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Reloading Techniques For Reloading


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How "important" are certain details when reloading?

 
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  #78  
Old 09-17-2013, 08:49 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Watkins Glen NY
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

That looks interesting, although I think the custom match grade dies by hornady will do the same thing and they are less expensive, the wilsons are $66.00 ea. I generally start the seat and turn the round to check for drag in the seater and then drive it home. so far no misalignment... Trophy's last targets were closer except for the one flier which could be mechanical rather than ammo.... I may look into one of those Wilson in-line seats but I am anal....lol
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  #79  
Old 09-18-2013, 09:19 AM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Most benchrest shooters use a wilson in-line seater. most benchrest shooters( 100-300 yards) do not weigh their powder charge. There is a long post on using a Lead sled on Predatormasters.com. one who reccomended getting/using a Farley front rest instead. ( many benchrest match winners use it)
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  #80  
Old 09-18-2013, 09:24 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Stockton, Utah
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FAL Shot View Post
Buy a sonic cleaner and learn how to use it.

Buy Nosler, Norma or Lapua cases.

Winchester, Federal and R-P brass will have a higher cull rate and shorter life,

Some rifles that have perfectly aligned bores and chambers can tolerate immense bullet jump, while others cannot. Know your rifle.

Buy a chronograph and learn how to use it.

I always factory crimp to add a standard amount of startup resistance. Also adds safety as it prevents bullet setback if dropped.

Forget temp sensitive powders if hunting in varied conditions. I learned this the hard way. Losing velocity on a cold day not only drops the impact point, it changes the timing and changes the bullet pattern, almost always for the worse unless your load was a bit too hot to begin with. I just use Hodgdon Extreme powders and got rid of the problem.

Buy a good case trimmer. Double important if you factory crimp, as it keeps the crimp length consistent as well.
Got a sonic cleaner and I've been using it. I

have 50 Nosler brass and that's all I've been using so far but I also have a couple hundred Winchester brass.

So far I haven't found a lot of difference in different seating depths, but I'll revisit this with match bullets after hunting season.

I have a chrono that is still in the box, but I'll be taking it next time out.

Is a factory crimp a separate die or is it something I can do with my seating die?

What powders are temp sensitive? I hope that I won't be hunting in extreme temps but it does get extremely cold here in the winter and I will still want to shoot through the winter.

I've got a case trimmer. Would you trim every case to the exact same length every time? I've been measuring my cases and only using cases that are between 2.832 and 2.838.
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  #81  
Old 09-18-2013, 09:31 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Stockton, Utah
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roninflag View Post
no one has suggested using a wilson in-line seater.
What is this? I'm probably not going to buy any more reloading stuff for a while, my wife is getting a little annoyed with my spending on this. I got a ton of stuff from my dad but I've also bought tons of stuff. Here's my reloading bench.
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  #82  
Old 09-18-2013, 09:35 AM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJohnH View Post
Trophy's last targets were closer except for the one flier which could be mechanical rather than ammo....
When you say "mechanical", do you mean the mechanics of my shooting technique? If that's the case, what could cause that? A lot of times I can tell when I've pulled a shot as soon as the trigger breaks, but if I'm pulling shots without realizing it that's a problem.
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  #83  
Old 09-18-2013, 10:46 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: az
Posts: 2,410
Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roninflag View Post
Most benchrest shooters use a wilson in-line seater. most benchrest shooters( 100-300 yards) do not weigh their powder charge. There is a long post on using a Lead sled on Predatormasters.com. one who reccomended getting/using a Farley front rest instead. ( many benchrest match winners use it)
Trophy- one poster said "everything" helps. some are not revelavant to what you are doing ; too expensive or require a lot set up and support tools and instruments like -neck turning for instance . the inline seater helps make more concentric rounds . the farley rest is very relevant to help with bench technique and very very expensive. and you would have to buy and mount a special fore end on your rifle. so from my stand point for your pupose NOT everything helps. PM to be sent
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  #84  
Old 09-18-2013, 11:42 AM
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Location: az
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

extreme powders have a coating applied that makes them less temp sensitive. varget , h4831, h4350 ...................others . imr-4831 not extreme, but a great powder for 180's acording to the nosler manual.
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