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Decreasing bullet runout during bullet seating

 
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  #1  
Old 02-07-2014, 03:08 PM
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Decreasing bullet runout during bullet seating

I recently acquired the Sinclair concentricity gauge and am now determining what steps of my reloading process are contributing to bullet runout. Iím currently reloading for my .204 (Hornady brass and 39 gr SBK pills). Once fired brass give less than 1 thou runout. Brass resized using a Lee collet die also give less than or equal to 1 thou runout. When seating bullets using the Lee ďdead length bullet seaterĒ (the one that comes with the collet dies); Iím seeing anywhere from 1.5-5 thousands of runout in the loaded ammo with most averaging around 3 thou. Measurement is taken on the ogive close to the ballistic tip.
I have noticed brass with a more aggressive case mouth chamfer helps with runout so I have went back and re-chamfered the brass with a VLD style chamfer Ė even with this, Iím still seeing high and inconsistent runout. Iím not sure what bothers me more, the high runout values or the extreme spread (one round will be 2 thou runout and the next will be 5 thou).
Also noteworthy; Iím not using the lock nut w/ O-ring provided with the lee seating die. Iíve replaced it with a Hornady-style collar.
Suggestions appreciated; thanks.
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  #2  
Old 02-07-2014, 03:21 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2012
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Re: Decreasing bullet runout during bullet seating

There is only so much perfection you can achieve without moving into advance reloading. In order to get more consistent cases, you will have to do complete benchrest cases, meaning you will have to start turning necks. In addition, you will have to sort all of your bullets, and if you want more consistency, weight them as well. You need to decide why you want such level of perfection. If you have a hunting rig, you probably dont need to get into such hassle. Its up to you.
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Old 02-07-2014, 03:44 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: central Georgia
Posts: 310
Re: Decreasing bullet runout during bullet seating

The best method that I have found to get low runout is as follows: 1. size brass 2. neck turn 3. load and shoot in a good chamber 4.resize and reload with quality dies such as Forster or Whidden. 5. when seating the bullet, rotate the cartridge in the shellholder at least three times and seat in each position. Using this process , I rarely have loaded cartridges that exceed .001 runout. Cartridges that I normally load are .22-.250, .243, 7STW, .308, .300 RUM, and .338EDGE. Gary
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  #4  
Old 02-07-2014, 05:00 PM
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Re: Decreasing bullet runout during bullet seating

A Forster benchrest seat die will go a long way to minimize your runout. You don't need the micromerter adjust the Ultra comes with. The sliding-sleeve, tight-tolerance axial alignment of bullet to case design is superb. Your lee die will work well on blunt or flat nose bullets but not so good for points.
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  #5  
Old 02-07-2014, 05:22 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Green River, Wyoming
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Re: Decreasing bullet runout during bullet seating

I just got a Hornady Concentricity tool for Christmas and have actually been impressed with the readings I get on my reloads straight out of the seating die. I use plain ol' RCBS and Redding dies and usually see .001"-.003" runout in a box of 50, with only a handful being .003" out. Not exaggerating, seriously...

From pictures it doesn't look like the Sinclair concentricity tool lets you tweak the runout after measuring. The Hornady one is handy in that once you get a reading you can then crank the thumb-screw which presses laterally on the bullet until you have a satisfactory amount of runout. Getting to less than .001" runout with this method is usually pretty easy.
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  #6  
Old 02-07-2014, 08:13 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: alabama
Posts: 209
Re: Decreasing bullet runout during bullet seating

Here is what i do with all the custom guns i have built. Fisrt i buy a Harrells Precision blank, then i have my gunsmith use the same reamer he used on my rifle barrell to make my seating die. Then when i fire the rounds i send John Whidden 2 peices of fired brass and in 3 or so i have my fl or neck dies sent to me. I think the last set of bushing dies where around 200 dollars or so. Whiddens will make you what ever you want. You can just send John a print of your reamer or if its real popular he may allready have it on file .
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  #7  
Old 02-07-2014, 08:34 PM
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Location: NC, oceanfront
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Re: Decreasing bullet runout during bullet seating

Quote:
Originally Posted by CB11WYO View Post
I just got a Hornady Concentricity tool for Christmas and have actually been impressed with the readings I get on my reloads straight out of the seating die. I use plain ol' RCBS and Redding dies and usually see .001"-.003" runout in a box of 50, with only a handful being .003" out. Not exaggerating, seriously...

From pictures it doesn't look like the Sinclair concentricity tool lets you tweak the runout after measuring. The Hornady one is handy in that once you get a reading you can then crank the thumb-screw which presses laterally on the bullet until you have a satisfactory amount of runout. Getting to less than .001" runout with this method is usually pretty easy.
You're seeing less runout because the Hornady is greatly inferior to the Sinclair V-block for measuring runout, and neck bending does not actually reduce runout.

BPUU, that your fired runout as measured on necks did not increase with collet neck sizing means whatever thickness variance you have in the brass is still internal. It wasn't driven outward. Then you seat bullets into this internal runout, and see the result of it while measuring off bullet noses.
You need to expand necks to drive thickness variance outward. With this, seated necks will measure higher runout, but lower off bullets(because they will be seated straighter).
I recommend Sinclair's expander die system for this.
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