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Reloading scale

 
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  #15  
Old 10-14-2013, 02:09 PM
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Re: Reloading scale

Most balance beams weigh to .01 grain electronics weigh to .002 grain for inexpensive ones to .001 for expensive scales. .002 equals 1 granule of Varget , of you think that dodent make a difference than don't try F-class or 1000yd bench rest!
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  #16  
Old 10-14-2013, 11:13 PM
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Re: Reloading scale

Now that we have beat the subject to death, anyone know how an electronic scale operates? Curious minds want to know....

And what seperates a good scale from a run of the mill one??
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  #17  
Old 10-15-2013, 06:53 AM
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Re: Reloading scale

There's something so commonplace about a weighing device that it's easy to forget its deeper significance. As the slightly skewed spring scale hanging around the produce aisle reminds us, the scale has long served humans as the chief arbiter of commerce, the sine qua non of shipping and the utility player of the pharmaceutical bench. From the smallest, most fine-tuned laboratory balance to the 10-by-120-foot (3-by-37-meter) pit-and-girder monsters that weigh train cars and tractor-trailers, scales make modern life possible.
Scales -- or, more specifically, balances -- weighed heavily on the minds of ancient builders, inventors and economic advisers. Small balance weights dating back to the early fourth millennium B.C. provide some of the first hints of mankind's evolving grasp of numbers. The most basic surviving balance scale in Egypt predates the dynastic period, placing its construction at earlier than 3000 B.C. Like us, the ancient Egyptians applied scales both in trade and in assaying ores and alloys [sources: Encyclopaedia Britannica; Petruso].
Balances, which weigh an object by matching it against one or more reference weights, have a delicate touch and are still used in laboratories. Scales use somewhat different physical principles and mechanical components to measure weight and other forces (weight is simply the force on an object due to gravity). Spring scales, for example, measure weight using Hooke's law, which relates force (weight) to the stretching or compression of a spring made from a given material.
Not all scales use springs, but all measure weight using mechanical components. So, mechanical and digital scales differ only in how they display weight -- mechanically or electronically. In the latter case, the scale employs an analog-to-digital converter that translates the continuous readout data from the scale into discrete digital information, much in the way that a CD or MP3 encoding scheme digitizes the waveforms of music.
Generally speaking, digital scales require less expertise to use than those with mechanical readouts, and are capable of higher precision and faster processing. Still, the capabilities of specific devices may vary, particularly when the weights are measured in tons [sources: Camarda; Cox; Crowley].
"It depends," says Derrick Mashaney, director of product development at Fairbanks Scales Inc., which specializes in large industrial scales. "Several master scales are mechanical. They're tweaked to be so extremely accurate that there is nothing out there that compares to them."
Just as a roadside carjack might lift a car via mechanical advantage -- the leverage of a handle or the inclined plane of a screw -- while a mechanic's hoist might use hydraulic pressure, different scales weigh objects using a variety of operational principles, like hydraulics, pneumatics or bending beams.
Whatever makes them stretch, compress or sway, however, most modern scales share one component in common: a load cell
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  #18  
Old 10-15-2013, 07:23 AM
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Re: Reloading scale

an electronic scale works with a preasure switch so, it is important that you place the charge center of the pad (the cheeper the scale the more important this is). As an item is placed on the pad the switch registers the difference in resitance (of the electricity passing through the switch) the chip then shows this resistance in a read out converted from milli ohms to grains.
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  #19  
Old 10-15-2013, 09:14 AM
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Re: Reloading scale

Quote:
Originally Posted by jvon View Post
Most balance beams weigh to .01 grain electronics weigh to .002 grain for inexpensive ones to .001 for expensive scales. .002 equals 1 granule of Varget , of you think that dodent make a difference than don't try F-class or 1000yd bench rest!

While I agree they can weigh 1 grain of Varget....one grain making a big difference...I seriously doubt!
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  #20  
Old 10-15-2013, 09:14 AM
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Re: Reloading scale

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freedom2live View Post
There's something so commonplace about a weighing device that it's easy to forget its deeper significance. As the slightly skewed spring scale hanging around the produce aisle reminds us, the scale has long served humans as the chief arbiter of commerce, the sine qua non of shipping and the utility player of the pharmaceutical bench. From the smallest, most fine-tuned laboratory balance to the 10-by-120-foot (3-by-37-meter) pit-and-girder monsters that weigh train cars and tractor-trailers, scales make modern life possible.
Scales -- or, more specifically, balances -- weighed heavily on the minds of ancient builders, inventors and economic advisers. Small balance weights dating back to the early fourth millennium B.C. provide some of the first hints of mankind's evolving grasp of numbers. The most basic surviving balance scale in Egypt predates the dynastic period, placing its construction at earlier than 3000 B.C. Like us, the ancient Egyptians applied scales both in trade and in assaying ores and alloys [sources: Encyclopaedia Britannica; Petruso].
Balances, which weigh an object by matching it against one or more reference weights, have a delicate touch and are still used in laboratories. Scales use somewhat different physical principles and mechanical components to measure weight and other forces (weight is simply the force on an object due to gravity). Spring scales, for example, measure weight using Hooke's law, which relates force (weight) to the stretching or compression of a spring made from a given material.
Not all scales use springs, but all measure weight using mechanical components. So, mechanical and digital scales differ only in how they display weight -- mechanically or electronically. In the latter case, the scale employs an analog-to-digital converter that translates the continuous readout data from the scale into discrete digital information, much in the way that a CD or MP3 encoding scheme digitizes the waveforms of music.
Generally speaking, digital scales require less expertise to use than those with mechanical readouts, and are capable of higher precision and faster processing. Still, the capabilities of specific devices may vary, particularly when the weights are measured in tons [sources: Camarda; Cox; Crowley].
"It depends," says Derrick Mashaney, director of product development at Fairbanks Scales Inc., which specializes in large industrial scales. "Several master scales are mechanical. They're tweaked to be so extremely accurate that there is nothing out there that compares to them."
Just as a roadside carjack might lift a car via mechanical advantage -- the leverage of a handle or the inclined plane of a screw -- while a mechanic's hoist might use hydraulic pressure, different scales weigh objects using a variety of operational principles, like hydraulics, pneumatics or bending beams.
Whatever makes them stretch, compress or sway, however, most modern scales share one component in common: a load cell
Ah ....Do WHAT????
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  #21  
Old 10-15-2013, 10:42 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: S.E. Michigan
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Re: Reloading scale

My take is simply this...

The load cell and it's accompaning components and their ability to indicate a weight and do it with exact repetition, is entirely based on the quality of the components and we all know that most manufacturers buy the least expensive components and that would directly impact the accuracy, especially the repetitive accuracy..

Having said that, If I was to purchase an electronic scale, I'd buy the best available, not a cheap Chinese knockoff.....

Whereas...

A mechanical scale don't rely on electronics but rather a known differential between the item to be weighed and the offsetting weight on the balance beam. The only factor that impacts repetitive accurate repetitive weighing is the inherent friction between the axle on the beam and the bearings that support the axle.

Somehow, I believe Ohaus (in the case of RCBS beam scales) has extrapolated the frictional resistance and incorporated that into the beam itself.

Like everything else, you get what you pay for.
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