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Crimping Nosler .223 bullets

 
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  #8  
Old 12-15-2013, 01:41 PM
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Re: Crimping Nosler .223 bullets

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Originally Posted by varmintH8R View Post
I'm not sure if what you read in the Nosler manual is a matter of semantics or if it is an error, but regardless it shouldn't effect what you do...
I agree 100%. I'm pretty sure I know what I'm going to do, I just want to fully understand what I'm doing and why before I do it.
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Old 12-15-2013, 01:56 PM
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Re: Crimping Nosler .223 bullets

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Originally Posted by SidecarFlip View Post
No. I don't use Lee dies for bottleneck cartridges but yours will work fine. I use a Lee specific caliber crimp die that just crimps and nothing else. I use RCBS or Redding or Wilson die sets.
What's the difference between the "factory crimp die" and the "specific caliber crimp die"? From my understanding, I can use the seating die to also roll crimp at the same time OR I can do the crimping operation in a separate step with the factory crimp die which only crimps. Sorry if I sound like a dummy here, I'm just trying to learn.

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The crimp operation (depth/severity of crimp) is entirely dependent on you and how you set the press/die for crimp so it will behoove you 'practice' getting the desired crimp depth/severity.
This raises a big question. How do I know how much crimp I want? My feeling is that the amount of crimp isn't as critical as the consistency of the crimp from round to round.
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Old 12-15-2013, 01:58 PM
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Re: Crimping Nosler .223 bullets

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Originally Posted by REDHEAD View Post
Crimping seems puzzling to me. Had alot of bad experience with crimping .40 SW, blewup 3 pistols.
Out of curiosity, were they Glocks and if so, what generation? Also, what bullet and load were you shooting?
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  #11  
Old 12-15-2013, 02:08 PM
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Re: Crimping Nosler .223 bullets

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Originally Posted by trophyhusband View Post
I was under the impression that a "taper crimp" and a "factory crimp" are a little different. Is that the case or are they the same thing?
Best I can tell, they are the same concept (at least relative to a roll crimp). They are tapered to press the very to of the case neck tighter into the bullet, without turning the neck ends inward.

Factory Crimp Die - Lee Precision
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  #12  
Old 12-15-2013, 04:20 PM
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Re: Crimping Nosler .223 bullets

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Originally Posted by REDHEAD View Post
Crimping seems puzzling to me. Had alot of bad experience with crimping .40 SW, blewup 3 pistols. Know I don,'t crimp at all. I mite suggest you color or smoke a reload and start with just a kiss. If your denting or crushing the bullet - is too much. My $ .02 worth. Go slow , good luck.
You obviously did something wrong because you must bellmouth a straight wall case to insert the pill and then crimp the pill in the case.

Overcrimping a straightwall case can cause case failure because it compromises the case wall from too much flex.
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  #13  
Old 12-15-2013, 06:32 PM
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Re: Crimping Nosler .223 bullets

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Originally Posted by trophyhusband View Post
I'm reloading .223 for the first time and came across something confusing. I'm loading Nosler 60 gr ballistic tip bullets. The Nosler Reloading Guide says on page 109 "If you are loading for semi-auto and find that crimping the bullet is necessary, we recommend using a taper crimp since there is no crimping groove on any of our .22 caliber products." (Emphasis mine.) The thing is, the Nosler bullets I have DO have a cannelure. Is this a mis-statement in their manual (printed Feb 2013), or am I missing something?
Did you by chance buy overruns or blems?? If so they are often destined for a factory but they make a bit more than they need.... The extra after culling unusable bullets is sold off at a discount. I suspect that is how you got cannelured nosler bt's. I have gotten some cannelured 338 cal ab's as blems.

The cannelure really makes no difference as to bullet performence if you don't need it. Just leave it be. If you need a mild crimp on a 22 for an auto, either use a cannelured bullet and crimp into it (roll crimp) or use either a taper crimp or lee factory crimp die to put a bit of crimp on it. Make sure your brass is exactly the same length if you crimp, as varying length will affect bullet pull a lot more than uncrimped ammo. Also, if you roll crimp you can run into case damage and feeding issues on any brass that is longer than the brass you use to set the crimp.
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  #14  
Old 12-15-2013, 06:49 PM
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Re: Crimping Nosler .223 bullets

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Originally Posted by REDHEAD View Post
Crimping seems puzzling to me. Had alot of bad experience with crimping .40 SW, blewup 3 pistols. Know I don,'t crimp at all. I mite suggest you color or smoke a reload and start with just a kiss. If your denting or crushing the bullet - is too much. My $ .02 worth. Go slow , good luck.
How the heck do you wait until the third pistol to change your reloading tactics?? I'd have crapped myself on the first one and asked for help straightening things out with a more experienced reloader. Of course you need to taper crimp for an auto loading pistol, otherwise you will have feeding issues.

Take your time and work up your loads. They say to do it for a reason. There is another issue with high pressure low capacity cases I don't doubt you encountered; you need to stay close to recommended oals. in data (especially in the 9 luger and 40 smith) as loading short will drastically up pressure because your initial case volume is lower. Loading long will cause feeding hangups in many pistols. Loading to short coupled with over-crimping you could easily be running close to twice intended pressures. Add to that the 40 smith having a partially unsupported chamber, and you've got a genuinely dangerous situation.
It addition primer changes in pistols can be rather dramatic to pressure changes; as an example the winchester small pistol mag. primer is much hotter than most other small pistol primers. A haphazard substitution of that primer can cause high pressures on its own. I've been there; popped a cyllinder full of primers on a 357; won't go there again, even with a mild load before the switch it was trouble. I would use the primer type specifiad in the loading data for most pistol loads unless I was sure that the substitute is very close to the other primer. In large pistol the differences are far less dramatic that small, but prudence is still best.
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