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Pillar Beddin vs glass bedding

 
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  #1  
Old 02-06-2006, 11:42 PM
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Pillar Beddin vs glass bedding

I think ive got that right i kind of know what both are but dont understand what is more advantages, etc.

Thanks guys
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  #2  
Old 02-07-2006, 12:26 AM
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Re: Pillar Beddin vs glass bedding

The bedding allows to get an action without any stress and the pillars on top of that prevent the stock to get crunched by the pressure of the holding bolts. The pillars, instead of the stock, take the pressure from the mounting bolts .

Glass bedding also prevents any movement of the action in the stock as all the voids behind the recoil lug get fill by the epoxy.
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  #3  
Old 02-07-2006, 07:09 AM
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Re: Pillar Beddin vs glass bedding

Pillar bedding puts the receiver's firm, hard contact points only where the pillars are. Pillar bedding came about when synthetic stocks first came out and their filler in the receiver area was too soft. Conventional epoxy bedding in these soft-core stocks didn't have any support like hardwood so metal pillars had to be put in around the stock screws. So, the synthetic stock makers finally got around to putting hard filler in the receiver area. Pillars were no longer needed, but most folks still though those metal pillars had to be used; they couldn't understand why they were no longer needed.

Equally accurate rifles have been and still are being built with hardwood and synthetic stocks using conventional bedding without pillars. Putting an eighth of an inch of epoxy between the receiver and the stock works very well indeed as that puts contact all over the recever where the epoxy touches. Regardless of bedding type, you still have to loosen then retorque the stock screws before shooting it if best accuracy is your objective.

But the rage seems to be pillars. If the receiver isn't pillar bedded, most folks don't beleive it can shoot accurately. And it doesn't matter what evidence they uncover to the contrary. Nowadays, the biggest advantage of pillar bedding is it benefits the person getting paid to do it. They do more work and use more material then charge more money.
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Old 02-08-2006, 11:36 AM
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Re: Pillar Beddin vs glass bedding

Pillars are a good thing in soft stocks like Bell&Carlson and wood stocks , like it was mentioned if the stock bolts are torqued then it should be fine.
A proberly bedded stock made out of good material will be suffecient in 99% of the time.
The key to a good bedding job is making sure that the bedding is thick enough to have integrity I like to make mine at least 1/8" and I prefer to use the Brownells Steel Bed
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  #5  
Old 02-08-2006, 01:30 PM
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Re: Pillar Beddin vs glass bedding

You said you prefer the Brownells Steel Bed but have you ever try the "Marine-tex"? What do you think about it?
This is what McMillan is selling on its website for bedding. I guess it must work good for their stocks.

I am planning to do a pillar bedding job pretty soon and using this stuff and I don't know the pros and cons about it. If you know something about it, what will be your recommendations?

Thanks
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  #6  
Old 02-08-2006, 03:35 PM
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Re: Pillar Beddin vs glass bedding

I've used MarineTex with great results. It's popular with several match rifle builders. Devcon Plastic Steel is also great.

Years ago I did some tests with two flat steel surfaces held against two 1/8th inch ground pins. After applying release agent (Simonize car wax, rubbed very thin) to both surfaces, I filled the gap with a popular epoxy bedding agent, When they cured, I took 'em out and measured how thick the 1/8th inch thick pieces of cured epoxy were to determine how much they shrunk. Results are listed below; least shrinkage first:

1. Devcon Plastic Steel tied with MarineTex; less than .001 inch.
2. Bisonite, a bit over .001 inch.
3. Accraglas and one other brownish colored stuff I forget its name; a bit over .002-inch.
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  #7  
Old 02-08-2006, 11:38 PM
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Re: Pillar Beddin vs glass bedding

THanks guys.
Now that i understand ive got a oh sh*t question.

A friend of mine helped me change a stock out i had never done it before, he is a amiture gunsmith i guess is the best way to put it. He suggested that it be glass bedded and i said how much and then had him do.

Long story short. Am i screwed. Its a bell and carlson carbite savage 110 stock for a savage 116 300wm. SHould i have figured a way to pillar bed instead, the only reason why im worried is it was noted that bell and carlsons are use a soft compound. Its a new stock i can come up with more numbers if need.

Thanks guys.
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