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How to Wash Dishes

 
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  #1  
Old 11-21-2007, 10:22 PM
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How to Wash Dishes

Washing the dishes is necessary in order to have dishes to cook with and to eat out of. This appears to be a mystery to some people who are used to their wife or their Momma doing everything for them. These people like to think of themselves as men but in reality they are simply dependants who have no ability to care for themselves. So for all of you men who canít take care of yourselves, here is how you wash dishes.

1. When you get back from the morning hunt, look and see if there is water in the dish washing bucket and if not then take the bucket to the stream and fill it up.

2. Survey the dirty pots and pans and select a two or three quart pan and pour a couple of cups of water in one and put a squirt or so of dishwashing liquid in there. Heat it over the stove until it is steaming but not to boiling.

3. While the water is heating take all the dishes and rinse and wipe them out so most of the food is gone.

4. Take the heated water and pour a little in some of the dirtier pots and dishes and add cold water to each so that it is still hot water but you can put your hand in it.

5. Take a paper towel, sponge, scrubbing pad and clean the pots and dishes that have the warm soapy water in them. Discard the water.

6. Take the less dirty dishes and put them in the pot with the hot water and add enough cold water to be able to tolerate the temperature and then clean them with a paper towel or cloth.

7. Discard the dirty soapy water.

8. Rinse all dishes with clean water and set to dry.

At this point the dishes will be ready for use in the evening when you get back from hunting and you will not have to wash dishes in the dark.
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Old 11-22-2007, 12:47 AM
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Yep, that's what he does.;)
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Old 11-22-2007, 02:20 AM
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That's a whole bunch of great info I hope to never need. I had to do my own grocery shoppin' a while back. Awful, awful day! Figured that out though. Found a pretty clerk and gave her my list. Basket filled itself up by magic. Kind of like the dishes at home.
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  #4  
Old 11-22-2007, 06:33 AM
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Location: Dogpatch, NY
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Cold Water

I prefer cold water for doing the camp dishes. Fast, saves ya the fire wood that would be used to heat the water and is easier on your hands.
After breakfast just leave your dishes along with any dirty pots and pans where cold water can get at em. When ya get back in after a hards days hunt they're clean and shiney.
Gotta go now, time to take "Cold Water" for his morning walk.
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Old 11-22-2007, 07:43 AM
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I'd rather pony my way over to the nearest diner. They are more than happy to take care of these messy little details. I'm more than happy to leave the little gal a nice tip and go hunting again. :>)
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  #6  
Old 11-22-2007, 11:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Varmint Hunter View Post
I'd rather pony my way over to the nearest diner. They are more than happy to take care of these messy little details. I'm more than happy to leave the little gal a nice tip and go hunting again. :>)
It was 4 hours round trip to the nearest "decent" diner.

There was one better than an hour away but their pies looked awful.
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Old 11-27-2007, 10:06 PM
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How to build a Fire

Fire has been around for many years and is a pretty well know commodity. In the national forest it is regulated by the Forest Service because there are people who do not know much about fires. You are required to have a shovel and bucket if you build a fire and you cannot leave it unattended. Building a fire is requires large initial inputs of hard work and then decreasing amounts of work.

Build a Fire Ring
1. Select the site for your fire.
2. Gather some large stones and build a fire ring.
3. Take a shovel or spade and dig up the grass all around the fire rings so the fire cannot get to an outside fuel source.

Get some firewood

This part requires hours of hard work and some knowledge of firewood. You will need different sizes of firewood from small twigs for kindling up through medium limbs to split logs and finally a few whole log sections.

1. Select a dead tree.
2. Get the chainsaw and mix the gas and oil together and pour it into the tank.
3. Crank up the chainsaw and cut down the tree so it falls clear.
4. Trim the tree limbs off and carry them to the location you will keep your firewood
5. Cut the tree into 18 inch sections and carry them to the campsite.
6. Find some smaller trees that will have a good supply of small limbs and kindling and cut them and take them to the campsite.
7. Get you a log for a chopping block and chop up the limbs and sort them into different sizes.
8. Grab a maul and split some of the logs up into halves or quarters depending on the diameter.
9. Get the axe and cut up the smaller trees and limbs into kindling.

At this time you are through with the really hard sweaty work and the rest is easier.

Lay the fire

Because of the rule of not leaving a fire unattended I only build one fire a day and that is in the evening. It is easier to lay the fire when you get back from the morning hunt than to try and do it at night when it is dark. It is also faster to have the fire already laid so when you come back to camp at night you only have to start it and can get right to cooking dinner. Some people have elaborate rituals and believe that wood must be stacked in some precise manner but I am not one of those people. Laying a fire takes about 15 minutes and is not hard work but it is till work.

1. Get some small kindling from the firewood pile and place it in the fire ring.
2. Get some slightly larger limbs and place these on top of the kindling
3. Get about three to five medium limbs and place on top of the pile
4. Spilt a quarter log a few times and put this on top.
5. Get three or four quarters of halves and place on top of that.


Start the Fire

In the evening when you get back from hunting it will be dark and cold. You need to put your gear away and make a few switches and changes of gear according to what you will need to do in the morning. Then you can start your fire. If you are not lazy then your fire will have been laid at noon and sitting there in the fire ring ready to be started. At this point in a day I am usually tired and have little patience with stupidity nor laziness. I want my fire and I want it right now. Now starting a fire is not very much work at all but if a person has terminal laziness they will not start a fire.

1. Get an empty tin can and pour it half full of Coleman fuel.
2. Pour the fuel onto the wood so it gets to the kindling. You do not want most of it on the larger material as you need to use the kindling for its intended purpose.
3. Step back and throw a lighted match onto the wood that is soaked with lantern fuel.

You have now started your fire with less than a minute of effort and can go get a beer and start cooking dinner if you have not been lazy and failed to wash the dishes.

Maintenance

Every few days you will need to check to see how your supply of firewood is holding out and gather more as needed. You may need to split more of the logs into halves and quarters. This is moderately hard work but you donít have to do very much of it very often.
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