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Would floating this barrel help me? (A newb's first post)

 
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  #8  
Old 03-11-2008, 11:53 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Starkville, MS
Posts: 40
First of all, you guys have been very helpful and I thank each of you. And I just wanna say first off that I completely understand all of your points about trying for deer at 1000yds. I was more curious than anything, and really only planned on slaying milk jugs that far out ;) LOL, and yes tjon, my wife is very supportive of my hobby.

I do have 2 followup questions for you guys:

1) Can you expand on the concept of "finding a cartridge that your rifle likes"? Or point me to a place where I can learn about the right way to do this. Do I use only the bullets I wanna hunt with, or do I use different brands, weights, styles (i.e. match loads), ect? I do not reload at this point, so I'd be limited to commercial ammo (but reloading is something I'd like to get into at some point).

2) Can you guys give me a little bit more info on this stock replacement suggestion? Not that I am arguing with you - only trying to understand gun mechanics better - what is wrong with the factory stock on my rifle? Would an replacement HS Precision stock really be that noticeable of an upgrade - is it money well spent? What is the difference between the Sporter and Varmint models of the HS Precision stocks? I can't tell on their website. What is aluminum bedding (do you still pour glass on top of that)? Since the gun has had no custom work done to it out-of-box, I could just order the one for a Mod 70 and it would fit, right? Also, another newb question, but if I have a .30-06 Sprg, then my rifle is long action, right?
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  #9  
Old 03-11-2008, 01:20 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,856
Seeing that you don't reload , whats ment by finding a round that your gun likes is this , all loads produce barrel vibration andn this varries from load to load , maker to maker in some guns as little a 1/2 a grain will make a big differance in this vibration , this is directly linked to accuracy Handloaders adjust their load "tune" so that their gun finds an area that it shoot accurately at. Since you don't reload yet you will have to try several differant factroy offerings to find one that your gun likes the best , some guns will like hotter loads where some will like lighter loads , even guns with consecutive serial numbers will shoot two differant types of ammo differantly. As to the kind to shoot , well if you shooting long range targets its better to shoot a quality match bullet like those found in the Federal Gold Metal Match and so on. The Hornady ammo offered in both lightmagnum and custom is good stuff as is the Black Hills , you gonna want to shoot a bullet with a bit higher BC , the 30-06 will run a 168gr bullet out fast enough from a 1-10 twsit barrel to shoot to 1000yds , the heavier 175-180 bullet will shot a little bit better at the realy long range. You can get into reloading with a pretty good kit from several differant places , all the major makers have them.

As for the stock , well the thing about the factory stock is that its cheaply made and very flemsey , not that a cheap stock can't be made to shoot but its alot cheaper (if your paying for it) to bed and float the current stick. The better stocks like HS are made from laid up fiberglass around a stiff glass filled foam with a rigid aluminum core so its very stiff and stabill. As for being money well spent , well it certainly is is you plan to build on this gun later , if you plan to sell it then no you will be taking a loss on it.
the differance between the sporter and varmint stock is generaly that the Varmint stocks have a wider forend and a larger barrel channel to accept a thicker barrel. The wider forend is more stabill when shot from the bags and also aids in stiffening the stock.
The aluminum bedding block aids in making the stock to action fit much more stabill and a much stronger bedding area , and yes its generaly a good idea to glass bed these stock also to make the stock to action fit skin tight.

Your gun is a long action and most likely a new controle round feed , this gun can be built into just about anything you want
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  #10  
Old 03-11-2008, 03:48 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: bismarck ND
Posts: 406
everything that james said is spot on...
if i were you i would change the stock because of the gun that you hve. do these little upgrades you will see the differance after you are done. the reason that i would do this is because yo can always change the caliber later. the thing that most new shooters need is true long range practise. go shoot the crap out of it and when your ready to change to a different more flat shooting caliber you will only need to change the barrel and have the action trued. you have a great start to a rifle you just need to fine tune it... small changes arent expencive its when you have to do it all at once...
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  #11  
Old 03-18-2008, 10:37 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Star, ID
Posts: 257
Advice from a Novice, who was a rookie about a year ago. There is a lot to cover, I started to make a huge response but decided to cut it down.

First, if you don't have at least $500 to dump in this you aren't giving yourself much of a chance. If you have $2000 or more then you are in good shape.

Start by getting a basic ballistics software program and get an idea of how different loads perform over distance, driven at various velocities. For deer I'd recommed a rule of a min of 1000 ft lbs of energy to find your max distance for a given load. I use PointBlank.

The items mentioned (trigger, action, barrel) is where to start and hopefully can cost $200 or less. Then spend the $$ to buy a starter reloading kit $250, and some basic supplies(powder, bullets, primers). You can do a lot to improve accuracy with load development and at the same time after your initial investment in components your cost per round will be about 1/3 of retail for premium rounds. If you like doing this you will want to shoot a lot, so over the long run the cost of bullets will be less. Now, many people would read this a rush to post that you will get addicted and spend a lot of money buying newer and better stuff, they are right.

I would get a good manual on reloading and read about the basics. Others can probably recommend better, I'd say if you have a favorite class of bullets, i/e Nosler or Sierra, then buy their's as they all have basic reloading included. Once you have that down then I'd recommend buying "Precision Shooting, Reloading Guide" and read the first and last chapters. This will focus you on a few key ways to really improve accuracy (i/e bullet seating and how it lines up your bullet into the barrel). At that point you should have your gun done and you can then fireform some brass, then start developing a load.

You will need to make your gun shoot at or under 1" groups at 100 yards before you can start poking out very far if you hope to hit a deer in the vitals or even milk jugs.

I have managed to get 4 guns all shooting about 1.5 MOA out of the box, with just trigger jobs, down to MOA with just basic load development. Actually one is actually shooting .5 moa, and it's a thin barreled Remington Mtn Rifle. With the more advanced idea's in the Precision Shooting I think I can get the rest down even farther.

Have fun, I am!!
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  #12  
Old 03-20-2008, 10:40 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Starkville, MS
Posts: 40
where can i get that guide? Is it a book or an e-book for download?
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  #13  
Old 03-21-2008, 05:22 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 12
Another suggestion from a new guy, watch Ebay for a stock. I picked up a laminated one last year for my Super shadow for $90 delivered. It was a factory take off and needed a little dremel work to fit, but after bedding etc I am pleased, not bad for under a $100. Accuracy did improve quite a bit. Just my $.02
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  #14  
Old 03-21-2008, 07:45 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Star, ID
Posts: 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by GABR13L View Post
where can i get that guide? Is it a book or an e-book for download?
It is a book. I purchased mine at Sportsmans Warehouse. A Google search showed it available at Amazon and Midway, both $22.95 new and both had max star user ratings.
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