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Reloading Techniques For Reloading


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How "important" are certain details when reloading?

 
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  #29  
Old 08-10-2013, 11:47 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Stockton, Utah
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Well, I now have some data.

All OAL measurements are using a comparitor so the distance from head to ogive is consistent. The measurements of the group size is in inches measured with calipers and rounded to the nearest .100.

wind was about 5-8 left to right, but I timed my shots for lulls in the wind so I don't think that was much of a factor.


The first pic is an OAL of 3.960
The group was 2.7
Vertical separation was 2.4
Horizontal separation was 1.4

Second pic was an OAL of 3.950
The group was 1.6
Vertical separation was 1.5
Horizontal separation was 1.3

Third pic is an OAL of 3.940
The group was 1.7
Vertical separation was 1.6
Horizontal separation was 1.2

So what does all this tell me? Should I do another round of testing with OAL's of 3.930, 20, and 10? Will there be a trend towards a tighter group or could the grouping be just about anything until I hit that sweet spot?

I used brand new Nosler brass. Should I use 18 more new cases for the next round, or should I use these that are already formed to my gun's chamber? I have a full length resizing die so how do I set up the die to bump back the shoulder .001?

From looking at the pictures, it's clear that my scope is about 1 MOA to the right. Would it be ok to make that adjustment now or should I just leave it alone until I get the load developed?

If I'm going to shoot again in the next couple days, should I clean the rifle?
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  #30  
Old 08-10-2013, 12:02 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by trophyhusband View Post
Thanks for the response. The max case length is 2.850 with a "trim to" length of 2.840. Since quite a few of my cases are shorter than the trim to length, would you suggest trimming the long ones to 2.840 and let the short ones "grow" with use? How much shorter than 2.840 can I use at this stage?

Can you tell me where you found the info on the powder charge? I have a Speer manual that lists 66, 68, and 70 gr of 4831 and a Lyman manual that lists 62-69 gr with 69 being their most accurate.
Latest Nosler manual
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  #31  
Old 08-10-2013, 12:18 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Stockton, Utah
Posts: 68
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sully2 View Post
Latest Nosler manual
Thanks. Since I have about 1200 various Nosler bullets and some Nosler brass it would make sense for me to get the Nosler manual.
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  #32  
Old 08-10-2013, 12:48 PM
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Posts: 884
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

To get decisive data, IMO you really need to test seating depth in larger intervals. I believe it noteworthy that the Berger seating depth test specifies .040 increments. I have used that test with many other bullets, including Nosler Partitions, with very good results.

You don't say what distance you were shooting. I recommend doing your initial testing at 100 yards. Once you have your final load figured out, confirm it at longer distances.

When you shoot your test groups, hang one target for each group you plan to shoot. Shoot your targets/loads in round robin fashion to more evenly distribute your error (fire one round from group 1 at target one, one round from group 2 at target 2, and so on).

You fired enough rounds that you should clean your rifle before your next set of tests. Make sure to load some extra rounds for fouling shots before your next test.

While testing, it is not important to be dead on in your scope adjustments. There is no point in adjusting your scope until you settle on a final load. Because your POI is likely to change as you go through load development, trying to adjust your scope for a dead on POA/POI will result in you chasing your tail instead of learning something about your rifle/load combination. Use you fouling shots to get in the ballpark and stop there until you have completed load development. Zero with your final load.

You don't need to use virgin brass each time. You should be able to develop a good load using the same cases that you started with.
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  #33  
Old 08-10-2013, 12:56 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

I think groups 2 and 3 are virtually the same.

Both the above are close enough to group 1 that the probability of them being smaller to a good confidence level is too close.

In other words, statistically they're all close enough to be equal.
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  #34  
Old 08-10-2013, 12:58 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

I think groups 2 and 3 are virtually the same.

Both the above are close enough to group 1 that the probability of them being smaller to a good confidence level is too close.

In other words, statistically they're all close enough to be equal.

Regarding the scope's zero, they're a bit to the right which is quite normal when testing a rifle from a bench while holding it against one's shoulder compared to standing, sitting or prone field positions' zeros. I wouldn't change anything yet.
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  #35  
Old 08-10-2013, 03:06 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

at this point i would reshoot the loads with the smallest group at the same distance. then shoot the load that displays similar grouping at the max distance you intend to shoot. finally work with the loads that displays the best group at both distances.
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