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Bullet seating depth?

 
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  #8  
Old 01-21-2013, 09:21 PM
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Re: Bullet seating depth?

I shoot a tika t3 lite stainless in a 22-250, I seat my 50 grain sierra blitz kings to an o.a.l of 2.460 just off of the rifeling, the manual suggests that it should be at 2.350, should I be concerned that it is way off from what the manual states?
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  #9  
Old 01-21-2013, 11:27 PM
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Re: Bullet seating depth?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whitetailaddict View Post
I shoot a tika t3 lite stainless in a 22-250, I seat my 50 grain sierra blitz kings to an o.a.l of 2.460 just off of the rifeling, the manual suggests that it should be at 2.350, should I be concerned that it is way off from what the manual states?
Does your rifle function normally with this load? Does the accuracy of this load meet your requirements? Is your velocity at a normal level for this load?

If you answered yes then your most likely fine. I couldn't tell you what the COAL is for any of my loads.

I load off of the lands, and as long as the bullet is seated into the neck to be held securely I don't much care what ever COAL might be.
__________________
Keep in mind the animals we shoot for food and display are not bullet proof. Contrary to popular belief, they bleed and die just like they did a hundred years ago. Being competent with a given rifle is far more important than impressive ballistics and poor shootability. High velocity misses never put a steak in the freezer.

Joe
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  #10  
Old 01-22-2013, 05:14 AM
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Location: PA
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Re: Bullet seating depth?

The manuals suggested OAL's are to keep it short enuf to feed thru most magazines.

To determline where the bullet ogive touches the lands, get a Hornady bullet comparator and read the instructions. The lighter bullets may need to be seated down so that they are not able to reach the lands. Try to keep minimum of about .01" of bullet in the neck.
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  #11  
Old 01-22-2013, 07:43 AM
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Re: Bullet seating depth?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene View Post
Try to keep minimum of about .01" of bullet in the neck.
.01"? Is that a misprint? The .172 that I have with the 90 grain Sierra's doesn't seem like enough...
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  #12  
Old 01-22-2013, 08:09 AM
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Location: PA
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Re: Bullet seating depth?

That would be about the minimum. Most important, the bullet has to be concentric with bore. Move lit down until it is.

Last edited by Gene; 01-22-2013 at 08:10 AM. Reason: spell
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  #13  
Old 01-22-2013, 10:08 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2012
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Re: Bullet seating depth?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe King View Post
Does your rifle function normally with this load? Does the accuracy of this load meet your requirements? Is your velocity at a normal level for this load?

If you answered yes then your most likely fine. I couldn't tell you what the COAL is for any of my loads.

I load off of the lands, and as long as the bullet is seated into the neck to be held securely I don't much care what ever COAL might be.


the rifle functions fine, and I can shoot five shots inside a hole the size of a Quarter, but I do not know what my velocity is other then what it says in the reloading manual. I use a remington case and in the reloading manual it states a federal case is what they used in there test, so there could be a difference in case pressure, is this something to be concerned with when reloading a case? I guess I have to invest in a chronagraph to find out what my velocity is going to be.
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  #14  
Old 01-22-2013, 11:57 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: The cold part of Montana
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Re: Bullet seating depth?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whitetailaddict View Post
the rifle functions fine, and I can shoot five shots inside a hole the size of a Quarter, but I do not know what my velocity is other then what it says in the reloading manual. I use a remington case and in the reloading manual it states a federal case is what they used in there test, so there could be a difference in case pressure, is this something to be concerned with when reloading a case? I guess I have to invest in a chronagraph to find out what my velocity is going to be.
The farther out of the neck your bullet is seated the lower your pressure will be, until it touches the lands then you'll see a sharp increase, maybe not a large increase though. If you know your bullets true BC all you need to do is shoot it down range at different ranges, say 100yrds zero 300yrs, 500, 600, yrds. And measure the drop to the center of each group write it down, get on a balistics program such as JBM, try different velocities until you find a velocity that match your recorded drops. Then take the money you would have spent on a chrony buy more reloading supplies and shoot more Those down range groups say 300 and beyond, the farther the better will tell you more than a chrony can
__________________
Keep in mind the animals we shoot for food and display are not bullet proof. Contrary to popular belief, they bleed and die just like they did a hundred years ago. Being competent with a given rifle is far more important than impressive ballistics and poor shootability. High velocity misses never put a steak in the freezer.

Joe
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