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Reloading Techniques For Reloading


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How hard is it to learn to reload ?

 
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  #50  
Old 05-05-2013, 04:04 PM
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Re: How hard is it to learn to reload ?

I thought about making a pilot and cutter and mounting it in a collet in the headstock and useing the turret tailstock and an emergency collet but I'm too lazy.

The Redding I bought, I added a Lufkin head that was in the to be tossed box. I'm like you in that respect.

I like Redding's one size fits all step chuck. I get a kick out of the advertising that calls it a 'lathe'. I sure son't see a cross slide or compound anywhere.
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  #51  
Old 05-05-2013, 06:42 PM
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Re: How hard is it to learn to reload ?

I had mentioned what reloading tools one buys depends on what kind of shooting they do. Trickymissfit talked about powder measures. I don’t use these because I don’t need them and load one round at a time from what my RCBS 1500 electronic scale and dispenser spits out. Slower, but right now, I am fine with that. As I was saying, depends on what your needs are and what you like to do. If I needed to load more rounds, more quickly, well then, the powder measure.

I too use a Forster, for the reasons Trickymissfit cited, and also because I was after accuracy, and the Forster is very, very good for that. And I also am going to move to Forster dies. The Redding stuff I have is overpriced, the seating die is not as good (IMHO), and for the latter, once adjusted for a 223 Remington, it is too long to even fit back into its case! The Forster will. The Forster lock rings are better as well. I can sell my used Redding stuff and make enough to buy brand new Forster products.

The priming provision in the Forster Co-Ax guarantees the same seating depth on all case. .004” if I recall, beneath case head. I use a K&M hand tool now, and it works well too and is faster. Never tried other case trimmers, but completely satisfied with the Wilson one I have. I have a few gauges (Redding case neck thickness gauge, Sinclair concentricity gauge), but like the Neco tool, or something similar. I like the Redding instant indicator but it does not fit the Forster press (according to Redding, and while it MIGHT be able to fit, it would be awkward). And besides, one $85 or so indicator per caliber can be pretty pricey if you shoot multiple calibers.

For case gauges, I am using a Sinclair caliper tool that gives pretty consistent results. You can use Hornandy, but think the case inserts are aluminum (don’t quote me), whereas the Sinclair is steel. I use the Hornandy bullet puller and while a bit awkward on the Forster, it does work and with some practice, can use it quickly.

Loads in reloading manuals can be in serious disagreement, sometimes with the starting load in one manual but very near the max load in another. I take that data, see what others are doing, and make my best estimate while being safe. For my AR-15, I rely heavily on Sierra, since they publish separate data for that kind of rifle vs a bolt action. And I use Sierra bullets for the most part.

I find the inexpensive calipers consistent and fine. However…, I have used a Mitutoyo ($90 or so) and then handled the $25 calipers immediately after. Trading one off vs the other, it difference in quality is immediately apparent. The Mitutoyo has more heft, feels stiffer, and overall feels more durable. My cheap set is already looser in the range I always use it in. However, I never found measurements any different. Comparisons back to back always gave the same measurement result, and the cheap set almost always showed a 0.0000” zero when closed, even after extended use. Still, if you can afford it, get the Mitutoyo.

Fact is, get quality reloading tools. It is supposed to be fun, and that fun is diminished through second rate tools.


Phil
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  #52  
Old 05-05-2013, 09:01 PM
Zep Zep is offline
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Re: How hard is it to learn to reload ?

Great post!
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  #53  
Old 05-06-2013, 10:27 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: greenwood, IN
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Re: How hard is it to learn to reload ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SidecarFlip View Post
I thought about making a pilot and cutter and mounting it in a collet in the headstock and useing the turret tailstock and an emergency collet but I'm too lazy.

The Redding I bought, I added a Lufkin head that was in the to be tossed box. I'm like you in that respect.

I like Redding's one size fits all step chuck. I get a kick out of the advertising that calls it a 'lathe'. I sure son't see a cross slide or compound anywhere.
I found about a hundred of the small Devlieg cutter heads that mount on the end of boring bars once in an obsolite tooling cabnet. Got to thinking about using them and came up with a neck turner using them and Wilson case holders. Was accurate to a tenth (actually I quit using the Wilson case holder and made my own out of 1" Thompson rod and a chamber reamer).

I could write a book on tools and gauges that I just knew were going to be the best there is, and ended up gathering dust on the shelf. But I also learned something from every experiment I tried. (like the stainless steel sine bar I made for grinder work<g>!!!)
gary
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  #54  
Old 05-06-2013, 11:26 AM
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Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 32
Re: How hard is it to learn to reload ?

I expect you and I would have a lot of fun. As a budding, novice amateur machinist, equipped with an old 9" Southbend lathe I rebuilt and a 5 x 20 Rotex horizontal/vertical knee mill (2 motors), and a keen interest in new tools to make the absolute best ammo, I would love to see what is on the dusty shelf. I will in time, need a neck turner, and would like to use the lathe, but am concerned about play in the headstock bearings.

Phil
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  #55  
Old 05-06-2013, 07:08 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: greenwood, IN
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Re: How hard is it to learn to reload ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil3 View Post
I expect you and I would have a lot of fun. As a budding, novice amateur machinist, equipped with an old 9" Southbend lathe I rebuilt and a 5 x 20 Rotex horizontal/vertical knee mill (2 motors), and a keen interest in new tools to make the absolute best ammo, I would love to see what is on the dusty shelf. I will in time, need a neck turner, and would like to use the lathe, but am concerned about play in the headstock bearings.

Phil
Been a long while since I last looked inside a Southbend lathe, but right behind the spindle bearing closest to the chuck there is a large nut to take the bearing up. Don't over do it, and shoot for around .0005" runout with the machine running at it's slowest speed. Let the machine run for about forty minutes to completely warm up the spindle bearing group. Then check it again. Or you can simply pry up on the chuck with a three foot long 2x4 (wood of course). These machines can be fairly accurate if in good shape, and I've seen more than one repeat in the .0003" to .0005" area. Your compound probably needs to be rescraped by now, and that's a task you don't want an amature to even think about trying. If your close to Indy, let me know and we'll fix it. Last knee mills I rebuilt was a pair of K&T universals that were a real dog to rebuild. Not nearly as fun as the old war finish ones I've done several time over in the past.

If you have a parts print of your Southbend, PM me and we'll figure it out. They are not rocket science.
gary
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  #56  
Old 05-06-2013, 07:51 PM
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Re: How hard is it to learn to reload ?

I will PM you. - Phil
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