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High extreme spread

 
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  #8  
Old 09-16-2013, 09:30 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Bend Oregon
Posts: 91
Re: High extreme spread

the accuracy is always very good from 100-300 yards, its when I start shooting beyond 600 and up to 800 yards I see the lower velocity rounds hitting lower, and vice versa, Im using rem brass, havent tried anything else yet, I have bee meticulous with being consistent with my procedure, I will try the bushing die next and maybe some new brass, thanks for all the feedback, any one done any work with hornady bullets ? Scott
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  #9  
Old 09-16-2013, 10:09 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Montana Plains
Posts: 289
Re: High extreme spread

If you chronograph on a day with widely varying light conditions, it will affect the accuracy of chrono results. I learned to chrono ammo of a sunny day with no clouds between chrono and sun. Also, a high summer sun shining on the chrono sensor will affect the reading as well. A cardboard shield taped up high enough to just keep out direct sunlight from entering the sensor cavity will solve this problem.

I have seen chrono readings jump about 100 FPS between direct sunlight on the chrono and then a dark cloud passing over. I use the Shooting Chrony F1 Master, and it will apply to all similar Shooting Chrony chronographs.

Amount of cloud cover is not consistent, but a bright sunny day is consistent. Also, the sun should be 30 degres or more above the horizon to have a consistent light source for the sensors. No chrono readings taken early or late in the day for me.

To test a chrono for consistent readings, use a high quality precharged pneumatic air rifle and shoot weight sorted pellets through it. The air rifle should be fully regulated or self regulated with fill pressure set at best accuracy range. With my BSA Lonestar .25 cal air rifle using JSB pellets, a string of shots will be within about 3 FPS range. High quality PCP air rifles are amazingly consistent in velocity if the pellets are match grade. JSB pellets are usually within about a .1 grain spread. So good that I quit weight sorting them. So buy a can of JSB pellets and have somebody with a fully regulated or self regulated PCP air rifle shoot over your chrono.

Self regulated means the velocity is consistent over a range of shots, maybe as many as 10 in my air rifle, if you keep fill pressure in a narrow range. Hunting rifles tend to be self regulated while target rifles tend to be fully regulated. The fully regulated rifle suffers power loss as the regulation is set at a much lower pressure than fill pressure, but the pressure to the barrel is constant shot to shot until fill pressure drops to regulation pressure. A regulator does not increase pressure, just drops a higher pressure to a set lower pressure. Hunters need full power, so something like a Benjamin Marauder is self regulated. An exception is the Benjamin .357 Rogue. It has an electronically controlled air valve that lets you set energy anywhere you want it, provided you have enough fill pressure, all the way up to 250 FPE, the same as a .38 Special revolver. Definitely a hunting air rifle, designed for animals up to deer size. Find a guy with one of those, and it will be a very consistent shooting rifle that is useful for chrono testing.

Now, after confirming you have a consistent rifle and round, shoot over your chrono on a day of sun and clouds and watch the readings change quite a bit. In this case, it is your chrono and not your load that is inconsistent.
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  #10  
Old 09-16-2013, 10:10 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 2,105
Re: High extreme spread

Yep 123 and 140 amaxs shoot awesome over H4350.
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  #11  
Old 09-16-2013, 10:41 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: greenwood, IN
Posts: 3,574
Re: High extreme spread

Quote:
Originally Posted by D Scott View Post
I have been annealing every 3-4 th firing per the method on accurrateshooter, use the tempil 650 degree paint, spinning in a drill /socket, I have no pressure signs or any split necks some brass 12 x
650* is a little too high for brass annealing. Try bringing it down to 500*, and even 450*. Also get yourself a pair of welder's glasses! How far back you take the heat into the case is also important. I prefer to go back about midway into the shoulder, as by the time the quench happens the heat has moved to the shoulder body junction point. Heat tends to travel in brass and even aluminum very fast.
gary
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  #12  
Old 09-16-2013, 04:37 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Bend Oregon
Posts: 91
Re: High extreme spread

using the magnetospeed I dont have to worry about light conditions, I will do more research on annealing,

at Tickymissfit do you have any data/evidence to support annealing at any given temp ? the reason I ask is b/c I read An in depth article on accurateshooter.com andthey were suggesting 650-700 range
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  #13  
Old 09-16-2013, 08:14 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Bend Oregon
Posts: 91
Re: High extreme spread

I am also using a RCBS hand priming tool, any thoughts on primer seating ?
I appreciate all the feedback thanks Scott
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  #14  
Old 09-16-2013, 08:27 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Bend Oregon
Posts: 91
Re: High extreme spread

also any feedback on who does the best job on a bushing die ? wilson? redding ?
do I need to watch for"donuts" using bushing dies ?
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