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Long Distance Load Tuning

 
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  #8  
Old 07-25-2009, 04:49 PM
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Join Date: May 2008
Location: Ohio
Posts: 248
Re: Long Distance Load Tuning

Bkondeff,

My suggestions would be:


a) Sierra manual shows 50.9 max load for imr4831 in their 117 gr SBT’s, IMO check for pressure signs and check berger manuals, seems quite hot..
b) You cant force a bad load to be good, go with what the data is telling you,
c) don’t change seating depths while testing a load, and if you did not, only when you find the right powder and charge wt, then fine tune by adjusting seating depth,
d) You may have seated too close to begin with, granted they are 115 bergers, either try a diff bullet or differeint powder, (Retumbo, RE-22, RE-25, h4831, I have found all these good powders with the 25-06), seat .020 off and work closer in .005 increments, but only after you find a good powder charge. (use chrony for pressure spikes when close or at the lands, be careful).
e) How are you prepping your brass, and what is your full recipe? Are you using the same die process for each and every case? IMO bag the FL die for a necksizer..and get a Redding body die to bump the shoulders…
f) Keep testing at 100 , IMO only when you feel confident in your reloading and bench technique should you move out to 200…

good luck
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  #9  
Old 07-27-2009, 01:01 PM
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Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 46
Re: Long Distance Load Tuning

In my 25-06 IMR 7828ssc is the power im using. With bergers i only group test at 200 yds. They can be sleeper bullets at 100. Most 25-06 rifles like hot loads and that runs true with mine. My experience with bergers bullets, Witch is not allot, is that they like a little jump to the rifling's. My 25-06 likes .040 off the lands and my 30-06 likes .050 off. hope that helps.
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  #10  
Old 09-15-2009, 09:31 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 171
Re: Long Distance Load Tuning

I think your 200 yard groups are close enough to try a longer distance. I've often found my groups don't open up as much between 200 and 300 as they did from 100 to 200. My favorite rifle is just about MOA at 200 and half MOA from 400 to 700 which is the furthest I've shot it.
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  #11  
Old 09-16-2009, 07:11 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 847
Re: Long Distance Load Tuning

This is how I fine tune my loads at distance.
Ladder testing at 1k- Detailed article and video

It is very simple and effective.
It makes finding a good load very easy and cuts down on the amount of rounds needed to find a good load.
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  #12  
Old 09-16-2009, 07:30 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Columbia Falls, Montana
Posts: 145
Re: Long Distance Load Tuning

I noticed that you called it a "new" rifle. If so. Has the barrel been properly broken in? If not it may be fouling quickly still, so you may need to clean and fire a fouler more frequently than you are.
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  #13  
Old 01-16-2013, 11:34 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lake Tahoe, Calif.
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Re: Long Distance Load Tuning

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Eichele View Post
It helps to tune your loads at the distances you intend to shoot and not worry about 100 groups. 100 yard shooting, testing and development has its place but as you are finding out, it can be frustrating.

Make sure your paralax gets adjusted from 100 to 200 yards when you move.
This brings up a point I've been wondering about but haven't run any tests to find the answer. It may be a dumb question but here it is anyway...

Does the paralax/focus setting have a significant effect on the POI? Say I have it set and focused at 100. Then I start shooting at 200 with the same setting despite the fact that the target is not quite as sharp as it could be. Will the POI be different at 200 if I then change the focus? In other words, is it imporant to always return to the same setting for a given distance that was used when sighting in?

Finding the same exact adjustment would require adding hash marks to the paralax adjust dial, and to make matters worse I have 2 Nikon Monarchs where the yardage numbers are significantly off from the actual distance at which the image appears sharp. There is significant latitude in the adjustment zone while the image is as sharp as it can be. So changing from 110 - 180 for example may make no difference in image sharpness on an object 200 yards away. This makes it hard to set the paralax to the exact same point for a given distance each time.
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  #14  
Old 01-16-2013, 01:26 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 847
Re: Long Distance Load Tuning

Parallax adjustment makes a huge difference.
There is a huge difference between focus and parallax.
I can't type much since I'm using my phone to write this
Please do a search for proper parallax adjustment.
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