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Reloading Techniques For Reloading


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Old powder

 
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  #8  
Old 04-27-2014, 10:07 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Colorado
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Re: Old powder

Haha yeah I agree. I try to be cautious with powder of any age. Only
One or two have been opened so I doubt they'd be any good but the rest I think are sealed. I'm not going to use them, I'd rather have a batch of my grandads stuff on my component bookshelf. I appreciate the info though
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  #9  
Old 04-27-2014, 03:26 PM
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Re: Old powder

the opened cans ditch.
The sealed cans, this is what I would do. Find an old lyman book (60's or 70's vintage) use the start load and put a few together now invite you inlaws to the range to introduce them to shooting. Have them fire them off, if everything goes well and your inlaws had a good time great. If on the other hand a bad bang happens no problem Win Win!
Seriously though, ditch the opened cans, give the sniff test to the sealed cans and use the start load data on the cans that pass the sniff test
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  #10  
Old 04-27-2014, 03:42 PM
Edd Edd is offline
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Re: Old powder

Post some pictures of the cans. They might have some value empty.
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  #11  
Old 04-27-2014, 04:42 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2013
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Re: Old powder

Haha while the relatives idea is very tempting I think
I'm gonna bench it all and keep my grandads stuff. Maybe if I ever do a dream hunt use some for the nostalgia value. Who knows!
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  #12  
Old 04-27-2014, 09:41 PM
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Re: Old powder

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gray R View Post
Haha while the relatives idea is very tempting I think
I'm gonna bench it all and keep my grandads stuff. Maybe if I ever do a dream hunt use some for the nostalgia value. Who knows!

All powders have a shelf life and must be disposed of when it goes bad.

If you are not going to use it, I would suggest you dispose of it safely before it becomes a safety hazard. Keep the empty containers for nostalgia and enjoy there prices and the fact that your grandfather once used them.

It "will" go bad with enough time and become a hazard so "Use it or lose it".

I have bullets that have the price still on the boxes that cost less than $3.00 for a box of 100
(Those were the good old times) but bullets have a great shelf life, unlike powder and primers.

Just a recommendation

J E CUSTOM
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  #13  
Old 04-27-2014, 10:53 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2013
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Re: Old powder

Thank you for the heads up I'll go ahead and do that. And man I can't imagine paying 3.00 for a box of 100. I'd apart be able
To afford to shoot then!
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  #14  
Old 04-28-2014, 01:01 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Washington State
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Re: Old powder

The smell test is a little iffy because the residual solvent is mistaken as an "acid" smell when it is just a burning solvent effect on your nose.

Best way to test powder I have found is to take a brand new clean sheet of copy paper right from the ream and pour a generous amount of the powder in the middle. Roll it around on the paper for a few seconds and then cup the paper and pour the powder back into the can. In daylight (because it is a whole spectrum light source) look at that paper compared to another clean piece from the same ream. Gray is okay but even a hint of brick colored red is bad ju ju. This trick will identify even the slightest trace of red.

This method will tell you if powder has gone bad (deteriorated) sooner than you can smell the acid formation. By the time the powder has developed an acrid odor it has been gone a long time.

If the cans were opened and resealed right away they might still be okay. Heat is the #1 powder killer, not air. If the powder shows no rusty dusty on the paper I would try some loads reduced 10%. If they don't show high pressure then start working up slowly as usual. I have some double based flake powders that are thirty years old (I bought new off the gunshop's shelves) that are still fine. I test them regular and they are in partially used cans that are opened and resealed many times. The Bullseye is in the old snap cap metal can! Double base powders are a little more stable than single based.

As far as how old is too old? The oldest smokeless (Nitrocellulose/ Nitroglycerin double based flake) is Unique first made by Laflin & Rand which became Hercules which became Alliant. Some of it has been stored UNDERWATER since the 1890's when it was made. Almost 120 years later it is still the same!

Something to think about....

KB
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