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Reloading Berger Bullets

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How "important" are certain details when reloading?

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  #64  
Unread 09-15-2013, 10:41 AM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Really like the top target. PM
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  •   #65  
    Unread 09-15-2013, 11:11 AM
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    Join Date: Aug 2013
    Location: Stockton, Utah
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    Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by roninflag View Post
    Really like the top target. PM
    I like the top target too, but the problem is that those are foul shots from two different days, at two different loads, and of varying bullet seating depths. (I fine tune the seating depth while loading the fouling shots). Maybe the barrel shoots better cold.
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      #66  
    Unread 09-15-2013, 11:11 AM
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    Join Date: Sep 2013
    Location: Simpsonville, SC
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    Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

    In one word, consistency is the single most important thing in reloading - period.

    Clean brass
    Trim to consistent COAL less than max length, I sort based on COAL - with OAL being consistent, the COAL will impact how much of bullet is actually seated into the brass - neck tension can become a factor
    I trim neck thickness to 0.012 for uniformity so bullet seats with concentricity
    For bullet seating depth, use a fire-formed case from your gun. Back off OAL .010" to seat the bullet just off the lands. You may want to start with 0.020" of lands and go from there.
    Understanding headspace is helpful
    I load 5-6 rounds per combo to take to the range
    Use primer pocket uniformer and deburring tool on each fired case
    I weigh all cases and sort, likewise with bullets
    I use competition dies to get precision - worth the extra few bucks
    For powder, I start with one brand based on reloading guide and work up different loads varying the grains in 0.5 grain increments

    Hope this helps.
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      #67  
    Unread 09-15-2013, 02:47 PM
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    Join Date: Oct 2010
    Location: Montana Plains
    Posts: 289
    Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

    Buy a sonic cleaner and learn how to use it. Clean brass is accurate brass with stable internal volume over time. Adding some residue each shot is NOT consistency.

    Buy Nosler, Norma or Lapua cases. Sellier & Bellot loaded ammo makes a good alternative, as you can immediately fireform the brass and trim to your standard length. Virgin brass and fireformed brass take a slightly different powder load for the same velocity.

    Winchester, Federal and R-P brass will have a higher cull rate and shorter life, so Lapua and Norma and Nosler isn't that much more expensive. Old Winchester brass was very good. The new stuff isn't the same. The way to get Nosler brass is shoot the Trophy Grade ammo and it is immediately fireformed without that needed extra expensive and you can buy enough and just hunt with that a while, or go out varmint shooting. I got mine for less than the cost of brass and bullets if buying components separately. Nosler sometimes runs factory direct sales on ammo, but not during times like today. Nosler brass is mostly made by Norma.

    Some rifles that have perfectly aligned bores and chambers can tolerate immense bullet jump, while others cannot. Know your rifle.

    Buy a chronograph and learn how to use it. Keeps you safe when working with hot loads. Long range loads tend to be hot loads.

    Case capacity is important. R-P vs. Norma brass changes the powder load about 0.5 grain in my rifle. Fill cases with water, weigh about 5 of them, empty and full. Subtract the difference and divide by number of cases weighed. If running compressed loads, variations in case capacity affect compression quite a bit. Loads where you have less than 90% fill will not matter as much.

    I always factory crimp to add a standard amount of startup resistance. Also adds safety as it prevents bullet setback if dropped.

    Forget temp sensitive powders if hunting in varied conditions. I learned this the hard way. Losing velocity on a cold day not only drops the impact point, it changes the timing and changes the bullet pattern, almost always for the worse unless your load was a bit too hot to begin with. I just use Hodgdon Extreme powders and got rid of the problem.

    Buy a good case trimmer. Double important if you factory crimp, as it keeps the crimp length consistent as well.
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      #68  
    Unread 09-15-2013, 03:54 PM
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    Join Date: Feb 2006
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    Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HiTechRob View Post
    In one word, consistency is the single most important thing in reloading - period.

    Clean brass
    Trim to consistent COAL less than max length, I sort based on COAL - with OAL being consistent, the COAL will impact how much of bullet is actually seated into the brass - neck tension can become a factor
    I trim neck thickness to 0.012 for uniformity so bullet seats with concentricity
    For bullet seating depth, use a fire-formed case from your gun. Back off OAL .010" to seat the bullet just off the lands. You may want to start with 0.020" of lands and go from there.
    Understanding headspace is helpful
    I load 5-6 rounds per combo to take to the range
    Use primer pocket uniformer and deburring tool on each fired case
    I weigh all cases and sort, likewise with bullets
    I use competition dies to get precision - worth the extra few bucks
    For powder, I start with one brand based on reloading guide and work up different loads varying the grains in 0.5 grain increments

    Hope this helps.
    don't listen to this guy. you already said you are using nosler brass- it is already weight sorted well beyong what what is needed for precision. do not beburr the flash holes with nosler brass that has been proven to make groups bigger. not sure how he trims neck thicknees but it requires a special neck turning tool. according to sierra bullets you only turn case necks if you have a tightneck chamber. i am sure on a rem 721 you do not have a tight neck chamber .
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      #69  
    Unread 09-15-2013, 04:03 PM
    Platinum Member
     
    Join Date: Feb 2006
    Location: az
    Posts: 3,211
    Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FAL Shot View Post
    Buy a sonic cleaner and learn how to use it. Clean brass is accurate brass with stable internal volume over time. Adding some residue each shot is NOT consistency.

    Buy Nosler, Norma or Lapua cases. Sellier & Bellot loaded ammo makes a good alternative, as you can immediately fireform the brass and trim to your standard length. Virgin brass and fireformed brass take a slightly different powder load for the same velocity.

    Winchester, Federal and R-P brass will have a higher cull rate and shorter life, so Lapua and Norma and Nosler isn't that much more expensive. Old Winchester brass was very good. The new stuff isn't the same. The way to get Nosler brass is shoot the Trophy Grade ammo and it is immediately fireformed without that needed extra expensive and you can buy enough and just hunt with that a while, or go out varmint shooting. I got mine for less than the cost of brass and bullets if buying components separately. Nosler sometimes runs factory direct sales on ammo, but not during times like today. Nosler brass is mostly made by Norma.

    Some rifles that have perfectly aligned bores and chambers can tolerate immense bullet jump, while others cannot. Know your rifle.

    Buy a chronograph and learn how to use it. Keeps you safe when working with hot loads. Long range loads tend to be hot loads.

    Case capacity is important. R-P vs. Norma brass changes the powder load about 0.5 grain in my rifle. Fill cases with water, weigh about 5 of them, empty and full. Subtract the difference and divide by number of cases weighed. If running compressed loads, variations in case capacity affect compression quite a bit. Loads where you have less than 90% fill will not matter as much.

    I always factory crimp to add a standard amount of startup resistance. Also adds safety as it prevents bullet setback if dropped.

    Forget temp sensitive powders if hunting in varied conditions. I learned this the hard way. Losing velocity on a cold day not only drops the impact point, it changes the timing and changes the bullet pattern, almost always for the worse unless your load was a bit too hot to begin with. I just use Hodgdon Extreme powders and got rid of the problem.

    Buy a good case trimmer. Double important if you factory crimp, as it keeps the crimp length consistent as well.
    trophy already said he was using nosler brass and a chrono. trophy will not see a difference in accurracy by trimming his cases. crimping will not help accuracy. extreme powders are a good idea.
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      #70  
    Unread 09-15-2013, 05:10 PM
    Junior Member
     
    Join Date: Sep 2013
    Location: Simpsonville, SC
    Posts: 19
    Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by roninflag View Post
    don't listen to this guy. you already said you are using nosler brass- it is already weight sorted well beyong what what is needed for precision. do not beburr the flash holes with nosler brass that has been proven to make groups bigger. not sure how he trims neck thicknees but it requires a special neck turning tool. according to sierra bullets you only turn case necks if you have a tightneck chamber. i am sure on a rem 721 you do not have a tight neck chamber .
    Wow, a real know it all. The gentleman asked what we thought were our important things we considered in reloading. Bless your heart, sir. You simply show your ignorance with your comments. Not sure how he neck turns? Lol!
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