Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Reloading

Reloading Techniques For Reloading


View Poll Results: Do you like ladder tests?
Yes 46 83.64%
No 9 16.36%
Voters: 55. You may not vote on this poll

Reply

Ladder Tests

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #15  
Old 01-23-2008, 12:28 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Black Hills,South Dakota
Posts: 661
I agree with GG,the OCW,ladder or any variation is not complete without a chrono.Either test by itself is not going to indicate that the load which shows promise is a good long range load but used in conjuction with a chrono you can get a much better idea if it shows long range promise.If your working on a long range load and it shows promise with the ladder-ocw test but the chrono is showing high es,you know you have some more work ahead of you.I know a high es somewhat contradicts a ladder-ocw test but it happens.The main reason I use the ocw method is because there is more data on the target(s) from repeated loads than the single shot on the conventional ladder.Im not trying to tell you this is the way you should do it,just giving you ideas from what Ive done.You'll eventually draw your own conclusions with your testing methods.Good luck and good shooting.
__________________
The Constitution shall never be construed to prevent the people of the United States who are peaceable citizens from keeping their own arms -Samuel Adams
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 01-23-2008, 09:19 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Fredericksburg VA
Posts: 4,090
All the discussion on wind in ladder tests goes back to one of my main points on developing serious LR accuracy loads and the ladder tests.

DO NOT DO IT IN THE WIND!

Do all serious testing for LR in "no wind" conditions. They can normally be found early mornings and late evenings, but not always.

Are you there to test accurate loads or are you there to test your wind reading ability?

Another point, highly accurate rifles at 100 yards will shoot one hole most of the time if a decent load. Very hard to tell what shot did what inside one hole.

That is another reason to go to 200-400 yards in no wind conditions.

BH
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 01-26-2008, 08:04 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: west of Little Rock ,Ark.
Posts: 1,271
So very

Quote:
Originally Posted by BountyHunter View Post
All the discussion on wind in ladder tests goes back to one of my main points on developing serious long range accuracy loads and the ladder tests.

DO NOT DO IT IN THE WIND!

Do all serious testing for long range in "no wind" conditions. They can normally be found early mornings and late evenings, but not always.

Are you there to test accurate loads or are you there to test your wind reading ability?

Another point, highly accurate rifles at 100 yards will shoot one hole most of the time if a decent load. Very hard to tell what shot did what inside one hole.

That is another reason to go to 200-400 yards in no wind conditions.

BH
True . A properly conducted ladder test will give the operator a ton of data to consider and will quickly point to the potential of the bullet / powder combo being tested .

However , the most important aspects of the test can be discovered / examined regardless of the wind . Velocity and vertical to put it succintly .

I know a fellow that routinely conducts his ladder tests in the windy environs of central Oklahoma . Yet he just as routinely benefits from the results . Perhaps he will have the time to chime in here . If so we will all benefit .

When conducting a ladder test with a person new to the method it is invariable that each shot of the test produces exclamations on their part such as " what the heck is that shot doing way over there " . To truly benefit from the results of the test you must wait till all data is in hand and then reach informed decisionsd by a careful interpretation of said data .

Targets , velocities and load info will work together to tell you what to do next .As in all things , experience will provide more and greater insight interpreting the info .

As Bountyhunter pointed out the distance the test is conducted at will help improve the understanding of what is happening . Even so if you only have 200 yds to work with the method will still work . It may take a little longer( more experience ) to be able to interpret accurately but it will happen .

Jim B.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-26-2008, 08:11 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,232
I like ladder tests, but don't view them as a 'be all end all test'. I shoot them over a chronograph at 200yds and take into account the velocities and impacts as a whole. I even do them in low switchy wind conditions and then just look at the vertical component of the shot to shot spread (this takes wind reading entirely out of the equation).

At the end of a ladder test, I absolutely know a couple things.

1) I know the approximate velocity of the entire range of loadings for those powder/bullet/primer/seating depth combinations. I can use this later to select a velocity range to work up a load.
2) I know the upper range for that powder/bullet/primer/seating depth. I know that I'm not going to get much more velocity than this, as I stop the ladder when I either see pressure signs, or start seeing velocities near the upper range shown in reloading books for top end pressures. I then know my upper load range for this combo.

I MAY suspect a couple other things

1) I MIGHT have a cluster of shots that MAY represent a 'node'. I'll normally load 10-15 rounds in the center of each of these 'nodes', just to see if one of them is REALLY an optimum load combo for this rifle.
2) If I'm using a rifle that I'm not familiar with, at the end of a ladder test I'll usually know about what kind of accuracy to expect from that rifle. If the entire ladder ihas 3 shot clusters less than 1 MOA or so, I know I've got a shooter. If the entire ladder looks more like a shotgun pattern that a rifle target, I know I have some serious work to do. I'll also typically have a feeling whether this particular barrel likes the hotter loads or milder loads.

AJ
__________________
If some is good and more is better, then too much is just right.


My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought, cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-28-2008, 11:58 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: sebastopol, ca.
Posts: 418
I am new to ladder tests

I am new to ladder tests.
Two months ago I had no idea what a ladder test was so I did some research here and on the 6mmbr.com forum.
I have a 300 win mag that I have been having a terrible time getting it to shoot. My groups were in the 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 range, pretty horrible.
I ran my first ladder test using IMR4831 and a Berger 190gr VLD bullet. It seemed my results liked a 72.5 grain load. I was getting better groups varying the powder charge than when I was loading three at a time.
I was able to load up several sets of three and adjust the oal length .005 in more for each set. I shot a group of .741 outside spread in the wind and rain a couple days ago. I know that is probably not up to snuff with most of you guys but the group is half the size than when I started so there must be some validity to the ladder method. I know I still have more work to do but if I can get some decent weather maybe the groups can be shrunk some more.
I don't have access to a Chronograph so I will need to check groups at long range to make sure I have a decent load.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-31-2008, 05:31 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: west of Little Rock ,Ark.
Posts: 1,271
So , in a nutshell

Squirrel , ( sorry , couldn't resist ) the ladder test has worked good for you , yes ? Keep on using it for different bullet powder combos as well as different rifles anmd you will be a ladder test fan .

The best load for my 300 winnie ended up being 74 grs. of RL 22 under a 190 smk, around 3080 or so velocity . .750 3 shot groups at 300 .

If you can get your hands on a copy of Creighton Audettes book " It aint necessarily so " you will find some interesting and informative reading.

Jim B.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 02-01-2008, 12:08 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: corpus christi,tx
Posts: 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slopeshunter View Post
Thanks for the link. That was a good read.
I agree!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads for: Ladder Tests
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
.338 300gr expansion tests slickyboyboo Rifles, Bullets, Barrels and Ballistics 16 12-22-2010 09:17 PM
Receiver destructive tests specweldtom Gunsmithing 1 10-21-2007 07:02 PM
LR muzzleloading tests ATH Long Range Hunting & Shooting 5 11-11-2004 10:08 PM
Tests of the G-A Precision 375 H&H Dave King Equipment Discussions 13 08-17-2004 05:24 PM
500 Jeffery and the 750gr A-Max Tests Brent Rifles, Bullets, Barrels and Ballistics 15 01-14-2004 09:00 PM

Current Poll
Are you on Facebook?
Yes - 46.79%
1,085 Vote
No - 19.23%
446 Votes
No, but I may join - 1.77%
41 Votes
No way, are you kidding? - 35.96%
834 Votes
Total Votes: 2,319
You may not vote on this poll.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC