Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Reloading

Reloading Techniques For Reloading


Reply

How "important" are certain details when reloading?

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #8  
Old 08-08-2013, 07:29 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,113
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Back in the 1950's when high quality match bullets were finally available, folks shooting the .300 H&H in competition at the longer ranges got best accuracy doing the following:

Handload new cases sorted to 1 grain spread in weight, no prepping of any kind needed, 69 to 70 grains of IMR4350 (2/10ths grain spread) with 180-gr. bullets or 66 to 67 grains with 200-gr. bullets, seat bullets out to just touch the lands. Sub MOA accuracy at 1000 yards was easily attained with a properly built rifle. Sometimes new cases need to be resized to uniform the neck dimensions.

Reloading fired cases, full length size fired cases in a die without an expander ball but its neck diameter about .002" smaller than a loaded round's neck, use a die that sized the case body all the way to the belt (Innovative Technologies - Reloading Equipment), set fired case shoulders back about .002", same powder and bullet data. Same accuracy as with new cases.

Regarding case prepping and powders.........

As long as neck wall thickness spread's less than .001", turning necks ain't needed.

Case length can vary .005" and it doesn't matter as far as accuracy goes.

Nothing need be done to primer pockets nor flash holes. Your choice of primer makes a bigger difference than prepping the back end of the case. Wolf/Tula large rifle primers seem to be excellent these days.

Many folks tried 4831 but it never produced quite as good of accuracy as 4350. Yes, 4831 puts bullets out a bit faster with the same peak pressure but the bullets didn't land on target as close together as what 4350 did.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-08-2013, 08:08 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Alabama
Posts: 4,481
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

To answer your question in a very legit and simplified response.....Everything is important when reloading. There are no minor details that should be left out, overlooked, or skipped. That's how people end up blowing up a gun, and hurting themselves.
__________________
"I'm just a peckerwood who lives in the hills with too many guns..." - Bob Lee Swagger

"Give me a minute...I'm good. Give me an hour...I'm great. Give me 6 months...And I'm unbeatable." - Col. Hannibal Smith

Ignore everything I say, because I have a reading comprehension and memory problem...

Quote:
Originally Posted by WildRose View Post
The 284 is to the STW what a tricycle is to a Ninja.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-08-2013, 08:34 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 17
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Time Killer View Post
I've got a question, I'm somewhat new to this myself. I was told to weigh my brass. Ok great, but now what? Obviously I can load them separately, but should I be adjusting my charge based on this. Confused. Made no sense to me.
From what I understand, it's a volume thing. Separating cases into equally weighing groups should keep the interior capacity relatively consistant. If I weighed out 100 cases, I'd take the largest group of the same weight (+/- a tenth of a grain or so) and use those for load development.

I guess it's assumed that the difference in case weight is a result of a difference in wall thickness. If everything is to the same spec on the outside of the case from resizing and trimming, then the interior volume would be effected by thicker or thinner walls. This can change burn times and pressures, leading to anomalies in accuracy. I've never chased that tail, not shooting BR and needing gnat's ass tight groups.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08-08-2013, 08:49 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,113
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shooter00 View Post
From what I understand, it's a volume thing. Separating cases into equally weighing groups should keep the interior capacity relatively consistant. If I weighed out 100 cases, I'd take the largest group of the same weight (+/- a tenth of a grain or so) and use those for load development.
I've not seen any significant difference in accuracy of 30 caliber belted magnum cases in the 230 grain weight range varying 2 grains or 2/10ths grain. Both have shot sub MOA at 1000 yards for 15 or 20 shot test groups. That's as good as what the long range benchresters get sorting cases to exact weights.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-08-2013, 08:54 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: az
Posts: 2,154
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Trophy- you say what caliber . you do not say what rifle/scope. i like the nosler partition for hunting. the last elk i killed was with a 180 partition. they do not group as well as others ( no matter what details you do) still they are great for hunting. use WLRM , 9.5M OR CCI250 primers. weight sorting the brass may help with the vertical . 1.25 moa is plenty for elk. i have rifles that do real good ( .5-.6) but do not do as well at 400.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-08-2013, 09:20 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 17
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart B View Post
I've not seen any significant difference in accuracy of 30 caliber belted magnum cases in the 230 grain weight range varying 2 grains or 2/10ths grain. Both have shot sub MOA at 1000 yards for 15 or 20 shot test groups. That's as good as what the long range benchresters get sorting cases to exact weights.
Works for me, I've never gone to those lengths to squeeze every last bit of accuracy. Good to know it's nominal at best.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-08-2013, 06:48 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Stockton, Utah
Posts: 68
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart B View Post
B

Many folks tried 4831 but it never produced quite as good of accuracy as 4350. Yes, 4831 puts bullets out a bit faster with the same peak pressure but the bullets didn't land on target as close together as what 4350 did.

Interesting. I went with the 4831 because that's what the reloading manuals I have used. I don't know enough about the differences in powders to branch out from that right now, but once I get through this hunting season I'll do some more R & D.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Current Poll
Do you plan to buy a new custom rifle in the next 12 months?
YES - Of course - 73.04%
1,544 Vote
NO - wife/girlfriend won't let me. - 26.96%
570 Votes
Total Votes: 2,114
You may not vote on this poll.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC