Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Reloading

Reloading Techniques For Reloading


Reply

How "important" are certain details when reloading?

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #15  
Old 08-08-2013, 07:14 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Stockton, Utah
Posts: 68
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MudRunner2005 View Post
To answer your question in a very legit and simplified response.....Everything is important when reloading. There are no minor details that should be left out, overlooked, or skipped. That's how people end up blowing up a gun, and hurting themselves.
"Important" may not have been the best word to use. Some of the details have a greater effect on accuracy though and, being a beginner, I'm just trying to get a feel for what tolerances I should be looking for at this stage of the game. I hope I didn't give the impression that I'm looking to cut corners.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-08-2013, 07:19 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Stockton, Utah
Posts: 68
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shooter00 View Post
When developing a load, the more things are consistent, the easier a time you'll have at finding that honey load.

I'd sort out the longest cases, all being either new or once fired and trim them all to the trim to length. You can always use the shorter ones for production, they'll be accurate enough to kill. Trim, chamfer, debur, uniform all the R&D cases, making everything as uniform as you can.
This makes a lot of sense and sounds like the best plan for me.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-08-2013, 10:00 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 438
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Have found the best accuracy by controlling neck tension and runout of loaded round.


Weighing brass is ok, but does not give the true internal dimension of each case. I usually use the bottom & top 10 % of weight sorted brass as "barrel warmers" or fouling shots.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 08-08-2013, 11:52 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Stockton, Utah
Posts: 68
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roninflag View Post
Trophy- you say what caliber . you do not say what rifle/scope. i like the nosler partition for hunting. the last elk i killed was with a 180 partition. they do not group as well as others ( no matter what details you do) still they are great for hunting. use WLRM , 9.5M OR CCI250 primers. weight sorting the brass may help with the vertical . 1.25 moa is plenty for elk. i have rifles that do real good ( .5-.6) but do not do as well at 400.
It's a Remington Model 721. The scope I currently have on it is a Leupold VX-II 3x9, probably not the best for long range but it's what I have for the time being.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 08-09-2013, 05:21 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Tucson Az
Posts: 1,096
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Trophy,

I think you will do fine making your first loads for this rifle. You asked the procedure with powder charges and seating depth.

This is what I suggest: Choose the seating depth that will fit and feed from the magazine AND not touch the rifling. You might want to take some of your shortest cases and make a few dummy rounds to test the feeding. After you have established a workable COAL (cartridge overall length) then make a series of 4-6 loaded cases with different powder charges. I think for this size case 1 grain increments will be fine. Start low and work up to the highest powder suggested by a loading book like Nosler's or the powder manufacturer's data.

If you are not happy with the groups size you could alter seating depth. Take the tightest group and make more loaded ammo with bullets seated more deeply in .005 increments. This is a real pain if you don't have a competition seating die. It doesn't always work but generally as you shoot incrementally deeper seated bullets you may begin to see a trend in groups size. I would think you would begin to see the group size change within 5 or 6 seating depth increments. Once you find a better shooting seating depth you must be able to set the seating die to that depth accurately. If you don't have a bullet seating depth comparator or similar device you are wasting your time. You can make one or buy one but it would be essential to making accurate seating depths as well as later when you setup your seating die in the future.

Two versions of comparators:

http://www.sinclairintl.com/reloadin...prod34014.aspx

You could make one of these: http://www.sinclairintl.com/reloadin...prod34262.aspx
You need a drill size a few thousandths smaller than .308".

It wasn't mentioned but your rifle should be sound. The action screws should be tight, as should the scope rings and bases. Barrel should be clean. Then your load work up won't be tainted by performance issues caused by the rifle.

Good shooting! Come back and share your results.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 08-09-2013, 07:36 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 746
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Here are some details that I have found to be important:

1. Consult multiple sources for your load data. This will aid in choosing an optimum powder and in getting an idea of where your max load should be.

2. Choose the slowest burning/highest load density powder that is practical for your planned combination. For most applications involving accuracy, I have had my best results with extruded type propellants rather than ball type propellants.

3. Whatever brass you use, make sure that you have enough for testing and to load the desired number of rounds after you settle on your final load. Ditto on brand and type of primer. Staying within the same lot of powder is desireable here, too. Some powders have problems with lot-to-lot consistency, so be careful when going to the next can of powder.

4. Using a starting load, determine the optimum seating depth for your desired bullet in your rifle. Do that by following the instructions found in the Getting the Best Precision and Accuracy from Berger VLD Bullets in Your Rifle sticky posted at the top of this forum. I have found that procedure to work with any bullet. Once you have determined optimum seating depth, you can experiment with powders and primers. The best seating depth with a given bullet will remain a constant.

5. After determining optimum seating depth, do your powder charge workup in whatever way makes sense to you. Some people do ladder tests, others work up to max in .5 grain increments, some use the OCW (optimum charge weight) method, etc. Some people shoot 3 shot groups, some 5 shot groups, some 10 shot groups. Whatever floats you boat. Regardless of how you do it, HAND WEIGH ALL OF YOUR POWDER CHARGES!

There are other things people do in addition to the above. A lot of the extra steps are things copied from benchrest shooters. IMO, most of the benchrest loading techniques do little or nothing for you if you are shooting a factory rifle with a factory barrel.

As you gain experience, you can always tweak your loading technique and experiment with various things. That's part of the journey for most of us. Starting with a solid basic technique will pay dividends as you progress.

GOOD LUCK!
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 08-09-2013, 08:36 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Alabama
Posts: 4,519
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by trophyhusband View Post
"Important" may not have been the best word to use. Some of the details have a greater effect on accuracy though and, being a beginner, I'm just trying to get a feel for what tolerances I should be looking for at this stage of the game. I hope I didn't give the impression that I'm looking to cut corners.
Thanks for clarifying, now I understand what you were asking.

What I've found to be the 3 most important factors in reloading are:

1) identical powder charge
2) bullet seating depth
3) neck-tension on the bullet.

Also, you will get more accuracy out of once-fired brass through your rifle than you will with new brass, as it will have fire-formed to your chamber.
__________________
"I'm just a peckerwood who lives in the hills with too many guns..." - Bob Lee Swagger

"Give me a minute...I'm good. Give me an hour...I'm great. Give me 6 months...And I'm unbeatable." - Col. Hannibal Smith

Ignore everything I say, because I have a reading comprehension and memory problem...

Quote:
Originally Posted by WildRose View Post
The 284 is to the STW what a tricycle is to a Ninja.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Current Poll
Have You Ever Backpack Hunted?
YES - 62.11%
967 Votes
NO - 37.89%
590 Votes
Total Votes: 1,557
You may not vote on this poll.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC