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Reloading Techniques For Reloading


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My reloading process.

 
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  #8  
Old 09-21-2008, 12:12 PM
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Re: My reloading process.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
Why do you store ammo point down? I always box my ammo with the bullet up, so theres no weight on the bullet to potentially change the seating depth. This also helps me identify the ammo in a box at a glance without having to handle the ammo.
I normally do the same thing, however the 338AM ammo won't fit the other way around and they don't make an ammo box big enough for it stored the other way! I write out the load info on a slip of paper and tape it to the inside of the box, unless I have a single load for a caliber (like the 338AM), then I know what they are, because that's the only load I have.

When I travel with ammo, I always store them on their side, so no jiggling either way happens.

AJ
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  #9  
Old 09-21-2008, 08:53 PM
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Re: My reloading process.

"My process certainly doesn't fix bad brass, but I believe it limits additional runout. If you have a better way to 'limit additional runout during the reloading process' please enlighten us."

No enlightenment or correction is needed, you are aleady getting good results so I have no suggestions for you to change. My point is that I have found that rotatinga case after the bullet starts off axis rarely does anything to correct it.

For sure, no good comes from a rapid lever action! I just use a clean, smooth stroke and find maybe 80% of my ammo has a run-out/tilt of less than a thou IF the cases and dies are good. I cull those cases with run-out over one thou and after awhile it's ALL good!

"As far as the electronic powder dispensing system adding or subtracting, you are probably right. I do believe it is accurate enough for anything I am doing."

Again, not a challange, accuracy of dispensing wasn't my point. It was just an observation for others that while a digital powder system is simpler and may even be faster, it is expensive and adds no accuracy to the the final product. IF the loader uses good technique, anyway!

Sloppy loaders can't seem to produce good ammo on any tools but good loaders will find out what's wrong and make their ammo good!
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  #10  
Old 09-21-2008, 09:02 PM
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Re: My reloading process.

Boomtube,

I've never played with the Lee Collet Dies, since your message, I've been doing a bit of research and may order a set for my .338 Edge.

Thanks for your input.

AJ
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  #11  
Old 09-21-2008, 10:14 PM
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Re: My reloading process.

Aj, I do pretty much what you described except I use dry neck lube(graphite) on the inside of the necks to get what I feel is even more consisent neck tension.
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  #12  
Old 04-30-2009, 03:08 PM
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Re: My reloading process.

Thanks very much AJ, that's a very good summary.

A couple of points of clarification -

1. It sounds like you do not cull new brass by weight or runout. Correct?
2. After you resize once fired brass without the expander ball, do you have to perform any other steps before the seating process?
3. You made no mention of measuring neck thickness or neck turning. Do you ever perform these steps? and, if so, under what conditions?
4. I have never used bushing dies. What are their benefits vs drawbacks?

Thanks so much for your help. I have to get the book you mentioned.

Jack

Last edited by winelines; 04-30-2009 at 03:10 PM. Reason: posted wrong place
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  #13  
Old 04-30-2009, 03:54 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2005
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Re: My reloading process.

Quote:
Originally Posted by winelines View Post
Thanks very much AJ, that's a very good summary.

A couple of points of clarification -

1. It sounds like you do not cull new brass by weight or runout. Correct?
2. After you resize once fired brass without the expander ball, do you have to perform any other steps before the seating process?
3. You made no mention of measuring neck thickness or neck turning. Do you ever perform these steps? and, if so, under what conditions?
4. I have never used bushing dies. What are their benefits vs drawbacks?

Thanks so much for your help. I have to get the book you mentioned.

Jack
1) Nope, only for obvious flaws. I sort my brass by weight after they have been fired and preped. I keep real heavy or light brass and use it for other things (foulers, random shooting etc).

2) Depending on the cartridge, sometimes I'll square up the mouths with a trimmer as I mentioned in the initial post. But I'll always resize before I trim (then deburr again).

3) I measure the necks with a ball mic and will occasionally sort out ones that are more than .001" difference side to side. To be honest, I have several rifles that can shoot more accurately than I can. I haven't been able to tell any difference in the neck wall thickness stuff with my rifles. I've neck turned to make everything perfect and still get the old sub 1/2moa group when I do my part. But I only have hunting scopes on my rifles, none of that 36x ... stuff that the target boys use, so I'll probably always stay around the 1/2moa crowd. On the other hand, I've experienced really bad brass that not only had a really thin side, it was also impossible turn into straight ammo. I use my run-out gauge to sort my shells and then will sometimes check the cartridges that had run-out after I shoot them (use the mark on the primer) for thick/thin/uneven necks and toss them if I'm convinced that is why they where bad.

4) If you are going to resize with an expander ball, then it is tough without bushing dies, because normal dies will resize the neck too far down and you will have WAY too much neck tension on your bullet. I like the bushing dies because they give me a bit more flexibility with my sizing and neck tension. It's yet another variable that can be pondered when it's too cold to shoot outside.

Hope this all helps,
AJ
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