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How "important" are certain details when reloading?

 
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  #57  
Old 09-12-2013, 04:45 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Trophy- the top group and even the mid group will work . with the time short. question is are they repeatable? still 180 partitons? imr-4831 is a good/great powder powder. h-4350 was the most accurate for the 165-168 in nosler manual i believe . a 168 cbt and h-4350 is one i would try. you have 1200 bullets ? what others do you have? a baseline potential for the rifle with an accubond or a match bullet would be good. also challenging is you are firing a light 300 mag, not a 6ppc or 222, much more recoil. i do not have a lead sled . i shoot off a pedistal and sand bag. my brother has one and says it is good for sighting in a 375. besides the light mag rifle; the 9x scope, i personally may or may not be able to tell a difference in my loads with that scope. sorry this does not to have do with weighing cases or de burring flashholes. i compete out ot 1000 yards. i do not de burr flash holes. i do not weigh my lapua cases. i have a rem 700 7mm from 1967 . it does not have a brake. it kicks . it kicks a lot . it shoots real, real good for a factory rifle.
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  #58  
Old 09-12-2013, 04:49 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Hmmm ok is the fore rest where you put your hand tight? I don't shoot with the "sled" but if there is a part loose that could cause some issues. I am also thinking grip how tight are you gripping the stock at the trigger? Maybe try shooting without the "sled" see how your groups look.... Just some thoughts.
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  #59  
Old 09-12-2013, 05:08 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roninflag View Post
Trophy- the top group and even the mid group will work . with the time short. question is are they repeatable? still 180 partitons? imr-4831 is a good/great powder powder. h-4350 was the most accurate for the 165-168 in nosler manual i believe . a 168 cbt and h-4350 is one i would try. you have 1200 bullets ? what others do you have? a baseline potential for the rifle with an accubond or a match bullet would be good. also challenging is you are firing a light 300 mag, not a 6ppc or 222, much more recoil. i do not have a lead sled . i shoot off a pedistal and sand bag. my brother has one and says it is good for sighting in a 375. besides the light mag rifle; the 9x scope, i personally may or may not be able to tell a difference in my loads with that scope. sorry this does not to have do with weighing cases or de burring flashholes. i compete out ot 1000 yards. i do not de burr flash holes. i do not weigh my lapua cases. i have a rem 700 7mm from 1967 . it does not have a brake. it kicks . it kicks a lot . it shoots real, real good for a factory rifle.

I'm still using the 180 partitions. I have about 150 of them left (my other nosler bullets are .223). I'm going to try other bullets and powders after elk season, but for now I want to maximize what I have on hand. I agree that the 9x scope is limiting, but the lead sled helps. The gun straps down to the sled as well so that really keeps the kick down.
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  #60  
Old 09-12-2013, 05:22 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJohnH View Post
Hmmm ok is the fore rest where you put your hand tight? I don't shoot with the "sled" but if there is a part loose that could cause some issues. I am also thinking grip how tight are you gripping the stock at the trigger? Maybe try shooting without the "sled" see how your groups look.... Just some thoughts.
I tightened the fore rest when I first set up and then just use an elevation knob for fine adjustments while shooting but I'll make sure to pay closer attention to all the parts next time out. The folding table is what it is, not the most solid thing in the world but not much more wobbly than even the more expensive folding shooting benches that are sold in outdoor stores. It wouldn't surprise me that's a bit of a factor. I've thought about building a more solid bench that is portable.

Funny you should mention my grip at the trigger. Today I noticed that I was gripping it very tight. I had to make a conscious effort to relax it a little.

I've shot this gun without a lead sled. Shooting a few rounds is ok, but putting 20 rounds through it would not be any fun at all.
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  #61  
Old 09-13-2013, 08:52 AM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJohnH View Post
This is interesting thread as I have been asked many times why I am so "ANAL" when it comes to reloading. My answer is when I squeeze the trigger I know where my bullet is going to hit. ok back to the question, I weigh everything and I do mean everything after triming I weigh the cases, I weigh every bullet and put it in containers with bullets that weigh the same, I weigh every charge of powder and adjust for bullet weight, I weigh primers and put like weighted primers in same weight bullet and cases..... So I guess to answer the question to me all details are important.... A fellow just asked me what caliber and scope, I told him then I got to thinking I would say on here I do those things for my weapons or for someone else if I am loading up some for their weapons....
i do not see how Trophy will see a difference doing any of those things; based on the content of his replies. i drive 136 miles one way to shoot my rifles off a cement bench ( pretty anal) ; it is 30 to 35 degrees hotter there. better bench technique , a higher power scope and a match grade bullet will give him better groups. the rifle has to "slide" exactly the same with each shot. that is harder to do with a light rifle that has some recoil.
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  #62  
Old 09-13-2013, 09:35 AM
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Location: Watkins Glen NY
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roninflag View Post
i do not see how Trophy will see a difference doing any of those things; based on the content of his replies. i drive 136 miles one way to shoot my rifles off a cement bench ( pretty anal) ; it is 30 to 35 degrees hotter there. better bench technique , a higher power scope and a match grade bullet will give him better groups. the rifle has to "slide" exactly the same with each shot. that is harder to do with a light rifle that has some recoil.
"By all means, ask away. I haven't ever been taught to do precision shooting so you might hit on something I'm doing wrong."

@100 yds I am thinking more technique rather than other factors, I shoot from a wooden bench setup in my in-laws and I get what I would call ok groups with my .308. If his technique / or basic shooting skills are off that could cause bigger groups...
Trophy I must have missed what you are shooting, I have also shot heavy recoil weapons off shoulder for 20 rounds and it was no fun.... Yes relaxing and maybe not torquing your wrist etc.... When in doubt go back to basics.... good luck John
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  #63  
Old 09-14-2013, 11:44 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Stockton, Utah
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

My Nosler manual finally came in. Interestingly it showed there most accurate load for the 180 partition at 62 gr of the same powder I'm using. I'm also using Nosler brass. They used a different primer and different gun than I'm using.

The Lyman manual shows the most accurate load being at 69 gr of the same powder I'm using. They use the same gun and same primer, but a different 180 gr bullet and different brass.

I loaded up 3 foul shots at 62 gr using brand new brass, 6 rounds at 62 gr and 6 rounds at 64 gr using once fired brass.

Instead of using the somewhat wobbly folding table, I grabbed a workmate portable workbench to shoot from. It was MUCH more stable.

The first pic is of my foul shots. Ignore the three holes that are totally in the orange, they are foul shots from the last time out. The other three were the first three shots this morning after cleaning the gun.

The second pic is the 62 gr load. I'm very confused as to why they are not only much more spread out than my foul shots, but the POI was also shifted a little.

The third pic is at 64 gr. I'm fully ready to accept that the outlying shot here was a result of either something I did while reloading or my shooting technique. It really bothers me to have one out of 6 shot be that far off and I hope I can get that corrected.

At this point I think I'm going to go with the 64 gr load and start practicing at longer distances unless you guys think I should do more testing. After hunting season I'll buy a scope more suited to long range and then I'll try out some different bullets and powders. There are steel targets set up behind my house that I can shoot at from over 1000 yards if I wanted to.
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