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Reloading Techniques For Reloading


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What is your sequence?

 
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  #1  
Old 11-09-2010, 11:17 PM
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What is your sequence?

When reloading what sequence do you do it in? My Hornady book says to trim before resizing. Wouldn't that change the overall length? I have a RCBS prep station. What should I put in it and what order should I do it?
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Old 11-10-2010, 12:45 AM
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Re: What is your sequence?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Walker1 View Post
When reloading what sequence do you do it in? My Hornady book says to trim before resizing. Wouldn't that change the overall length? I have a RCBS prep station. What should I put in it and what order should I do it?

Resize before you trim.If you trim before sizing, you will have all your cases at different lenghts.
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  #3  
Old 11-10-2010, 01:10 PM
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Re: What is your sequence?

If I use once fired cases, I first sort them for neck or case wall thickness. Then I'll deprime (by hand) and uniform pockets and flash holes. Then I'll put a light chamfer on the necks (so they go into and out of the die nicely). Next, I'll clean and lube the neck and then neck size the case. Then sort for concentricity or "run out" on the sized neck (maybe not necessary if using a bushing die without the expander ball). Next, trim and chamfer again if needed or sort out extra long and extra short cases. Finally, I'll sort by weight (now that they are all the same exterior dimension due to being fired once and sorted well). I prime by hand and load.

If I am shooting a case that has been loaded more than once, it differs a little. I'll still deprime by hand, but then just brush the pockets clean. Next, lube and FL size the case (if determined necessary). Then tumble to remove lube and trim/chamfer (if necessary). Possibly sort for concentricity/run out on the necks, but sometimes the FL size process will throw alot of cases out of concentricity. Finally, prime and load.

I will neck size as often as I can. When the cases start getting hard to chamber or extract, then I'll FL size. These methods are due to standard press dies. Custom FL dies or arbor press dies or bushing style dies can let a guy get by with less "runout" sorting and then you could FL size every time if you wanted to. The custom dies or bushing dies won't stretch the case as much either. There are alot of different measurments that I make while handloading, but that's a long story.

I've seen alot of cases get stretched a good amount (.010") just by the sizeing process alone, especially FL sizing.........so as mentioned earlier; always size before trimming.

These are just my methods, they work very well for me although quite time consuming in the early stages of brass preperation and sorting.

Last edited by SBruce; 11-10-2010 at 10:53 PM.
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  #4  
Old 11-10-2010, 08:40 PM
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Re: What is your sequence?

Thanks for the info. I thought I was to resize before trimming but wanted to make sure. I did not realize that there is less prep work with cases that have been fired more than once. I will have to make sure to separate those.
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  #5  
Old 11-10-2010, 10:50 PM
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Re: What is your sequence?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Walker1 View Post
Thanks for the info. I thought I was to resize before trimming but wanted to make sure. I did not realize that there is less prep work with cases that have been fired more than once. I will have to make sure to separate those.
There can be less prep work, assuming that the prep work was all done previously and that the cases have been fired in the same rifle thereafter. If you have a bunch of cases and some have been fired more than once, then you might be better off treating the whole lot like never fired or once fired brass. Especially if some were fired in other guns or their origin is unknown.

What I mean is; prep and uniform all of them. FL size all of them if any feel tight in the chamber. Uniform Pockets and Flash Holes on all of them, trim and chamfer all of them, ect. Then you have a whole bunch of cases that are prepped uniformed and ready to go. Once you find your "best load" then it's simple to charge em, seat bullets and have a whole lot of consistent ammo on your shelf to practice and hunt with.
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  #6  
Old 11-11-2010, 01:12 AM
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I resize before I trim

for the reason you stated. resizing does lengthen the case. check for yourself
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  #7  
Old 11-11-2010, 09:13 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2009
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Re: What is your sequence?

For low pressure rounds like .308:

Run dirty brass through a Lee Collet die and reprime in the same step. Done. The Collet Die produces so little neck growth I can ignore it for many reloadings. I have no problem getting 0.5 MOA with dropping un-weighed charges and flying through brass prep like this, so why bother? I do use precision dies and a good powder measure that's always within 0.1 grain.

For 300 WSM and other rounds that won't feed unless full-length resized:

Lube
Resize
Trim
Polish
Clean out flash holes
Reprime.
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