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Is there any Downside to a 40* Shoulder ?

 
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Old 07-08-2011, 01:37 PM
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Re: Is there any Downside to a 40* Shoulder ?

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Originally Posted by 300magman View Post
Would I be likely to find a reamer for the 22-250 AI that uses a 37.5* or 35* shoulder?

Other than calling as many reamer manufacturers and smiths as I can find phone numbers for, to see if anyone has one....is there an easier way to search for such a reamer?

have never seen a 37.5 degree reamer for the 22-250. There are several improved 22-250's out there besides the Ackley. The Shannon uses a 35 degree shoulder with .020" taper in the case. This one according to Ackley shows very little growth in the shoulder area (doughnut). Then there is the Durham Jet that uses .243 cases with a .30" neck length and a 40 degree shoulder. I know of one that uses a 28 degree shoulder, and another that uses a 30 degree angle.
gary
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Old 07-09-2011, 09:27 AM
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Re: Is there any Downside to a 40* Shoulder ?

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Originally Posted by Trickymissfit View Post
have never seen a 37.5 degree reamer for the 22-250. There are several improved 22-250's out there besides the Ackley. The Shannon uses a 35 degree shoulder with .020" taper in the case. This one according to Ackley shows very little growth in the shoulder area (doughnut). Then there is the Durham Jet that uses .243 cases with a .30" neck length and a 40 degree shoulder. I know of one that uses a 28 degree shoulder, and another that uses a 30 degree angle.
gary
You are right Gary ,The standard shoulder on most AIs is 40o and if your going to pay to have a
reamer cut you might as well have it cut the way you want. (It cost the same) Dies are another
issue. You can make them yourself of have them made.

If single loading then 40o is not a problem but can be in a repeater.

I would say If you want less than 40o and can find a set of dies to match what you want,
that would be the easiest way to go.

J E CUSTOM
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Old 07-09-2011, 10:26 AM
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Re: Is there any Downside to a 40* Shoulder ?

The concerns are feeding and can require modification of the feed ramp, The mouth of the brass likes to catch on the sides of the internal ramp. on stagger feed wells one side will pop out the cartridge to soon and the other side too late. donuts are a very real concern but easily taken care of with an adjustable hand ream. Adjustable reams are available at machinist supply store for under 20 dollars, The adjustable ones give you the option of removing the donut before or after sizing and the same for correcting the problems of moving brass around. reisizing dies can be made with the same ream that cut your chamber but dies made from a casting of your chamber either by your ream guru or custom die manufacturer are better. p.s. take your brass with you while you purchase your reamer and make sure that the pointed pilot end can be filed off short enough that the parrallel section will go past the shoulder neck junction.
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Old 07-09-2011, 12:33 PM
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Re: Is there any Downside to a 40* Shoulder ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by J E Custom View Post
You are right Gary ,The standard shoulder on most AIs is 40o and if your going to pay to have a
reamer cut you might as well have it cut the way you want. (It cost the same) Dies are another
issue. You can make them yourself of have them made.

If single loading then 40o is not a problem but can be in a repeater.

I would say If you want less than 40o and can find a set of dies to match what you want,
that would be the easiest way to go.

J E CUSTOM
lately I've kinda gotten on the 35 degree bandwagon with large diameter cases, but they still don't run thru a forming die all that well. Also looking back and doing some serious thinking about it; I don't know if the 40 degree shoulder angle is the main reason for the doughnut problems, but I do think it sorta amplifies the situation. Reason I say this is when I look at Weatherby mag cases, I don't see it much. They will run anywhere from 44 degrees to nearly 48 degrees when CAD'd out. I kinda have the feeling in the back of my head that it's the sharp shoulder with the small radius at the neck and case body stopping the flow of brass right at the weakest point.

what do you think?
gary
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  #12  
Old 07-09-2011, 12:58 PM
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Re: Is there any Downside to a 40* Shoulder ?

TRICKYMISSFIT, I think your observation is correct. I think the rest of the story is the ring left by the origional neck shoulder junction being moved. And by the neck wanting to shove down into the shoulder from the less supportive shoulder angle. In any case its an easily corrected problem but can be a continual annoyance.
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