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Reloading Berger Bullets

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weighing brass

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  #15  
Unread 08-16-2009, 06:54 PM
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Re: weighing brass

I just started weighing my brass, just to see what would happen. I was a bit disappointed that the brass (Winchester) only varied +/- 0.75 grains, with one or two outliers in the bag. I'm not sure that tight a spread is worth weighing/separating, but why not? The summer is long and hot, and my bench is in air conditioned space.
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  #16  
Unread 08-18-2009, 05:53 PM
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Re: weighing brass

IMO, weighing brass is a waste of time for hunting reloads. My opinion, from what I have read, is also shared by those far more knowledgeable than I.
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  #17  
Unread 08-18-2009, 06:01 PM
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Re: weighing brass

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goofycat View Post
IMO, weighing brass is a waste of time for hunting reloads. My opinion, from what I have read, is also shared by those far more knowledgeable than I.

"Hunting Reloads" ??? I weigh the brass on my "Hunting Reloads" I am confident I can be lethal well past 1200yds (Much further in good conditions).

AJ
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  #18  
Unread 08-18-2009, 08:03 PM
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Re: weighing brass

I weight at least 30 once fired cases for each lot of brass I use in order to measure internal volume and enter the average volume represented by grains of H2O in Quickload. I've done this for hundreds of cases of different brands and calibers. Every time I do this I enter the data in an Excel spreadsheet and compare weights and internal volumes. I select the brass on the basis of 1% (+ or - 0.5% from the mean) variation of internal volume. My data shows that the correlation between weight and internal volume is valid less than 50% of the time. With Lapua brass the correlation is valid about 48% of the time. With Winchester brass it's less than 30%.

In my initial sampling of 30 cases, if I find 1 case with a variance of more than + or - 0.5%, I measure the internal volume of all the cases in the lot and weed out those that exceed the tolerance level. In my 338 Edge I've had Remington cases that vary as much as 10 grs and yet had practically the same internal volume. On the other hand I've had cases with similar weight where some where rejected for exceeding the internal volume tolerance.

I weight cases because I have to in order to measure internal volume. However, I'm absolutely convinced that selecting cases on the basis of weight alone is an absolute waste of time. In fact, to the extent that cases are selected by weight that should be rejected for exceeding internal volume tolerances, that practice is a potential source of vertical dispersion in long range shooting.
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  #19  
Unread 08-18-2009, 08:10 PM
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Re: weighing brass

Moosetracker,

How exactly are you measuring the volume? I've used ball powder and I've used water, I've thought about using Isopropyle alcohol.

What are you doing to the brass after you once fire them, before you weigh and check the volume?

Thanks,
AJ
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  #20  
Unread 08-18-2009, 08:15 PM
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Re: weighing brass

Quote:
Originally Posted by AJ Peacock View Post
"Hunting Reloads" ??? I weigh the brass on my "Hunting Reloads" I am confident I can be lethal well past 1200yds (Much further in good conditions).

AJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goofycat View Post
IMO, weighing brass is a waste of time for hunting reloads. My opinion, from what I have read, is also shared by those far more knowledgeable than I.

"Hunting Reloads" ??? I weigh the brass on my "Hunting Reloads" I am confident I can be lethal well past 1200yds (Much further in good conditions).

AJ
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  #21  
Unread 08-18-2009, 08:28 PM
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Re: weighing brass

Read Froggy's comments on weighing brass; located below the pic of the loading bench. I don't know the range context he is speaking of, of course. For ultra long-ranges, I would most likely weigh brass and see if it provided better accuracy than non-weighed brass. I don't shoot at 1200 yard ranges, however, so we are comparing apples to oranges. For my shooting purposes, let me say that I don't weigh brass and have had no problems hitting small varmints with reasonably good accuracy.
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