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How "important" are certain details when reloading?

 
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  #43  
Old 08-15-2013, 08:55 AM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Trophyhusband- does your rifle have a recoil pad on it?? did you shoot again??
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  #44  
Old 08-15-2013, 03:44 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roninflag View Post
Trophyhusband- does your rifle have a recoil pad on it?? did you shoot again??
I've been up in the mountains for the last few days so I haven't been out to shoot again yet. My rifle does have a recoil pad on it. For testing purposes though I'm using a lead sled. Last time I only had about a 10 lb sandbag on it, but I'm going to add another sandbag next time out

I do have more rounds loaded up, but there's something I don't like about the deepest seated round. The ogive is just barely outside the case. Considering that the cases I'm using are shorter than the "trim to" length, I'm pretty sure that if I were to load some rounds at that depth using longer cases, the ogive would actually be inside the case mouth. Clearly it is way too deep of a seating depth but the question is, would it still be safe to shoot these rounds as fouling shots or should I just unload them?
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  #45  
Old 08-21-2013, 09:19 AM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

"Factors in Rifle accuracy" parts 1,2,3. 24hourcampfire.com
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  #46  
Old 08-21-2013, 10:49 AM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roninflag View Post
"Factors in Rifle accuracy" parts 1,2,3. 24hourcampfire.com
Thanks for the link.

Had to laugh when I saw in Part II, this in print:
Quote:
Let's look at the body of the chamber first. This directly affects "headspace," a technical term for the tiny gap between bolt-face and cartridge-head after a round's chambered.
There's no rimless or belted bottleneck headspace gauge made anywhere that measures that. Nor is their any such dimension spec'd in SAAMI's info.

That space, folks, is correctly called head clearance. . .according to the industry standard most firearms, ammo and reloading tool companies have suscribed to.

Skimming over the rest of it, it looks pretty good as far as I could tell.
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  #47  
Old 08-21-2013, 11:17 AM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

BartB- thanks. i saw the title and thought they might be relevant. barely even skimmed them. "" my opinion" for Trophy is: lapua (along with norma and nosler ) brass is way precise and anything i do to it will just fowl it up. precision shooting magazine had articles on de burring flash holes and uniforming flash holes. made the groups bigger. nolser brass only varies less than a Grain ! the vertical in the groups is from the lead sled/bench technique. the best group horizontal i believe was 1.2" is good enough for a very long shot on elk. especially with 180 partitions. i personally would not be able to tell much difference in bench testing without putting at least a 4.5-14 ; add one with the cds feature to the it and the rifle/scope are going to be good to 500 or .........
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  #48  
Old 09-10-2013, 11:36 AM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roninflag View Post
i personally would not be able to tell much difference in bench testing without putting at least a 4.5-14
I quoted this because I currently have a Leupold 3-9 and that is what I'll be hunting with this year. This may factor into the answers I get here.

So after a road trip to Alaska and ridiculously hot and dry weather, I've just now been able to go shoot the test rounds I loaded up what seems like forever ago. I loaded OALs of 3.930, 3.890, and 3.850. HOWEVER, the 3.850s were just too short so I only shot the other two lengths. I shot from a bench at 100 yards and shot the round robin style.

The first pic is the 3.930. The numbers in parentheses are the measurements if you were to consider the upper right shot to be a "flyer".

Group- 1.7 (1.25)
Vertical- 1.15 (1.1)
Horizontal- 1.4 (.095)

The second pic is at 3.890. The numbers in parentheses are if you would consider the lower left shot to be a "flyer".

Group- 1.75 (1.17)
Vertical- 1.6 (.85)
Horizontal- 1.3 (1.15)

At this point I'm not sure where to go. One thing to keep in mind is that elk season is only 3 1/2 weeks away and I want to settle on something in enough time to do some long range target practice before then. As is stands right now, I have something I could load up at hunt with. The question is, do I keep chasing the the OAL or do I move on to the powder charge testing? My gut tells me that I should move on to the charge and then when I get a different scope I should go back and further refine the OAL. Thoughts?

As far as powder charge, I've read both to do it in .5gr and 1gr increments. What are the pros and cons of each here? Also, I have a chrono. Will that give me any useful info during the R & D stage, or should I just wait until I settle on a round and then use it to find my muzzle velocity for ballistics calculations?
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How "important" are certain details when reloading?-img_0269.jpg   How "important" are certain details when reloading?-img_0270.jpg  

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  #49  
Old 09-10-2013, 01:47 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Statistically, in my opinion, there's no difference in those two groups as far as their size is concerned.

As far as the incremental charge weight change between loads to test, the smaller the increment, the more shots one must put in each group to make them statistically significant. One whole grain difference is good enough for testing at 100 yards if you shoot 5-shot groups. Half-grain increments need 10-shot groups to make them worthwhile size wise.

Chronographing loads will tell you what they do. Game animals have a hard time distinguishing between bullets smacking them when they go in with 100 fps difference in impact velocity. I think it's important to load for best accuracy and not get concerned about the most accurate load leaving 63 fps slower than the fastest one.
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