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identifying powder

 
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  #1  
Old 03-10-2011, 09:48 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 48
identifying powder

I am getting back into reloading after a LONG absence. I have several part lbs of old powder ($14 and $16 /lb). On can is 4064. I have a number of loaded 270's. In the reloaded box of ammo it says 48grains of 4064.

I have lost my old reloading data so all I have is what was labelled in the box. I pulled the bullets from 3 and it all measures 48 grains and the powder is a fine, extruded stick powder, SHINY black.

I opened the can of 4064 and it is identical physically, but the color is tan. About the same color as Varget. If it was shiny black I would say, YES, that is it.

My question is, what color should 4064 be and does powder change color with age?

I opened a can of 4831 of the older vintage in the old paper can and it is shiny black just like the powder in the cartridges, just larger physically.

I don't want to buy a can of 4064 just to see the color but want to duplicate the load that I have loaded. I have no reason to believe that the information in the box is incorrect or has gotten mixed up with anything else.

I opened another partial can, of 4350, same vintage, and it looks they same size as the 4064 and is the same tannish color. Anyone know the color of 4350?

Thanks.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 03-11-2011, 07:26 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: saskatchewan canada
Posts: 172
Re: identifying powder

Quote:
Originally Posted by ballistx View Post
I am getting back into reloading after a LONG absence. I have several part lbs of old powder ($14 and $16 /lb). On can is 4064. I have a number of loaded 270's. In the reloaded box of ammo it says 48grains of 4064.

I have lost my old reloading data so all I have is what was labelled in the box. I pulled the bullets from 3 and it all measures 48 grains and the powder is a fine, extruded stick powder, SHINY black.

I opened the can of 4064 and it is identical physically, but the color is tan. About the same color as Varget. If it was shiny black I would say, YES, that is it.

My question is, what color should 4064 be and does powder change color with age?

I opened a can of 4831 of the older vintage in the old paper can and it is shiny black just like the powder in the cartridges, just larger physically.

I don't want to buy a can of 4064 just to see the color but want to duplicate the load that I have loaded. I have no reason to believe that the information in the box is incorrect or has gotten mixed up with anything else.

I opened another partial can, of 4350, same vintage, and it looks they same size as the 4064 and is the same tannish color. Anyone know the color of 4350?

Thanks.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Why would you risk your head for a colour of 4350? My head and my shooting buddys are worth more than 16 bucks.
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  #3  
Old 03-12-2011, 05:53 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: PA
Posts: 1,069
Re: identifying powder

I believe the celluose in powder causes the shiny appearance, when it is new. Deterioration definitely causes a color change, usually gray. Never saw it in a tan appearance. But why take a chance? Spread it in your garden where it will do some good.

As an aside, many years ago, I bought two pounds of stick powder from a friend who found a keg of unmarked powder in his deceased uncle's attic. He thought it was IMR 3031. I wrote to IMR - then owned by DuPont - and dropped a couple kernels in the envelope. Received a letter telling me that it is impossible to identify any powder by visual examination. It can be positively identified by doing a "bomb test" in which a quantity is detonated inside a container (the bomb shell) under water.
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  #4  
Old 03-12-2011, 08:56 AM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 48
Re: identifying powder

Thanks for the response. I don't/didn't have any intention of using the powder in the can that had changed color, unless tan was the normal color. My interest was in finding out if the original color was black, so I could confirm that the loaded rounds were, in fact, 4064 as labelled. If so, then I could use that as a base for new loadings for the 270.

Apparently, from what I have researched, etc. tan is NOT the normal color of 4064. I have also detected that thre was spot rust developing inside the cans, which is also an indicator of the powder going bad.

I still haven't found out what the original color of 4064 or 4350 is. May just have to buy some to find out.
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  #5  
Old 03-12-2011, 09:11 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: PA
Posts: 1,069
Re: identifying powder

Quote:
Originally Posted by ballistx View Post
.

Apparently, from what I have researched, etc. tan is NOT the normal color of 4064. I have also detected that thre was spot rust developing inside the cans, which is also an indicator of the powder going bad.
Correct on both counts.

Using deteriorated powder is not usually dangerous, but will produce erratic results, which is not good for accuracy.
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  #6  
Old 03-12-2011, 11:00 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Winterville, NC
Posts: 1,490
Re: identifying powder

ballistix,
The color for both IMR4064 and IMR4350 is black. Both are "stick" powders in they are long and round in shape.
IMR4350 is slightly bigger in diameter and is .0380" thick. IMR4064 is .0315" thick as meaured by my digital caliper.
Hope this helps. JohnnyK.
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  #7  
Old 03-13-2011, 04:51 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Cheraw S.C.
Posts: 285
Re: identifying powder

you may not want to heare this but you needt to pull the bullets and start over.it seems that you have been away to long to remember.and from what can tell the powder in the can is old but the powder in the loaded cases are good.thats if I read your post right.

just pull the loaded rounds and start with a new pound of powder.you may even want to use new primers.and put the old powder into some plants for food.like most have said your life is means more than an old can of powder.
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