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Reloading Techniques For Reloading


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How "important" are certain details when reloading?

 
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  #85  
Old 09-18-2013, 03:12 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by trophyhusband View Post
When you say "mechanical", do you mean the mechanics of my shooting technique? If that's the case, what could cause that? A lot of times I can tell when I've pulled a shot as soon as the trigger breaks, but if I'm pulling shots without realizing it that's a problem.
the rifle has to slide the same each time. lead sled may have some error in the way the rifle slides.
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  #86  
Old 09-18-2013, 05:16 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

[QUOTE=trophyhusband;853214]When you say "mechanical", do you mean the mechanics of my shooting technique? If that's the case, what could cause that? A lot of times I can tell when I've pulled a shot as soon as the trigger breaks, but if I'm pulling shots without realizing it that's a problem.[/QUOTE It could be you or the way the sled reacts when the rifle fires. If you are do exactly the same thing in preping and firing it then it has to be the weapon or the sled. I prefer to shoulder my rifle and put it on a rest rather than a sled type holder, it allows me to put the rifle back inline and look thru the scope to make each shot.
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  #87  
Old 09-18-2013, 05:36 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Trophy- so you have a sonic cleaner to keep your brass volume the same. the benchrest guys who shoot 6ppc do not do that, and their brass volume is much much smaller, believe me it only holds 28-30 grain of n-133 . you have chrono - because "it keeps you safe because long range loads are hot loads". interesting.
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  #88  
Old 09-19-2013, 03:21 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Wow. Nice long thread. My experience:

1. Use the lead sled after mounting a new scope on new rifle. I only use the lead sled on my .375 RUM, 300 RUM and other kickers. Put it away after that. The lead sled has too much bounce in vertical, horizontal and about 4 other dimensions to shoot groups that matter. You are inducing additional variables into your groups that cannot be eliminated. (I love my lead sled, but only for this.)
2. Use a front pedestal and rear pinching ear type sandbag or lead filled bag to shoot groups. Use this on the ground or on cement bench. No card tables or tailgates of trucks, please. This will eliminate most of the variables induced by lead sled. You do not need to spend a ton on a front pedestal. Any that has a front bag that reasonably fits your forearm is better than lead sled. I bet this combo cuts your groups in half. 3 shot groups to start to find some loads, 4 shot groups next on the good ones, then maybe 5 shot groups on your 2 best loads.
3. Save up or sell your 721 next year and get a newer Remington 700 action in caliber of your choice with the longest barrel you can afford. Even a used SPS or similar will shoot. (Case in point...son's new Reminton 700 varmint in .308 shoots .5" groups all day long and it only cost $425 at Sportsmans Warehouse. More cases in point....every 300 RUM in a Remington 700 action...I have worked up over 7 of them to date...can be made to shoot .5" groups. Worst has been .75" groups. All of them like Nosler 180 Accubonds, RE-25 and Fed primers).
4. When you burn out your barrel on a Remington 700 action, every decent gunsmith can chamber a new Krieger or other barrel on it that will continue to shoot .5" groups. Each Remington 700 action will last through several lifetimes.
5. If you can afford next year, get a stainless or XCR Remington rifle. It will go nicely with your Krieger barrel after you have burned out the factory barrel.
6. A scope with a little more reach will greatly cut your group size down. If you can obtain a 14 or 20x scope etc, so much the better. (Not necessary but fyi, we use old 36x cheap fixed power scopes work up loads, then remount our "hunting" scopes.)
7. Brass type or prep or weighing, bullet type or brand, powder or primer will not matter unless you start with the above.
8. Accubonds, Ballistic Tips, Combined Technology from Nosler will all tend to be much more consistent in the groups than Partitions. You will get flyers with Partitions and I do not care if you are shooting a $4,000 Bat Action 1k rifle. However, Partitions will kill an elk just as dead as any other.
9. For another weather variable I would eliminate would be on the powder. Use Extreme powders. H4831 etc. see Hodgon website. (That said, I use RE-25 on my RUMS because it shoots tiny groups.)
10. If you are using the 300 H&H for nostalgic purposes, go for it. I do that with my Dad's .308 with an 18" barrel and totally get that. Otherwise, next year....there is a reason the military snipers use 300 Win mags on Remington 700 actions...they shoot.
11. Make sure all the screws on your action, scope rings and mounts are tight.
12. After you find your load for the 300 H&H, go shoot at something at 400 yards as you would an elk. Milk jugs, 2 liter bottle etc. How did you do? That 9 power scope kinda makes it more difficult. That said, an elk shoulder is pretty huge at 400 yards even on 9 power. I hope you shoot a record book elk if you have not already.

There. I feel better. 12 steps to help one of my bretheren.

Best,

Somerumbum
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  #89  
Old 09-19-2013, 04:26 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

the sonic cleaner (100$) - the reason i clean the cases is too remove the case lube i applied to resize. there needs to be friction between the brass and chamber wall to avoid excessive pressure on the locking lugs. this can be done many ways. a rag; at benchrest matches commonly a shirt tail ; i suppose the dish /clothes ?washer ( not sure on that one). the chrono (100$) I use at the VERY Very end when i have developed a very good load to determine FPS for the cds/kenton knobb. also it can be used to determine extreme spread if you are shooting far . the ES is critical for long range. The Chrono does not measure PSI or CUP. there is 200$ add 150$ for the scope you have $350 . the higher power of a 4.5 -14 would save me time and components ( $$$ ) in range testiing and load developement. also when or if I range a spiker at 429 yd it would give me a lot more confidence on the shot(that conifidence ( $$$$).
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  #90  
Old 09-19-2013, 08:27 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

im not a bench rest shooter don't shoot comp. but I do shoot a lot, elk season is just around the corner for me. if I were working out this rifle I wouldn't worry about most if any of the case prep concerns other than my primer seating depth. as long as the cases are clean and dry when I seated them in the bore for a 400yd shot they will get there. I also wouldn't be using a sled to shoot from, light rifles don't respond well to sleds or any restrained shooting devices. for bench testing purposes I use a simple shooting bag. if you can match the factory loads you were using with your reloads call it good. the bullet you are using isn't a target bullet. don't expect .250 groups. any of the loads you took pic. of centered on an elks shoulder would hit him at 400yrs, if you do your part. go hunting have fun.
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  #91  
Old 09-20-2013, 04:52 AM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SomeRumbum View Post
Wow. Nice long thread. My experience:

3. Save up or sell your 721 next year and get a newer Remington 700 action in caliber of your choice with the longest barrel you can afford.
This makes no sense. There is nothing about the 700 action that makes it more inherently accurate than its predecessor. The primary differences between the two are cosmetic changes and a different trigger. A trigger from a 700 can be adapted to work on a 721 if that is deemed necessary.

Everything that a gunsmith is going to do to a 700 applies equally to a 721. There is nothing especially different or exotic about the 700. Moreover, there are not yet any indications that there is a problem with the OP's rifle. At this point, the accuracy issues appear to be shooter related or ammo related.

Even if, for instance, the barrel turns out to need replacement, there is no reason to replace the rifle. A good barrel can be fitted to a 721 just as easily as it can be fitted to a 700 and the end result of a properly fitted quality barrel will be no more or less accurate on either rifle.
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