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Brass Conundrum

 
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  #1  
Old 12-04-2012, 07:56 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Iron Range, Minnesota
Posts: 783
Brass Conundrum

Hi All,

Got what is probably a stupid rookie problem. Back story is that I started reloading to save some money, but somewhere along the line, it became more true handloading, trying to make the best loads I can. This has caused me a problem. I started out using Hornady brass that I had saved, and I like the performance I am getting. I have about 3 loads through the brass, and only have about 80 pieces. Combine that with having loosening primer pockets on some because of some overloads caused by inexperience, and I'll run out after not really all that long.

Here's my problem, I have several hundred other brass, just 100 each from Nosler and SSA, and a mixed bag of over 100 Remington, Magtech, and some Argentinian stuff.

Part of me wants to gut it out and use what I have, but a growing part of me is saying to stick with the brass I know and get rid of the other stuff, admitting that really, the consistency is more important than the cost savings

I'm trying to decide, do I sell off the other brass and start buying up new Hornady brass? Or do i risk switching brass as I run out, and have to redo things? leaning toward finding a good way to get rid of the other brass and start buying the Hornady, but looking for others' input.

Thanks

Erik
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  #2  
Old 12-04-2012, 08:31 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Murray, Ky.
Posts: 1,281
Re: Brass Conundrum

Me personally, ive always chose a maker of said brass and stuck with it. Ive seen changing brass make a difference before but ive also seen a batch lot change in same brand of brass make a difference as well. If it were me id buy more of whatever brass gave you the best results.

But that is just me take it for what its worth. Brass manufacturer is the very tip of the iceburg when you start really looking for accuracy tho. There are a ton more things i look for in my brass, sometimes ill spend 3 or more hours on 20 cases in sorting and prep time.


Nathan
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  #3  
Old 12-04-2012, 10:45 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 27
Re: Brass Conundrum

If accuracy is your main goal then it is important to use your best brass. All casings in a given lot need to be the same head stamp. New brass is the best way to start out. This brass was all produced at the same time under the same conditions. A new bag of brass should always stay together as a lot and not mixed with other or or older brass. Understand this is the only component you reuse therefore it is very important the brass is properly prepared. On your data card write down the times reloaded. As you get more advanced in your reloading skills you will want to weight match your brass, turn your necks for matching neck tension and correct excessive neck run-out and much more. Realize discarding old brass that has seen its last days is part of the life cycle of brass. Depending on how much you shoot you should have plenty of new brass to cycle in so your always rotating your lots of brass. Don't forget, as a reloader your reloaded ammo needs to be 100% safe. If you pick up discarded brass know what and how to look for signs of failing brass before they fail. Last, take all your dicarded brass to a recycler. They will give you money. Take that money and buy new brass. Hope this helps.
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  #4  
Old 12-04-2012, 10:51 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 27
Re: Brass Conundrum

If accuracy is your main goal then it is important to use your best brass. All casings in a given lot need to be the same head stamp. New brass is the best way to start out. This brass was all produced at the same time under the same conditions. A new bag of brass should always stay together as a lot and not mixed with other or or older brass. Understand this is the only component you reuse therefore it is very important the brass is properly prepared. On your data card write down the times reloaded. As you get more advanced in your reloading skills you will want to weight match your brass, turn your necks for matching neck tension and correct excessive neck run-out and much more. Realize discarding old brass that has seen its last days is part of the life cycle of brass. Depending on how much you shoot you should have plenty of new brass to cycle in so your always rotating your lots of brass. Don't forget, as a reloader your reloaded ammo needs to be 100% safe. If you pick up discarded brass know what and how to look for signs of failing brass before they fail. Last, take all your dicarded brass to a recycler. They will give you money. Take that money and buy new brass. Hope this helps.
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  #5  
Old 12-04-2012, 11:03 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 27
Re: Brass Conundrum

If accuracy is your main goal then it is important to use your best brass. All casings in a given lot need to be the same head stamp. New brass is the best way to start out. This brass was all produced at the same time under the same conditions. A new bag of brass should always stay together as a lot and not mixed with other or or older brass. Understand this is the only component you reuse therefore it is very important the brass is properly prepared. On your data card write down the times reloaded. As you get more advanced in your reloading skills you will want to weight match your brass, turn your necks for matching neck tension and correct excessive neck run-out and much more. Realize discarding old brass that has seen its last days is part of the life cycle of brass. Depending on how much you shoot you should have plenty of new brass to cycle in so your always rotating your lots of brass. Don't forget, as a reloader your reloaded ammo needs to be 100% safe. If you pick up discarded brass know what and how to look for signs of failing brass before they fail. Last, take all your dicarded brass to a recycler. They will give you money. Take that money and buy new brass. Hope this helps.
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