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Seating primers

 
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  #1  
Old 01-03-2013, 08:50 PM
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Seating primers

When I seat primers with my rcbs hand primer seater, I just squeeze the handle all the way down every time. I have read that people like to get a good "feel" when they prime cases and also they take extra care to make sure every primer is seated the same. So is there a different way I should be seating them? Should I not squeeze the handle all the way down? Thanks for all the help.
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  #2  
Old 01-03-2013, 09:02 PM
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Re: Seating primers

Quote:
Originally Posted by arrow View Post
When I seat primers with my rcbs hand primer seater, I just squeeze the handle all the way down every time. I have read that people like to get a good "feel" when they prime cases and also they take extra care to make sure every primer is seated the same. So is there a different way I should be seating them? Should I not squeeze the handle all the way down? Thanks for all the help.
I think they may be referring to RCBS press when they try and get a good feel while seating primers . I may be wrong .

Good question , I use RCBS hand priming tool and do it the same way you do . I love it I can prime 50 casings in a snap . I still feel the primer and how deep it is , (old habbit I guess)
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  #3  
Old 01-03-2013, 11:46 PM
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Re: Seating primers

Arrow,

No, the notion of "feel" applies to the hand priming tools and press mounted units as well. What we're normally talking about here is the ability to actually feel the anvil bottom out within the pocket, and the slight amount of pre-load applied to sensitize the compound. Hand tools don't have as much leverage as a press, and makes it that much easier to get that sense of "feel" to know when all is going properly. The mechanical advantage of the press, so needed to overcome the forces required for case sizing, work against it being a good priming tool. The terrific camming power available in these tools simply overwhelms the small force needed to seat a primer, making it almost impossible to tell when the anvil bottoms out, how much load you're putting on it, etc.. Kind of like trying to drive in a thumbtack with a sledge hammer, more is not always better.

Sounds like you're doing fine here, just take the time to get familiar with the force it takes to seat the primer, what it feels like, and how it "stops" at the end of the stroke. You'll do fine.
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  #4  
Old 01-04-2013, 04:03 PM
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
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Re: Seating primers

I use the RCBS bench mounted manual hand primer. I can easily feel the primer when it bottoms out but it just like the one hand operated can be "adjusted" to push the primer "X" deep by adding a shim or removing a teenie tiny bit of material from the cam surface.
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  #5  
Old 01-04-2013, 06:17 PM
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Re: Seating primers

Primer seating will, ideally, slightly compress the pellet between the cup and anvil consistantly. That's by feel, it can't be done simply by pushing each one to a stop on the priming tool or press.
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  #6  
Old 01-04-2013, 07:03 PM
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Re: Seating primers

Crush can't be set consistently by feel either.
It can only be done by actually measuring while seating, as done with a K&M.
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  #7  
Old 01-04-2013, 09:50 PM
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Re: Seating primers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Thomas View Post
Arrow,

No, the notion of "feel" applies to the hand priming tools and press mounted units as well. What we're normally talking about here is the ability to actually feel the anvil bottom out within the pocket, and the slight amount of pre-load applied to sensitize the compound. Hand tools don't have as much leverage as a press, and makes it that much easier to get that sense of "feel" to know when all is going properly. The mechanical advantage of the press, so needed to overcome the forces required for case sizing, work against it being a good priming tool. The terrific camming power available in these tools simply overwhelms the small force needed to seat a primer, making it almost impossible to tell when the anvil bottoms out, how much load you're putting on it, etc.. Kind of like trying to drive in a thumbtack with a sledge hammer, more is not always better.

Sounds like you're doing fine here, just take the time to get familiar with the force it takes to seat the primer, what it feels like, and how it "stops" at the end of the stroke. You'll do fine.
Kevin,

I use the hand tool to seat my primers and I bottom out the handle on every primer that I seat. Do you use this tool ? If so how do you know you are squeezing it the same amount each time ? Is there an adjustment with this RCBS hand tool ? I can feel it bottom out. Right now I am getting consistent 3 shot groups at 1000 yrds that measure 8 3/4 inches If i wasnt doing it right I feel that I wouldnt get these results. If you know a better way for me to tighten my groups up I am all ears
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