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Lee and RCBS powder scale inaccuracy...

 
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  #50  
Old 04-16-2013, 11:39 AM
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Re: Lee and RCBS powder scale inaccuracy...

Bart B---I think your last sentence pretty well nails it for most people that reload. However, there still seem to be quite a few out there that feel they need to be within one kernel of powder of their target weight for every load that goes through their press. I think if everyone stayed within the +/-deviation you mentioned that they would be fine and if they can cut it down lower than that without spending thousands of dollars and their valuable time, more power to them.
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  #51  
Old 04-16-2013, 11:45 AM
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Re: Lee and RCBS powder scale inaccuracy...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sully2 View Post
Do you actually think anyone besides yourself......and especially 99% of the people reading and posting on this site....give a big rats ass about the WM..? If you do...I have a news flash for you...!

Why did we ever vary from the Lee VS RCBS debate??

***I think you're way off in your statement and I hope most would give a big rat's azz because the w&m part of reloading is the most important part that if not followed properly will lead to dire consequences!
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  #52  
Old 04-16-2013, 03:17 PM
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Re: Lee and RCBS powder scale inaccuracy...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Topgun 30-06 View Post
I would hope you could see the beam moving as you trickle powder onto the pan as that's the benefit of using it as you mentioned. How are you going to watch it move when you weigh a piece of paper, take that paper off and sign your name on it, and then put it back on? That signature wouldn't weigh but a small fraction of a kernel of powder and you're saying you can see that, so how much did the beam move and what kind of reference point did you use? Have you ever used a digital scale of any type to make the statements you have on this thread that were incorrect about them?
The beam moved approximately .005" - .007". The 1/64" graduations on a precision 6" are .0156" apart. .005" is 1/3 of that space. Magnifying it does help.
My beam scale has 5 lines, plus or minus that approximate 1/10 grain. It actually moves 3 1/2 marks when I change the weight by .5 grains. The graduations are .060" apart. I can easily see a movement of .010". I worked as a machinist & toolmaker for 46 years. Seeing a movement that small is something I did daily. It is not as big a feat as you might imagine. It takes practice to consciously notice very small changes like that, but with practice, it becomes a way of life in my trade. So if the zero line is exactly lined up with the line in the beam and the weight is change by less that 1/10 grain, it's easy to see if those lines between the are no longer lined up exactly. If the knife edges and the v-shaped block are clean as they should be, then that beam will move & the lines will no longer line up. If you beam scale isn't working properly it may not move at all. I clean my knife edges and the v-blocks every time I use my scale.
For my own satisfaction, I just zeroed my beam scale with the pan in place. I then placed one granule of Varget in the pan & it was easy for me to see the amount it moved. It wasn't much, but it did move. I could walk away from it & look at it 10 minutes later & it's still quite apparent the line no longer lined up. With my old eyes it is easier if I use a bit of magnification. Trying to see an extremely small weight does more for me to know the beam is swinging freely as it should. If it doesn't move that minute (very small) amount, I know something needs to be corrected.
Maybe you don't have the ability to do this, I don't really know or care. But I know damned well I can & I can do it repeatedly.

You might be pleasantly surprised if you spent some time practicing to do this yourself.
You and everybody else has the right to believe what they want.
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  #53  
Old 04-16-2013, 04:25 PM
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Re: Lee and RCBS powder scale inaccuracy...

Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySes23 View Post
The beam moved approximately .005" - .007". The 1/64" graduations on a precision 6" are .0156" apart. .005" is 1/3 of that space. Magnifying it does help.
My beam scale has 5 lines, plus or minus that approximate 1/10 grain. It actually moves 3 1/2 marks when I change the weight by .5 grains. The graduations are .060" apart. I can easily see a movement of .010". I worked as a machinist & toolmaker for 46 years. Seeing a movement that small is something I did daily. It is not as big a feat as you might imagine. It takes practice to consciously notice very small changes like that, but with practice, it becomes a way of life in my trade. So if the zero line is exactly lined up with the line in the beam and the weight is change by less that 1/10 grain, it's easy to see if those lines between the are no longer lined up exactly. If the knife edges and the v-shaped block are clean as they should be, then that beam will move & the lines will no longer line up. If you beam scale isn't working properly it may not move at all. I clean my knife edges and the v-blocks every time I use my scale.
For my own satisfaction, I just zeroed my beam scale with the pan in place. I then placed one granule of Varget in the pan & it was easy for me to see the amount it moved. It wasn't much, but it did move. I could walk away from it & look at it 10 minutes later & it's still quite apparent the line no longer lined up. With my old eyes it is easier if I use a bit of magnification. Trying to see an extremely small weight does more for me to know the beam is swinging freely as it should. If it doesn't move that minute (very small) amount, I know something needs to be corrected.
Maybe you don't have the ability to do this, I don't really know or care. But I know damned well I can & I can do it repeatedly.

You might be pleasantly surprised if you spent some time practicing to do this yourself.
You and everybody else has the right to believe what they want.
Wow, what are the odds that I need one more granule of Varget to finish my latest load… Would you be willing to ship it? I’ll pay postage and HazMat fees…
I'm getting a cup of coffee, I'll be back for more entertainment. LOL!!
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  #54  
Old 04-16-2013, 09:57 PM
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Re: Lee and RCBS powder scale inaccuracy...

Quote:
Originally Posted by old_heli_logger View Post
Wow, what are the odds that I need one more granule of Varget to finish my latest load… Would you be willing to ship it? I’ll pay postage and HazMat fees…
I'm getting a cup of coffee, I'll be back for more entertainment. LOL!!
Use non-dairy creamer........
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