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Bipods on hard surfaces?

 
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  #8  
Old 07-19-2014, 12:44 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Vernal Utah
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Re: Bipods on hard surfaces?

[Once I'm satisfied on the bench I simply drop down to prone (my most likely shooting position on my hunt) and compare/practice and make any necessary adjustments as required. [/QUOTE]

My range is covered in gravel, which is just another unrealistic surface that you would shooting off of in the field.

I see some P-dog sniping in my 25-06's future before the bipod is trusted again.
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  #9  
Old 07-19-2014, 12:48 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Long Island, New York
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Re: Bipods on hard surfaces?

I've taken hundreds & hundreds of longrange shots off a Harris bi-pod while in the field. Groundhogs were the primary targets and the results were generally very good. The ground is probably just as hard as a bench top and while a sandbag may have been preferable the bi-pod has always worked well for hunting.
BTW - I shoot a 338 RUM off the bi-pod while in a sitting position and shoot accurately out to 300yds. This combination will easily put you in the vitals of game animals every time if you practice.
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  #10  
Old 07-19-2014, 01:02 PM
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Re: Bipods on hard surfaces?

Quote:
Originally Posted by HNDLDR View Post
[Once I'm satisfied on the bench I simply drop down to prone (my most likely shooting position on my hunt) and compare/practice and make any necessary adjustments as required.
Quote:
My range is covered in gravel, which is just another unrealistic surface that you would shooting off of in the field.

I see some P-dog sniping in my 25-06's future before the bipod is trusted again.
Use a mat of some sort between you and the gravel; i.e., shooting mat (can be pricey), sleeping bag, sleeping bag rest, blankets, or combinations, etc ...or whatever it takes for you to get comfy.
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Last edited by FEENIX; 07-19-2014 at 01:50 PM.
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  #11  
Old 07-19-2014, 03:22 PM
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Re: Bipods on hard surfaces?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FEENIX View Post
I personally do not have any problem with it. Once I'm satisfied on the bench I simply drop down to prone (my most likely shooting position on my hunt) and compare/practice and make any necessary adjustments as required.
I certainly agree.
I use a bipod for hunting and for tactical competition. Mine is a Harris HBRMS and the only adjustment I've had to make on target is its tendancy to shoot a little high from a solid platform like a concrete bench. A carpet between the bipod legs and the concrete helps mitigate some of that. The remainder of the surfaces on the competition range are gravel and the bipod works quite well there, when properly used. I once thought the gravel was causing me difficulty but when I saw that there are other shooters who can put five rounds into a 3 inch groujp at 600 yards from the same gravel I have to work with I changed my mind.
I don't use the bipod for load development. A good quality rest works better in that category. But when the load is ready to face the competitive or game hunting world I finish polishing my skills with that "perfect" load from the bipod.
In tactical competition we have one position that requires resting the bipod (or whatever rest is allowed) on concrete but with a little practice I've been able to compensate for the difference in trajectory quite easily.
I've found that some shooters who may be new to the world of shooting from a bipod get frustrated and simply abandon it; an unfortunate decision. Shooters who are new to bipod use typically find they need to learn the peculiarities of the bipod and how to use it effectively. Loading the bipod works for some but not for others. Shoulder hold with a bipod can make a huge difference. Placement of the non-shooting arm and hand can also affect results.
If you're new to shooting keep this in mind. There are a large number of shooters who immediately blame their load or their equipment when the results on target are disappointing. Too few shooters understand that the first suspect should always be the shooter him or herself. Working on form, timing, etc. will cure most shooting accuracy problems.
I've been told that the only difference between puppies and shooters is that puppies stop whining after about six months. I've come to believe that statement has merit.
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  #12  
Old 07-20-2014, 08:22 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 245
Re: Bipods on hard surfaces?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FearNoWind View Post
I certainly agree.
I use a bipod for hunting and for tactical competition. Mine is a Harris HBRMS and the only adjustment I've had to make on target is its tendancy to shoot a little high from a solid platform like a concrete bench. A carpet between the bipod legs and the concrete helps mitigate some of that. The remainder of the surfaces on the competition range are gravel and the bipod works quite well there, when properly used. I once thought the gravel was causing me difficulty but when I saw that there are other shooters who can put five rounds into a 3 inch groujp at 600 yards from the same gravel I have to work with I changed my mind.
I don't use the bipod for load development. A good quality rest works better in that category. But when the load is ready to face the competitive or game hunting world I finish polishing my skills with that "perfect" load from the bipod.
In tactical competition we have one position that requires resting the bipod (or whatever rest is allowed) on concrete but with a little practice I've been able to compensate for the difference in trajectory quite easily.
I've found that some shooters who may be new to the world of shooting from a bipod get frustrated and simply abandon it; an unfortunate decision. Shooters who are new to bipod use typically find they need to learn the peculiarities of the bipod and how to use it effectively. Loading the bipod works for some but not for others. Shoulder hold with a bipod can make a huge difference. Placement of the non-shooting arm and hand can also affect results.
If you're new to shooting keep this in mind. There are a large number of shooters who immediately blame their load or their equipment when the results on target are disappointing. Too few shooters understand that the first suspect should always be the shooter him or herself. Working on form, timing, etc. will cure most shooting accuracy problems.
I've been told that the only difference between puppies and shooters is that puppies stop whining after about six months. I've come to believe that statement has merit.
I mimic FearNoWind's post to a TEE. I've been thru and have done and do just as he explains. I learned years back not to pre-load your bi-pod simply because most of the shooting situations you will be in will not allow it. I found this to be true in every Tac Match I ever shot. I use a Harris on my Tac rifle and a Werks Bi-Pod on my FTR rifle. I like the line that Clint said in Heartbreak Ridge, Adapt, Improvise, Overcome, with enough patience and practice all things become second nature.
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  #13  
Old 07-21-2014, 10:29 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Dallas,OR
Posts: 346
Re: Bipods on hard surfaces?

Here is a little tidbit that I learned on this forum. I use the Harris leg notch models and it's very important to have the legs set at the first notch or higher. There is about a 1/2 to 3/4 inch movement from the leg springs that can cause accuracy issues.
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  #14  
Old 07-23-2014, 01:05 AM
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Re: Bipods on hard surfaces?

I guess my views are in contrast with naysayers. I include my Harris bipods combined with a rear monopod in nearly all of my shooting, and I'm a happy enough there.
I use the tallest swivel model(S-25 I think), and can usually take sitting shots over high grass if I have to.

I use benchrests for hot load development, and go to bipod for cold development.
Off a bench I stack a couple carpet squares to setup on. works fine.
I don't preload, because I don't shoulder stocks, but shoot free recoil. That's where the rear monopod comes into play for me. This works provided the load is developed with it.

An advantage to LR hunting is that you don't have to take shots wherever you happen to be when opportunity first presents. LRH is not skeet.
You can move to a spot for bipod/higher-percentage shooting, even if further away,, or another day.
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