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Finding Max OAL for specific bullets

 
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  #8  
Old 10-02-2013, 09:43 AM
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Re: Finding Max OAL for specific bullets

I use the Hornady OAL gauge. It takes longer to get the tool from the drawer than do the actual measuring. Fast and as accurate as anything.
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  #9  
Old 10-02-2013, 12:52 PM
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Re: Finding Max OAL for specific bullets

I understand that the ogive is what matters, weather I measure from the ogive or the tip I still maintain the same result per bullet( with tips intact and consistent ) I just feel more confident measuring from the tip. Where are you guys starting your loads at? My accuracy hunting load is already determined but I bought some 208's and 125's to play with, nosler measures 2.999 to lands and is accuracy tested @ 2.775. Should I use this same distance? .224 from contact?

And after measuring a few times it was within .010 even pushing on the bullet a bit. It really doesn't take long after you measure the first one
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  #10  
Old 10-02-2013, 01:19 PM
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Re: Finding Max OAL for specific bullets

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skubasteve View Post
I understand that the ogive is what matters, weather I measure from the ogive or the tip I still maintain the same result per bullet( with tips intact and consistent ) I just feel more confident measuring from the tip. Where are you guys starting your loads at? My accuracy hunting load is already determined but I bought some 208's and 125's to play with, nosler measures 2.999 to lands and is accuracy tested @ 2.775. Should I use this same distance? .224 from contact?

And after measuring a few times it was within .010 even pushing on the bullet a bit. It really doesn't take long after you measure the first one
That is the issue though, the tips and overall lengths aren't consistent. So if you measure from the tip your bearing surface will be off and accuracy will suffer. Only you can determine if the result you get doing it less accurately is sufficient.

Scot E.
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  #11  
Old 10-02-2013, 04:06 PM
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Re: Finding Max OAL for specific bullets

every time I open a new box or bag of bullets I use a fl sized case with no primer or powder lube inside the neck place a bullet from the new pack in the neck and chamber it. It has seated the dummy to the lands measure this and write it down ,now place the dummy on your press and with the seater die (with the seating depth plunger all the way up) raise the dummy up in the die and screw down the plunger to the bullet, now screw it down just a little and remeasure. I like .010" shorter.
When I have loaded all 99 from the pack I pull the dummy and load it also.
For each pack I do this unless the new pack has the same sku number as the old pack.
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  #12  
Old 10-02-2013, 05:28 PM
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Re: Finding Max OAL for specific bullets

The cleaning rod method is sound. Better is the R-P tool, which further refines the cleaning rod method.

Measuring to the tip is not a problem, because it's representative of THAT bullet, for COAL of your master. After measure you load the master to matching COAL with THAT bullet, and then measure it's OgvOAL with a comparator that you always use.
Log this value.
With this, you can reproduce seating w/resp to the logged value.

This number doesn't represent a truth, but your load development results do.
And all that matters is that you can reproduce THAT truth.
When you change bullet types, do it all again.. Find the new truth

You know, the only reason to measure Max OgvOAL is to know in load development when you're contacting lands & causing a step change in pressure. Other than that, it's really of no value.
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  #13  
Old 10-02-2013, 06:51 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2013
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Re: Finding Max OAL for specific bullets

I've tried most of the methods listed above and this was the only consistent "foolproof" way I found for myself. I understand that each bullet tip may vary, that's why I took out 5 bullets out to check my measurements were accurate, and to get the ogive all you would have to do is measure the ogive and input it in the little equation. What are you guys starting your new loads at? Does the seating need to change with different bullet weights?
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  #14  
Old 10-02-2013, 10:47 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
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Re: Finding Max OAL for specific bullets

Measuring to the tip is the least accurate way to load precision rounds. But if you take that one bullet that you used to measure your oal to set up your seating die(assuming your seater is the competition ogive type) then you'll be fine. But you have to understand that, discounting any account for throat erosion, your oal to the lands of your rifling will be the same for any bullet, be it a long nose vld bullet or a soft point hunting bullet. This is why precision reloaders choose to measure to the ogive, which is the part of the bullet that contacts the lands of your rifling.
To answer your question. Seating depth is important and different for each type of bullet. Some like to be jammed into the lands and some like a little jump. It is important to measure ogive length of a loaded round to ensure the jump distance is consistent. This is good for the bullet but also ensures that the pressure spike occurs at the same point as the powder burns. If you were measuring oal from the tip of the bullet then the jump would be inconsistent, meaning the pressure spike would be inconsistent, causing velocity to be inconsistent, causing accuracy to suffer.
Consistency of pressure is key. It is the reason that neck tension consistency is so important also, along with case capacity, charge weight, etc.
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