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Tuning a load

 
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  #8  
Old 01-09-2013, 02:26 PM
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Re: Tuning a load

As far as tuning a load with seating depth.

Step one....shoot your targets as far away as possible. I used to tune my 1k loads at 1K...but now have a perminent target/berm at 750. What you are tuning out is verticle....verticle showes up more at LR.


I always start .020 INTO the lands....that way when I change things I only need to go ONE WAY....OUT (shorter). If you start twenty out, which way do you go.......longer or shorter???

Good luck,
Tod
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  #9  
Old 01-09-2013, 04:38 PM
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Re: Tuning a load

Quote:
Originally Posted by 4xforfun View Post
As far as tuning a load with seating depth.

Step one....shoot your targets as far away as possible. I used to tune my 1k loads at 1K...but now have a perminent target/berm at 750. What you are tuning out is verticle....verticle showes up more at LR.


I always start .020 INTO the lands....that way when I change things I only need to go ONE WAY....OUT (shorter). If you start twenty out, which way do you go.......longer or shorter???

Good luck,
Tod
Either I just start there because it's always given me fairly decent results. Me personally never load into the lands for the whole getting a bullet stuck in the lands thing kinda brings a quick end to a hunt, so why test a bullet seating depth that I'll never ever use, if a guy is shooting BR by all means go into the lands.
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Keep in mind the animals we shoot for food and display are not bullet proof. Contrary to popular belief, they bleed and die just like they did a hundred years ago. Being competent with a given rifle is far more important than impressive ballistics and poor shootability. High velocity misses never put a steak in the freezer.

Joe
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  #10  
Old 01-09-2013, 06:07 PM
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Re: Tuning a load

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe King View Post
Either I just start there because it's always given me fairly decent results. Me personally never load into the lands for the whole getting a bullet stuck in the lands thing kinda brings a quick end to a hunt, so why test a bullet seating depth that I'll never ever use, if a guy is shooting BR by all means go into the lands.
Good point. I guess that my hunting guns have sufficiant neck tention that pulling a bullet is not a concern. But...I have pulled LOTS of bullets in my comp guns....and it sucks!!!!
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  #11  
Old 01-09-2013, 06:11 PM
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Re: Tuning a load

In contrast to traditional load development as described;
Once you've narrowed powder to seemingly best performance, a move to adjustments in seating afterwards is just gonna mangle what you've done to that point. This, because there is nothing 'fine' about the affects of gross seating adjustments, and if you don't check it gross, well then you really didn't test seating..
Now as your load falls apart with seating adjustments, your judgement about each OAL is poorly influenced.

Instead, I pick a mid pressure load with my chosen powder/primer/bullet & follow gross to fine seating testing similar to Berger's recommended. This, because that mid pressure load(down several grains) isn't so near to best as to mask the results of seating adjustments alone. I'm steering clear of any collapse in powder tune.
Then I move on to ladder testing with powder, again gross to fine.

Aside from neck tension, powder is the finest of adjustments(right down to single kernels).
And this is why powder should follow bigger adjustments(like primers & seating), and then you can move on to neck tension last.
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  #12  
Old 01-09-2013, 07:26 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2010
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Re: Tuning a load

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikecr View Post
In contrast to traditional load development as described;
Once you've narrowed powder to seemingly best performance, a move to adjustments in seating afterwards is just gonna mangle what you've done to that point. This, because there is nothing 'fine' about the affects of gross seating adjustments, and if you don't check it gross, well then you really didn't test seating..
Now as your load falls apart with seating adjustments, your judgement about each OAL is poorly influenced.

Instead, I pick a mid pressure load with my chosen powder/primer/bullet & follow gross to fine seating testing similar to Berger's recommended. This, because that mid pressure load(down several grains) isn't so near to best as to mask the results of seating adjustments alone. I'm steering clear of any collapse in powder tune.
Then I move on to ladder testing with powder, again gross to fine.

Aside from neck tension, powder is the finest of adjustments(right down to single kernels).
And this is why powder should follow bigger adjustments(like primers & seating), and then you can move on to neck tension last.


In english Please.... LOL... load testing is really interesting to me... but my head can't grasp this.... and I know it must be me.... isn't it....?
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  #13  
Old 01-09-2013, 07:50 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
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Re: Tuning a load

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe King View Post
Either I just start there because it's always given me fairly decent results. Me personally never load into the lands for the whole getting a bullet stuck in the lands thing kinda brings a quick end to a hunt, so why test a bullet seating depth that I'll never ever use, if a guy is shooting BR by all means go into the lands.
Not ME Joe. Right up to the lands but not into them. I HAVE stuck bullets in the rifelings and it sucks big time! If Im working a load that I "think" might be...I'll Dykem a bullet to check and the distance from the head to the marks on the slug....I'll cut that distance back .003-.005 to make sure Im clear. Not buy much...but clear never the less
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  #14  
Old 01-09-2013, 10:25 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 436
Re: Tuning a load

Thank you all for your ideas. They are greatly appreciated! I plan to use this rifle for hunting, and not for Bench shooting, so I doubt I will try jamming the bullet into the lands, but does .010" off of the lands sound like a good starting place and then working back out? Where I am going to be trying this for the first time I am not entirely sure that I want to get any closer than that until I am confident that I am finding the distance to the lands accurately.

Mike, what you said about changing the OAL after finding an accurate load makes sense.

Again, Thank you all for your advice! I was able to go out tonight and start breaking the barrel in, and this weekend I will be able to start working on the fun part
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