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Reloading Berger Bullets

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Neck Turning Brass

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  #1  
Unread 08-28-2013, 08:22 AM
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Neck Turning Brass

For the people out there that neck turn your brass, what neck thickness are you ending up with?

I have just turned enough to clean up my brass and ended up with about .012". Is this about normal?

Randy
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  •   #2  
    Unread 08-28-2013, 08:47 AM
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    Re: Neck Turning Brass

    I usually shoot for an 80% clean and yes .012" would be fine. My 6br some ends up at .011"

    Jeff
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      #3  
    Unread 08-29-2013, 06:15 AM
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    Re: Neck Turning Brass

    I think most would agree neck turning can help make neck tension consistent with brass that has uneven neck wall thicknesses. 284 win brass comes to mind.

    As for what wall thickness the cartridge ends up with depends on the chamber reamer's neck diameter. I prefer to have .003" to .004" clearance per side for bullet release. I have a 30 BR reamer that is working with .001" clearance per side. IMO a tight release clearance requires diligence and attention to detail. Carbon must be removed with steel wool after every shot. I have also discovered after several firings/sizings that the necks must be turned again as they thicken slightly.

    If one decides to turn necks on a factory hunting rifle that already has more than ample neck release clearance the neck tension consistency might improve accuracy but the necks could split early in the life of the case. I know I am guilty of doing exactly that with my first attempts at neck turning for a large case neck clearanced 284 win.

    Skim turning and removing approximately 80% of the brass from the neck is the best approach for no turn chambers. Just realize the necks might be the first part of the case to fail.
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      #4  
    Unread 08-29-2013, 07:23 AM
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    Re: Neck Turning Brass

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AZShooter View Post
    I think most would agree neck turning can help make neck tension consistent with brass that has uneven neck wall thicknesses. 284 win brass comes to mind.

    As for what wall thickness the cartridge ends up with depends on the chamber reamer's neck diameter. I prefer to have .003" to .004" clearance per side for bullet release. I have a 30 BR reamer that is working with .001" clearance per side. IMO a tight release clearance requires diligence and attention to detail. Carbon must be removed with steel wool after every shot. I have also discovered after several firings/sizings that the necks must be turned again as they thicken slightly.

    If one decides to turn necks on a factory hunting rifle that already has more than ample neck release clearance the neck tension consistency might improve accuracy but the necks could split early in the life of the case. I know I am guilty of doing exactly that with my first attempts at neck turning for a large case neck clearanced 284 win.

    Skim turning and removing approximately 80% of the brass from the neck is the best approach for no turn chambers. Just realize the necks might be the first part of the case to fail.
    I invented a special technique for neck turning in a factory chamber called partial neck sizing . The reason I say I invented it was because I came up with it all by myself but others would have also done the same thing .
    For a bolt gun if you only size some of the neck and leave an unsized second shoulder . You will avoid all the negatives associated with neck turning in a factory chamber . Use a Lee collet die to size the neck with a washer over the case to shorten it. Use a Redding body die to size the remainder of the case when needed but it will never touch the slight second shoulder . It stays a neat fit at all times . If it drags when chambering shorten the unsized section a bit . The die system reduces case neck hardening and the partial sizing reduces stress on the case neck while expanding and keeps the case centred no matter what other sizing is done .
    I know 4 World champion shots that use this system .
    I load every bolt action I have this way and skim turn the necks on every one.
    Don't believe me ? Try it and see .
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      #5  
    Unread 08-29-2013, 08:35 AM
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    Re: Neck Turning Brass

    Bullet bumper,

    It makes sense to leave a portion of the lower case neck unsized. The redding S bushing dies leave a small amount untouched but only the very bottom of the neck. I suppose it would be easy enough to adjust the S die so it sizes even less of the neck.
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      #6  
    Unread 08-30-2013, 01:52 AM
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    Re: Neck Turning Brass

    Redding have left it that way because it's hard anyway to get a bush down all the way and not risk crushing the shoulder some , because the edge of the bushing has to have some arris on it anyway , it can't be a sharp 90 degree edge .
    However the small unsized section still helps and it does not have to be very long to give good results with neck turning . It is one of the reasons people get good results from the die , they are using partial neck sizing without knowing it . You can make it any length you want as long as chambering is easy and you get enough bullet grip for the ammo use .
    Many people will say the shoulder does all the aligning and it will not achieve anything but the fact is that sometimes people need to bump the shoulder back and size the body down to regain easy chambering so that can't be the same fit as you had before you bumped and sized it . However the second shoulder is NEVER sized so it reduces potential changes to alignment during the life of the case without the need to resort to complicated measuring tools to track sizing operations .
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      #7  
    Unread 08-30-2013, 02:51 AM
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    Re: Neck Turning Brass

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bullet bumper View Post
    I invented a special technique for neck turning in a factory chamber called partial neck sizing . The reason I say I invented it was because I came up with it all by myself but others would have also done the same thing .
    For a bolt gun if you only size some of the neck and leave an unsized second shoulder . You will avoid all the negatives associated with neck turning in a factory chamber . Use a Lee collet die to size the neck with a washer over the case to shorten it. Use a Redding body die to size the remainder of the case when needed but it will never touch the slight second shoulder . It stays a neat fit at all times . If it drags when chambering shorten the unsized section a bit . The die system reduces case neck hardening and the partial sizing reduces stress on the case neck while expanding and keeps the case centred no matter what other sizing is done .
    I know 4 World champion shots that use this system .
    I load every bolt action I have this way and skim turn the necks on every one.
    Don't believe me ? Try it and see .
    Hello Jeff, BB, and AZS,

    For such a short thread there's been a ton of info here. I never cease to be impressed by the wealth of experience and knowledge in this group.

    I am a padiwan when it comes to reloading and am always eager to learn from the Jedi Masters of reloading that we have here to guide us.

    Questions I have are:

    When you state "80 percent" are you referring to 80% of the neck length or neck thickness?

    The partial neck sizing makes a lot of sense to me, albeit I am still a lowly padiwan. I use a Lee FL die and Neck Collet die and my 300WM is a 'factory' rifle.

    How much of the neck is sized in this process and how would you go about setting up the die to size just a portion of the neck

    When using a "washer", exactly what is it's purpose and where is it placed? I have seen 'shims' which are placed beneath the casing on the shell holder made by Innovative Technologies and specialized shell holders which are 'sized' to increase the shoulder bump. Is this also the purpose of the "washer" and how do you determine the thickness of the washer?

    One last question: What is meant by "skim" trimming? I have an idea what is meant but I'm just not sure.

    Ok, another question just popped into my head : If you ream the necks in addition to neck trimming, would this process change?

    I am very grateful and appreciative to you 'Masters' for sharing your wealth of knowledge and experience as well as your time and patience with us 'padiwans'

    Thanks!!

    DocB
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