not use them at all, especially in a semi auto where failures can be catastrophic .

I admit that I am very carful about not taking short cuts or trying to save a little money but sometimes the savings are just not worth it IMO.

In this game, velocity and BCs are king so using hard cast bullets are just not worth it as long as we can still get good jacketed bullets.

I shoot hard cast bullets in my cartridge black powder rifles (Because no one makes 600+ grain bullets for them and load them to 1700 ft/sec+ but I do have to remove the lead fouling after accuracy starts dropping off.

To each his own, Not trying to start an argument, Just my opinion.

J E CUSTOM
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