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How "important" are certain details when reloading?

 
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  #1  
Old 08-07-2013, 01:27 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Stockton, Utah
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How "important" are certain details when reloading?

I'm about to work up an elk hunting round for my 300 H&H and this will be my first time reloading rifle rounds. I put "important" in quotes because it is such a subjective thing. By important, i mean, how much effect do certain details have on accuracy? While I want to improve in the long run, my current goal is to be able to hit the vitals on an elk from 400 yards. That means that for me, something that may give me a .1 MOA improvement may not be that important right now (although it will be in the future).

For bullets I have chosen 180gr Nosler partitions. I have always in the past bought factory ammo with that bullet for both my 300 and 30-06 and have been happy with the results so being new to this, I went with what I was familiar with.

For powder I chose IMR-4831and for primers I chose WLR's based on the Lyman Reloading Handbook, which used the same rifle I have for their testing.

My focus and my questions right now mainly concern the brass. Remember, this is in the context of my current goals. Just to quantify it, lets say that 1.25 MOA is acceptable for the time being. I know there are a lot of variables and that no one here can give exact numbers but I'm hoping for some ballpark figures or a little guidance as to what to focus on to start with.

Case length: The length of my brass varies from about 2.825 to 2.850. How much should I separate it, variations of .005? .010? .015?

Weight: I haven't weighed the brass yet so I don't know how much it varies, but at this level, how much variation in weight is acceptable?

Primer pocket: Do I need to get a primer pocket uniformer or will just cleaning them get me to my goal?

Flash hole: Should I bother de-burring the inside of the flash hole?

Jump to lands: For testing purposes I want to make up 3 or 4 different OAL's but where should I start and what intervals should I do? .010, .020, .030 off? .015, .030, .045 off? .020, .040, .060 off?

Powder charge: My thoughts are to start with 65gr until I work out the jump to lands and then work up from there. Any input in this area would be greatly appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 08-07-2013, 02:27 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Dont know what case length is called out??....but TRIM the long ones to match the length of the short ones. De-burr th inside and outside of the case mouths

Ive never weighed an empty case in my life.......Im not after bughole accuracy

Get primer pocket tools....BOTH a brush AND a uniformer. They dont cost that much $$

Deburr flash holes. Ya need to do it once at least

Jump to lands. I insert a slug and use blue Sharpie or MarksALot to color the slug......run it in the chamber and raise and lower the bold ( NOT withdraw the bolt) and you will see a small circular mark on the slug where the rifling starts. Measure it and back off .020.

With 4831 loads are 62; 64; 66 grains...with 66 being a MAX load but with 64 grains being their most ACCURATE load!!! Ya might try 6 or so rounds at 62 grains and work up.
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Old 08-07-2013, 05:43 PM
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sully2 View Post
Dont know what case length is called out??....but TRIM the long ones to match the length of the short ones. De-burr th inside and outside of the case mouths



With 4831 loads are 62; 64; 66 grains...with 66 being a MAX load but with 64 grains being their most ACCURATE load!!! Ya might try 6 or so rounds at 62 grains and work up.
Thanks for the response. The max case length is 2.850 with a "trim to" length of 2.840. Since quite a few of my cases are shorter than the trim to length, would you suggest trimming the long ones to 2.840 and let the short ones "grow" with use? How much shorter than 2.840 can I use at this stage?

Can you tell me where you found the info on the powder charge? I have a Speer manual that lists 66, 68, and 70 gr of 4831 and a Lyman manual that lists 62-69 gr with 69 being their most accurate.
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Old 08-07-2013, 06:19 PM
DPO DPO is offline
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

Ill second Sully as a great way to get going. And have fun with it
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  #5  
Old 08-07-2013, 10:21 PM
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Location: Holland, MI
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

If you have used 180 Partitions in factory ammo, and the accuracy was at least acceptable, then copy the OAL of those factory loads as a starting point. You can always fine tune from there for accuracy.
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  #6  
Old 08-07-2013, 11:04 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2013
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

When developing a load, the more things are consistent, the easier a time you'll have at finding that honey load.

I'd sort out the longest cases, all being either new or once fired and trim them all to the trim to length. You can always use the shorter ones for production, they'll be accurate enough to kill. Trim, chamfer, debur, uniform all the R&D cases, making everything as uniform as you can. Measure every powder charge, trickle to desired weight. I seat the bullet half way, turn the case 180 degrees, and complete the stroke. Just what I was taught way back when.

With less variation in the components as you develop, the better results you'll have. The slight inconsistencies of the production lot won't be noticeable when you hunt, like cases that are a bit shorter, or .10gr of powder difference.

Enjoy! It's man-therapy
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  #7  
Old 08-08-2013, 07:14 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2011
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Re: How "important" are certain details when reloading?

I've got a question, I'm somewhat new to this myself. I was told to weigh my brass. Ok great, but now what? Obviously I can load them separately, but should I be adjusting my charge based on this. Confused. Made no sense to me.
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