Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Rifles, Reloading, Optics, Equipment > Reloading

Reloading Techniques For Reloading


Reply

Anealing question

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-26-2013, 11:53 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 288
Anealing question

First time I tried anealing. I think the two on the right are good to go, and the two on the left got a bit to much heat. There is a little dark blotchiness. But a little 600 grit and it comes right off. If I over heated them the discoloration shouldn't come off right?
Attached Thumbnails - Click to View Larger
Anealing question-image.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-27-2013, 09:48 AM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: MN
Posts: 84
Re: Anealing question

Yes, the two on the right look like they are annealed correctly. But are they? You've most likely read that the key to accurate hand-loads is that everything MUST be consistent. An annealing machine is an efficient and consistent way to anneal brass if you can afford one.

However, I simply put 650 degree Tempilaq on the outside of the case just below the shoulder and use a horizontal strip about the width of the tine on a dinner fork and about 1/8 of an inch long. This method allows me to see exactly when the brass reaches the target temperature.


For more information on this process go to the following link:

The art and Science of Annealing
The Art and Science of Annealing
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-27-2013, 09:54 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Townsend, Montana.
Posts: 7,940
Re: Anealing question

yes the two on the left look to have been too hot. But like said before this process needs to be done in a controlled method. I would worry if those two were too hot if they will even work back into the same hardness for consistent neck tension as the rest.

I love my bench source annealer. I doubt I would anneal at all if I could not so it consistently. Consistency is what we all strive to achieve.

Jeff
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-27-2013, 01:09 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 288
Re: Anealing question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Broz View Post
yes the two on the left look to have been too hot. But like said before this process needs to be done in a controlled method. I would worry if those two were too hot if they will even work back into the same hardness for consistent neck tension as the rest.

I love my bench source annealer. I doubt I would anneal at all if I could not so it consistently. Consistency is what we all strive to achieve.

Jeff
After reading the article from the above reply it makes a lot more since. My original goal was to extend brass life. Never considered the accuracy benefit.

Have another question if you guys don't mind. My method for anealing was the extended socket and the drill. Put the brass in and spin the drill. Use the torch until you see it just start to turn blue. Got the method from the guy at ammosmith.com. I don't shoot competitively, hunting and long range practice, and I was wondering if this method is a waist of time.

I'm not trying to be lazy or cut corners, just new to anealing and need feedback on my current method.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-27-2013, 01:13 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Townsend, Montana.
Posts: 7,940
Re: Anealing question

I know a lot of guys do it that way. I just cant get comfortable with the possibilities of the variables. That's why I bought a machine that does each case exactly the same and has an adjustable timer for how long it is in the flame spinning.

Jeff
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-27-2013, 01:22 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 288
Re: Anealing question

I guess some range time will tell how well it might work.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-27-2013, 10:15 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 65
Re: Anealing question

To me, all four cases looked over annealed, according to my bench source information
when its done right you notice very little discoloration on the case.
When I set up to anneal the room is dark and I use 650 to 700 templac to check for proper temps and time the case sits on the rotating platform.

I have also noticed that when I have annealed virgin brass for the first time I get a slighter darker coloration then I do after I anneal a fired case.

I annealed new cases to see if I could increase the life of reloads when I would shoot them on the hot side. And I did get two more firings out of them
.
I know that the necks give me lighter tension when I seat the bullets they glide right in. So I am, readjusting the grain structure on the neck. Most of the time I think most guys over anneal looking for that rainbow or purple discoloration below the shoulder of the case.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC