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# some rifle stocks better than others #

 
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  #8  
Old 12-31-2013, 01:57 PM
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Re: # some rifle stocks better than others #

I have stocked many large caliber rifles in laminated wood stocks without issues. Although my first choice would be a laminated hardwood blank, the laminated birch blanks offered by a few suppliers will work as well.
The "industry standard" laminated panels come from suppliers like Rutland or Cousineau. They use a birch veneer, saturate it with epoxy and compress it under hight pressure to make the blank.
Over the years, I have had issues with panels de-laminating and "not so good birch" veneer being used. The birch is a fair material at best, but by introducing the expoy, we now have a useable somewhat stable blank to work with.
When using these birch laminated blanks for heavy hitters, I prefer to make the stock in a single shot configuration. When you cut a large hole in the bottom of the stock, you essentially compromise the integrity of the stock. When the energy from the recoil is transferred from the back of the lug to the bedding, the sidess of the stock will "bow" under this compression. It is a minimal amount, but nonetheless it will happen. Same effect will happen with a composite stock as well.
As for the bedding... I mill the recoil lug mortise to encompass a sufficient amount of bedding. A proper bedding of the barreled action into the laminate stock will give you worry free service over the life of the barrel...
In summary, a properly made and bedded laminated stock will suffice for a large caliber rifle.
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Old 12-31-2013, 02:54 PM
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Re: # some rifle stocks better than others #

Quote:
Originally Posted by No Fear in Accuracy View Post
I wondered myself why do shooters/hunters prefer this type of stock instead of similar stock.

Mind you, I have a McMillan A-5 Adj. cheek piece stock, using 6BR cartridge.

I've researched and gather all information I need to build for my next project. My long range project will be either 338 AM/338 Snipetac or 338 Raptor.

It seems that most popular are McMillan A-5 or Manners. That will handle high powered cartridge due to twist, shifting and better design.

When I shoot at long range, I only touch with my thumb on the grip, one finger on the trigger, cheek weld lightly on the cheek piece and shoulder lightly touches the butt.

So why did you choose this stock over other stock? Based on looks, feel and weight?
I wonder if I can use the laminated wood stock for high powered rifle. (see the picture below, red stripes on black). The price is around $200.

McMillan A-5 is approaching $700 to $900.

Like most people I like what I like.

From a strength stand point I would put a good laminate up against any other type and cost of stocks

Most of the precision rifles (Bench Rest are on Laminate stocks) They are very strong and very stable. Not believing hardly anything I hear, I decided to test the difference in stability.

I placed 4 different types of stocks on a concrete slab with a 20lb bag of shot on the butt stock and a dial indicator the same distance from the end of the but stock on the fore arm. I even shaded the dial indicators to prevent heat from effecting them.

After 30 minuets in the sun I found the most effected by heating on one side was the Tupperware (No big surprises) next was the all wood factory stock. (Different woods would probably have an effect on the warping amount.

Next was a High dollar composite. And the laminate had the least deflection of all of them.

I realize this was not a very scientific test but it did tell me what stock material was less effected
by uneven heat and was the most stable.

As far as strength, I have laminates on most of my Big bore rifles and have never had a failure.

All this aside , I like Laminates.

J E CUSTOM
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Old 12-31-2013, 10:03 PM
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Re: # some rifle stocks better than others #

Quote:
Originally Posted by J E Custom View Post
Like most people I like what I like.

From a strength stand point I would put a good laminate up against any other type and cost of stocks

Most of the precision rifles (Bench Rest are on Laminate stocks) They are very strong and very stable. Not believing hardly anything I hear, I decided to test the difference in stability.

I placed 4 different types of stocks on a concrete slab with a 20lb bag of shot on the butt stock and a dial indicator the same distance from the end of the but stock on the fore arm. I even shaded the dial indicators to prevent heat from effecting them.

After 30 minuets in the sun I found the most effected by heating on one side was the Tupperware (No big surprises) next was the all wood factory stock. (Different woods would probably have an effect on the warping amount.

Next was a High dollar composite. And the laminate had the least deflection of all of them.

I realize this was not a very scientific test but it did tell me what stock material was less effected
by uneven heat and was the most stable.

As far as strength, I have laminates on most of my Big bore rifles and have never had a failure.

All this aside , I like Laminates.

J E CUSTOM
I love wood, and for strength, durability and "practicool" you just can't beat the laminates. Other than some of the quality walnut that people like Joe will craft into a stock that is a pure work of art nothing looks better to me on a rifle than a brown tones or grey/black tones laminate.

If one wants to build a light weight mountain gun though that still has great strength it's time to step up to the high end composites.

The other place the good composite stocks beat all types of wood is changes in dimension with extreme cold, but they do not beat the laminates by much.
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Old 01-01-2014, 08:29 PM
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Re: # some rifle stocks better than others #

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel Russo View Post
A proper bedding of the barreled action into the laminate stock will give you worry free service over the life of the barrel...
In summary, a properly made and bedded laminated stock will suffice for a large caliber rifle.
That's good to know. I doubt that the laminate wood can cause cracks over time? Say 5 to 8 years?
If well cared, store in indoors, do I need to paint it every several years?
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Old 01-01-2014, 08:33 PM
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Re: # some rifle stocks better than others #

Quote:
Originally Posted by J E Custom View Post
From a strength stand point I would put a good laminate up against any other type and cost of stocks

Most of the precision rifles (Bench Rest are on Laminate stocks) They are very strong and very stable. Not believing hardly anything I hear, I decided to test the difference in stability.

Next was a High dollar composite. And the laminate had the least deflection of all of them.

As far as strength, I have laminates on most of my Big bore rifles and have never had a failure.

All this aside , I like Laminates.

J E CUSTOM
Impressive review based on your experience.
Are the laminate wood stock more heavier than high dollar composite on the same design?
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Old 01-01-2014, 10:05 PM
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Re: # some rifle stocks better than others #

Quote:
Originally Posted by No Fear in Accuracy View Post
That's good to know. I doubt that the laminate wood can cause cracks over time? Say 5 to 8 years?
If well cared, store in indoors, do I need to paint it every several years?
Laminated stocks should not crack over time if the blank used was properly glued up, and if it was properly finished when made. The final finish of the stock will seal the wood and protect it from the elements.

Just remember... The wood stock is only as good as the finish you put on it.
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  #14  
Old 01-08-2014, 11:19 PM
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Re: # some rifle stocks better than others #

Quote:
Originally Posted by No Fear in Accuracy View Post
Impressive review based on your experience.
Are the laminate wood stock more heavier than high dollar composite on the same design?
Yes; They are the heavy's of all the stocks. but with the wood grain running in many different directions they dampen the harmonics of firing, and with a good pillar bedding, They also absorb lots of sound and improve the balance of heavy barreled rifles.

Composites have there place, especially when trying to reduce the overall weight. but some opt for the light weight of the composite stock and then hang a 4 pound scope on it defeating the purpose.

As to the longevity of laminates; I have a match rifle that has fired over 20,000 rounds and is over 40 years old and it still looks and performs just as good with no failures, cracks or de-laminations.

This is another Chevy / ford debate and there will always be different opinions on which is best.

J E CUSTOM
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