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My First Rifle - finally made a decision

 
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  #8  
Old 05-21-2013, 02:35 PM
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Re: My First Rifle - finally made a decision

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Originally Posted by ntg View Post
Well...I'd say a Howa is a great gun. I have one in 22-250 and it's a solid, accurate shooter. They are basically the same action as the Vanguard. Weatherby doesn't just slap their name on anything. I'd say 25-06 is a good choice for deer...make sure you used a stout bullet if using it on elk, but it can take one, if the shot is placed right, etc. Good luck and keep up posted on how things go.
I just found some interesting info, perhaps you & others might be interestd in?
"Several American companies have used their actions. The current Weatherby Vanguard is a Howa.
Howa manufactures components for other firearm companies such as Mossberg, Smith & Wesson, and Weatherby."
So it would seem going directly to the source is a good thing.
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  #9  
Old 05-21-2013, 02:45 PM
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Re: My First Rifle - finally made a decision

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Originally Posted by Aldon View Post
http://www.longrangehunting.com/foru...9x40mm-114593/

The link above is to a decent 3x9 in the classifieds now.
As I have said, I know absolutely nothing about this issue as this is the first time I will own a rifle.
What is the difference between a 3.5-10x44 & a 3-9x40mm ?

Does the 3-9x40mm decrease the field of view where the 3.5-10x44 might show more of the background, around the deer/elk ?
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  #10  
Old 05-21-2013, 02:55 PM
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Re: My First Rifle - finally made a decision

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Originally Posted by Aldon View Post
http://www.longrangehunting.com/foru...9x40mm-114593/

The link above is to a decent 3x9 in the classifieds now.
I do appreciate your advice Aldon yet, if you add up everything cost-wise.
$364.99 + shipping($40) & FFL fees ($30), plus scope at $150 shipped
It seems that set-up would be putting me over the $600 mark.
Besides both items being USED rather than in the box & covered by a warranty.
Is it really worth that much to change my direction ?
I understand you are more experienced and knowledgeable about these matters.
I'm just trying to weigh all the pro's & Con's
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  #11  
Old 05-21-2013, 04:39 PM
ntg ntg is offline
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Re: My First Rifle - finally made a decision

Richard,

My Howa came with the Nikko Stirling Nighteater 3.5-10x42 scope on it. I got it figuring that I'd use it until I saved up for better. It really isn't a bad scope, and I have it on there still. It's probably better than most at the $150 range. It was optic of the year in Rifleman (or one of the NRA mags about 5 years ago, so that says something). It isn't as good as my Elite Limited Edition, or a few others I have, but its a good scope. I was out hunting yotes at around zero degrees this winter and the Nighteater was stiff in changing the power on it, but I don't know if others would have issue if it was that cold.

Keep in mind this is the Nikko Stirling Nighteater, and you’re looking at the Gameking, which I have no experience with. In my experience there's a lot of scopes being made in Asian countries that are very good compared to what they were producing 10 years ago.

Also, you asked on what the numbers mean. The numbers before the "x" are the magnification of the scope, so mine mentioned above will magnify from 3.5 to 10 power. The number after the "x" is the diameter of the objective lens. The size of this lens loosely dictates the amount of light transmitted into the scope. Lens coatings, number of lenses in the scope, etc. also play a part in light transmitted. Eye relief is a little more complicated as it has to do with the geometry of lens placement and other things. Field of view also is a factor of the objective lens and internal geometry, if I'm not mistaken. I don't worry a lot about field of view (FOV) for general hunting in a scope, as it doesn't really matter that you can see 15 feet less in width. Now FOV is a bigger deal in a spotting scope or binos as that is what you're scouting with and it will help in seeing more area, less movement of the head etc. I'm no expert in these things either, but I hope this helps.
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  #12  
Old 05-21-2013, 09:56 PM
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Re: My First Rifle - finally made a decision

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Originally Posted by ntg View Post
Richard,

My Howa came with the Nikko Stirling Nighteater 3.5-10x42 scope on it. I got it figuring that I'd use it until I saved up for better. It really isn't a bad scope, and I have it on there still. It's probably better than most at the $150 range. It was optic of the year in Rifleman (or one of the NRA mags about 5 years ago, so that says something). It isn't as good as my Elite Limited Edition, or a few others I have, but its a good scope. I was out hunting yotes at around zero degrees this winter and the Nighteater was stiff in changing the power on it, but I don't know if others would have issue if it was that cold.

Keep in mind this is the Nikko Stirling Nighteater, and you’re looking at the Gameking, which I have no experience with. In my experience there's a lot of scopes being made in Asian countries that are very good compared to what they were producing 10 years ago.

Also, you asked on what the numbers mean. The numbers before the "x" are the magnification of the scope, so mine mentioned above will magnify from 3.5 to 10 power. The number after the "x" is the diameter of the objective lens. The size of this lens loosely dictates the amount of light transmitted into the scope. Lens coatings, number of lenses in the scope, etc. also play a part in light transmitted. Eye relief is a little more complicated as it has to do with the geometry of lens placement and other things. Field of view also is a factor of the objective lens and internal geometry, if I'm not mistaken. I don't worry a lot about field of view (FOV) for general hunting in a scope, as it doesn't really matter that you can see 15 feet less in width. Now FOV is a bigger deal in a spotting scope or binos as that is what you're scouting with and it will help in seeing more area, less movement of the head etc. I'm no expert in these things either, but I hope this helps.
Thank you very much for explaining that for me.
This is my first time for ALL that is involved so, I have a lot of learning to do.
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  #13  
Old 05-21-2013, 10:48 PM
ntg ntg is offline
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Re: My First Rifle - finally made a decision

You're welcome. I never did comment on your question about caliber choice. I'm going to assume that your looking at factory ammo which plays into my response. First, if you can get a chance to fire a friends rifle that's in the caliber your considering it will help a lot as to if you feel you can handle it. If you intend to take on elk I'd really see about something that can shoot more bullet than the 25-06. I'm not saying it can't be done (I've seen it done w/ less), but the "comfort margin" isn't much. You've got to be able to shot in the kill zone for sure, becuase the lighter bullets won't do as well in general if bullet placement isn't ideal. I'd sugget the 7mm-08. It's got the option of 140-160gr. bullets and not going to kick as much as the 270 in similar bullet/rifle combos generally speaking. It's also very comparible in kill ability to the 270. Also, you can find some factory ammo for it in 120 bullet weights that will be even better on recoil and do the job for deer. Another thought, although cost is a challenge, is if shooting a decent bolt gun with a deer/elk caliber is too much for you then look into the semi-auto rifles. The action on them will take a lot of the recoil for you.

Best thing you could really do for yourself is see about shooting some guns (a friends, etc.) first to see how you, with your limits, handle it. And one more thing, depending on your disability, MT fish and game may allow you to hunt out of a truck or on a ATV. Fixing a vehicle with a gun mount will also reduce recoil if you're able to do that. Just some ideas and thoughts.
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  #14  
Old 05-21-2013, 10:57 PM
ntg ntg is offline
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Re: My First Rifle - finally made a decision

BTW...I was just looking on the Federal Premium Ammunition - Every Shot Counts website. They don't even suggest any of their 25-06 loads for elk if that's what you're aim is. Not that you can't do it...they use to us a 30-30 a century ago to do it, but like I said there's a small "comfort margin" in the 25-06 when your game is elk. If I was going that route with elk, I'd certainly get a stout bullet like the partition to give me a bit of an edge.
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