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Reloading Techniques For Reloading


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Getting started

 
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  #1  
Old 08-08-2012, 12:51 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 4
Getting started

Looking to get started on reloading.

Anyone recommend a good book and gear to get started?

I have a:
  • Rem 700 7mm mag,
  • Howa 243,
  • Tikka T3 300 Win Mag,
  • Springfield XD 9mm,
  • Marlin 30-30 and looking to buy more.
Goal is to improve accuracy initially for hunting/target loads and generally spend more time shooting.

I'd like to learn more about ballistics and tweak rounds.

Thanks for any help you could provide.
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Old 08-08-2012, 02:37 AM
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Join Date: May 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 733
Re: Getting started

I reckon you should go slow and do a lot of research .
Steer clear of package deals and kits and buy specific equipment based on quality , performance and need .
Redding make very good dies and presses and powder measures so you could start there . RCBS makes a good O frame press as does Lyman
There is many variations on the basic ways to reload so you need to work out what level of loading you need and make the purchases suit that end use.
Don't be sucked in by the expensive gadget crowd as many are just not required for basic loading .
The most basic mistake a new reloader can make is rushing out and buying before you know anything about reloading or what you need . In that situation you are just a prime target for the sales pitch .
You sound like you are on the right track asking about good books first .
Unfortunately I can't advise on books now because all the ones I have are out of print and mainly designed for another country .
The Sierra manual would be a good start .
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  #3  
Old 08-09-2012, 12:43 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 4
Re: Getting started

Bulletbumper, thanks for the feedback. I'll look up those brands.

I'll also look for the Sierra manual.

Also, going to talk to the guy that sold me the 300 win mag. He reloads and showed me the ballistics argument over the 270.

Appreciate your help.
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  #4  
Old 08-09-2012, 07:19 AM
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Posts: 291
Re: Getting started

Just about any of the manuals are good to walk you through the basics. I especially like the Nosler manual because their "accuracy" loads work. The Hodgdon manual is good in that it provides pressure data for their loads. Lee and Lyman are good learning books. I didn't care for the Hornady manual.

"Steer clear of package deals and kits and buy specific equipment based on quality , performance and need ." This is excellent advice.
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  #5  
Old 08-09-2012, 09:45 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: West Central Idaho
Posts: 1,077
Re: Getting started

Quote:
Originally Posted by shortnugly View Post
Looking to get started on reloading.

Anyone recommend a good book and gear to get started?

I have a:
  • Rem 700 7mm mag,
  • Howa 243,
  • Tikka T3 300 Win Mag,
  • Springfield XD 9mm,
  • Marlin 30-30 and looking to buy more.
Goal is to improve accuracy initially for hunting/target loads and generally spend more time shooting.

I'd like to learn more about ballistics and tweak rounds.

Thanks for any help you could provide.
I recommend this book:

Handloading for Competition by Glen D Zediker ISB0-9616925-9-X. It's a very good resources and touches with good detail on just about all aspects of reloading. It's a easy book to read.
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  #6  
Old 08-09-2012, 11:37 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: greenwood, IN
Posts: 3,544
Re: Getting started

*get your hands on a copy of Fred Sinclair's book "Precision Handloading". It will teach you the basics of each phase of the operation.

* see that you shoot a couple belted magnums, so i recommend you buy the die from Inovative Technologies. It's made to size the area just above the belt where regular dies won't do that.

* buy good seating dies! Forster and Redding are the best. You don't need the micrometer head on them unless you plan on switching out bullets on a regular basis (you can add the micrometer headt to the Forster at a later date)

* Most all full length dies are of similar design and quality. I'd just start out with something like a Lee or an RCBS

* don't bother with neck sizing for at least a year!!

* buy good measuring tools from the start. In this area you usually get what you pay for

* Buy a good case trimmer. I spent enough money of trying out the cheap ones to buy three Wilsons with all the case holders

* personally I use nothing but electronic scales, but others around here will swear by their analog scales. An RCBS 10-10 will do more than everything you'll ever want

* buy a good priming tool from the start. Sinclair makes the very best, but a K&M is running right on it's door step. The rest are toys

* Presses are all pretty much the same, but with a couple exceptions. The Lee cast iron press is a good press to learn on, and still last for quite awhile. I use a Forster which a lot of folks think highly of. At least buy a cast iron "O Frame" press. Being as your going to do magnum cases I'd also look for a press with some beef in the frame

* powder measurers are a mixed bag, and I've used quite a few over the years. Hard to beat the cheap Lyman #55 with a Sinclair bottle kit and drop tubes. None of them do long grained stick powders all that well, so keep that thought in mind

avoid reloading kits! In a year's time you replace half the stuff in the kit with better stuff. Keep a couple of log books on your reloading operation. I keep one for each rifle and another for the powder measurer.

gary
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  #7  
Old 08-10-2012, 12:10 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 4
Re: Getting started

Thanks all. Great advice. I'm saving this thread off to a document that I'll refer to when I begin buying equipment.

Another question I have that I may answer myself. With the wide range in calibers and aside from cases, primers and dies, how much equipment can I re-use.
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