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MARKSMANSHIP BASICS - Prone position

 
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Old 09-03-2007, 09:44 AM
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MARKSMANSHIP BASICS - Prone position

#1 Please describe your optimum prone position for best accuracy in the field. Angling (30-45 degrees?) to target or torso in a straight line?

#2 Please describe the position of your feet - flat to ground or upright on an angle.

#3 Please describe, if you have not covered this in #1, the position of your elbows, head and neck.
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Old 09-03-2007, 06:55 PM
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Quote:
1 Please describe your optimum prone position for best accuracy in the field. Angling (30-45 degrees?) to target or torso in a straight line?
I normally use about a 15-20 degree body angle, but have been experimenting with no angle.

Quote:
#2 Please describe the position of your feet - flat to ground or upright on an angle.
The position of the feet is not as critical as the muscle tension. The feet must be still and the muscles must be relaxed so there is no movement nor tension transmitted to the upper body.

Quote:
#3 Please describe, if you have not covered this in #1, the position of your elbows, head and neck.
As I get older my neck complains bitterly about shooting prone. In all of the position issues this is the most critical for me. Trying to achieve a “relaxed” neck position is difficult. A good properly positioned check piece and a good rest under the rear of the stock help immensely. I try to have my head at the minimum angle off of vertical that gives me the correct eye relief. In shooting prone off of a bipod the preparation of the gun and the head is most critical for me. During repetitive shooting such as F-class, I am bad to let the gun get too far forward and not drag it back or crawl forward to it. Also my neck will be stiff and sore for days after a competition. Bear in mind that I am mostly just a “head up wing shooter” and that is how I approach a rifle too.

My elbows are positioned according to the gun and its recoil. If the gun has no recol then I keep the left elbow closer to me to help support the head.
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Old 09-04-2007, 12:46 PM
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#1 Please describe your optimum prone position for best accuracy in the field. Angling (30-45 degrees?) to target or torso in a straight line?

Torso in a straight line. Shot lots of small banana shaped groups out of large cartridge braked rifles until torso in straight line was pointed out to me. For smaller cartrigde non-braked rifle I go the angle route.

#2 Please describe the position of your feet - flat to ground or upright on an angle.

Feet wide spread and toes down, relaxed. Heals usually end up pointed out.

#3 Please describe, if you have not covered this in #1, the position of your elbows, head and neck.
Took a lot of fiddling with the length of bipod legs (fixed length legs) to get it correct for up and down angle shots. This was key to not having to follow range sessions with chiropractor visits.

Shooting mat lined up with target. (Aids in torso straight behind rifle.) Rifle on bipod and rear beanie bag. Natural point of aim achieved. Things are steady as a rock. Palm swell/pistol grip/thumb hole indexes the trigger hand followed by the elbow. Elbow position width wise influenced by beanie bag height (up/down angle). Off elbow positioned 'naturally' based on other elbow. Hand adjusting beanie bag height (shouldn't be much) Delicate cheek weld. Proper 'squeeze' of bottom three fingers and thumb. Gently back off of touching the rifle except for cheek weld. Natural POI still spot on. Slip back in to position. Inform spotter, control breathing, see impact, break out the the skinning knife after the 2 hour walk over to the POI.
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Old 09-04-2007, 08:58 PM
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#1 Please describe your optimum prone position for best accuracy in the field. Angling (30-45 degrees?) to target or torso in a straight line?
Guessing I would say my body angling lees than 45 degrees. Depends on which rifle and the terrain and time I have to prepare.

#2 Please describe the position of your feet - flat to ground or upright on an angle.
Generally left foot extended and right foot pulled up close to my left knee.

#3 Please describe, if you have not covered this in #1, the position of your elbows, head and neck.
My right elbow is extended about 90degrees to the butt of the rifle and my left elbow is generally extended outward towards the target so that I can support the rear bag or rest. Head and neck aligned to get a full sight picture in the scope.
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Old 07-11-2011, 05:16 AM
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Re: MARKSMANSHIP BASICS - Prone position

I know that this is an old thread, but here it goes.

#1 Please describe your optimum prone position for best accuracy in the field. Angling (30-45 degrees?) to target or torso in a straight line?

Last I knew military was teaching straight line of mat and weapon and body. it helps keep that natural POA in a good direction, maintain consistency and most importantly of all absorb recoil.

#2 Please describe the position of your feet - flat to ground or upright on an angle.

Call it toes out and heels in. Relaxed to reduce movement.

#3 Please describe, if you have not covered this in #1, the position of your elbows, head and neck.

Elbows what ever is most comfortable so I can hold for a long period of time for the right shot, usually a bit out and I am controlling the back of the stock with my left hand. head and neck near vertical it is a bit uncomfortable after a very long time but if you are looking through the scope for two hours I am sure any position would get tiring. Usually at the range is when i get the worst crick but occasionally in the field when the target and wind are not cooperating.
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Old 07-20-2011, 05:57 PM
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Re: MARKSMANSHIP BASICS - Prone position

I never had a dad but I had a brother who shared his father inlaw.I was 10 and was hunting with this old man's side, he was in his late 70s, he had friends of one had left me an old Springfield
03 and this old guy could shoot, he would shoot 8oz tomato and oj cans at 100 yards just to make me want to learn to shoot. He trained soldures how to shoot in the 1st and second WW.
You learn to point the rifle, hold it on a spot for 5 seconds and let your rifle down and than do it all over hold it for over 5 seconds after you have learned to hold it propler extend the distance and keep doing this you learn how to point and not let your barrel dance. If you can get on target in one second you got it.
I saw this 92 year old man pick off those cans one after another at 100 yards at least 12 times.
I listen and I learned...thats how I filled so many Deer tags over the years.
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Old 08-30-2012, 06:18 PM
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Re: MARKSMANSHIP BASICS - Prone position

The several snipers in my family stressed that the important part in prone is that the rifle is on your shoulder correctly and your eye can get into the scope. For my narrow shoulder and neck that doesn't like strange angles in long holds, I'm just off from straight on, maybe 4 to 5 degrees.

My elbows make the best triangulation the ground will let me, but the tension comes from the shooting harness. I mostly relax. When hunting, I try to use a really tall sandbag up front, if prone, and if the terrain allows. A sneaker insole makes a good elbow pad.

I do like to cheat a booster pad under my hips because I tend to take a large breath.

I have always liked having my big toes touching the ground with my heels up. My feet point down almost 60 degrees. If I'm tilted on the slope, I spread my legs as necessary, trying to build a good brace. I don't trust my muscles to brace, it should be relaxed, and against the bones.
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