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powder and bullet combos in a 223 bolt gun

 
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  #8  
Old 10-07-2013, 10:55 PM
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Re: powder and bullet combos in a 223 bolt gun

a lot of what distance is usable is what you plan on doing with it. I use my Remington out to 350 yards on Coyotes, but wouldn't be afraid to try a 400 yard shot. Also the thought of a clean kill is important. I find 350 yards with a 55 grain bullet to be about it, but with a 12 twist barrel you might be able to shoot 60 grain bullets or better yet the 53 grain V-Max. My barrel is 20 inches long, and probably about two inches shorter than optimum. Still I see 3270fps with a 55 grain bullet, and it's not a max load. Still it's done at 400 yards when it comes to coyotes. If I could get 3400fps out of a 53 grain V-Max, that's where I would start.
gary
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  #9  
Old 10-08-2013, 05:18 PM
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Re: powder and bullet combos in a 223 bolt gun

I tried 40gr Nosler, 50gr Sierra Blitz King, the winner is Hornadys 53gr V-Max Powder V 133 powder & Rem Small Rifle Bench Rest primers 3465 FPS groups in my rifle .77 inches groups averages at 200 yds.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:38 PM
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Re: powder and bullet combos in a 223 bolt gun

I tried 40gr Nosler, 50gr Sierra Blitz King, the winner is Hornadys 53gr V-Max Powder V 133 powder & Rem Small Rifle Bench Rest primers 3465 FPS groups in my rifle .77 inches groups averages at 200 yds.
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  #11  
Old 10-09-2013, 06:00 AM
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Re: powder and bullet combos in a 223 bolt gun

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trickymissfit View Post
I'd double check the twist rate, as most Howa / Weatherbys I've seen were 14 twist. A 12 twist is a bonus. The .223 will shoot 55 grain bullets very well, and some 60 grain bullets. It's not the weight of the bullet anyway, but the ballistic coefficient. The twelve twist will handle up to about a .28. Yet something like the 53 grain V-Max would be about it. Try the V-Max in 50 and 55 grains.

gary
Please explain this comment. The BC is the figure of performance that bucks wind resistance and keeps the bullet going faster, longer, thus providing better trajectory. The bearing surface of the bullet is what influences stability related to barrel twist. Long bullets in slow twist barrels don't obtain adequate rotational velocity to stabilize. A pointy bullet will have the same stability as a stubby bullet for the same twist barrel but the BC will define down range performance.
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  #12  
Old 10-09-2013, 08:52 AM
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Re: powder and bullet combos in a 223 bolt gun

thank you for all the info guys, i have shot some factory loaded 40 grain v max and they seem promising in a handload, im going to go try some reduced loads today using trail boss and see what i can do.
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  #13  
Old 10-09-2013, 11:02 AM
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Re: powder and bullet combos in a 223 bolt gun

Quote:
Originally Posted by flashhole View Post
Please explain this comment. The BC is the figure of performance that bucks wind resistance and keeps the bullet going faster, longer, thus providing better trajectory. The bearing surface of the bullet is what influences stability related to barrel twist. Long bullets in slow twist barrels don't obtain adequate rotational velocity to stabilize. A pointy bullet will have the same stability as a stubby bullet for the same twist barrel but the BC will define down range performance.
looking in the glossary of the Hornaday manual it states:
* "an index of the manner in which a particular projectile decelerates in free flight. Expressed mathematically as c= WID2" ("D" squared)
W= mass weight in pounds
I = form factor or coefficient in form
D= diameter squared

Speer words it a little differently, but is essentially the same thing. The call it out as a ratio of the sectional density to the bullet form. In other words it's ability to overcome air resistance during flight.

The above ratio also helps to fight wind drift. But in the end weight means very little in barrel selection as the ballistic coefficient determines the needed twist rate. A fine example of this is the Speer 52 grain HP is listed at a .225 B/C (#1035), while the 52 grain BTHP Match bullet (#1036) is listed at .253. The difference is purely shape.

rotational speed is old (real old) school technology, and has been proven not to work all that well when figuring what twist rate is needed to stabilize a bullet. Walt Berger once told me that it took 179K rpm to stabilize a VLD. Looks good on paper, but will not always work. Later I changed the way I looked at his idea to 179K at to impact. A little better, but still not right. Then I read a very good article in Precision Shooting on bullet over stabilization. It brought in the center of gravity factor and what an error in C/G can cause. I learned that a .0001 error in C/G (very common and often worse) will cause 3/32" growth in groups at 100 yards, and over spinning them will increase this.
gary
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