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Very useful tool ...

 
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  #85  
Old 09-19-2013, 10:48 AM
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Location: Gillette, WY
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Re: Very useful tool ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SidecarFlip View Post
Gotta be careful with diesel too. The gummit mandate removed all the sulfur from diesel so it's lost it's lubricating quality. Consequently, the micro honed surfaces in your injection pump suffer and the injector pintles tend to gall, plus B20 is crap. I don't ever use bio-diesel, made that mistake one time. Problem is, once you have it (algae), it's hard to kill.


I use Caterpillar fuel additive in my storage tank and in my diesel pickup, a little bit goes a longh way and it adds the lost from deletion of sulfur, lubrication. It actually pays for itself (retail is around 34 bucks a quart). It increases your fuel mileage a bit because it raises the cetane rating of the fuel too.


Been heating with corn for at least 10 years now.
.
I know what you're saying. With ULSD I wonder how many more 500k+ mile diesels we'll be seeing. Bio-Diesel just seems to be a bad idea made worse. We'd have to be a much different place in the world before I consider using it. I've been driving diesel trucks for the better part of a decade. Only gelled once (using power service of all things). Nothing but Howes for me (had good luck with Powerdyne too). I haven't had the chance to use the CAT stuff, with all the heavy equipment we have here that surprises me.


t
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  #86  
Old 09-19-2013, 11:12 AM
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Re: Very useful tool ...

I'm sold on the Cat additive. We are certified Cummins, Cat, DDEC and MB and yellow motors are everywhere in our shop. Mostly head gaskets and spacer plates and ocassional exhaust manifold studs.

The new generation diesels run way hotter with the DEF and the reburn and emissions costs are about 20 grand extra on a Class 8 on road diesel.

Thats why you see more ceramics in diesel engines now and why the newer trucks have huge grills and the cabs are mounted higher.... They need additional airflow to get rid of the heat. The catalyist reburn system runs at 1500 degrees when it cycles to burn off the accumulated soot and NOX.

All the manufacturers have degraded their engine warranties except Cummins but Cummins charges an exhorbinant up front price for the extended warranty...they all know that the engines aren't going to last the old school million miles.

Some don't even last a month. We had a string of DDEC's that puked before a month went by. They were lined up in the shop on engine stands like tombstones and Detroit couldn't keep up with replacement engines.

Found a nice (non-authorized) use for DEF. I use it to fertilize hay fields. Nothing but 32% Urea and deionized water and it's cheaper (per gallon) than 28 agricultrial urea and it's easier to handle in 2.5 gallon jugs.
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  #87  
Old 09-19-2013, 11:18 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 436
Re: Very useful tool ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SidecarFlip View Post
People mistake Titewad and Titegroup often. Titewad is shotgun propellant.

No headache here. Just pollen issues.
Nope, no mistake here. I've been seeing titegroup and lil' gun everywhere. Damn hard to find the H1000 I'm after, but I ran into some on Saturday. It's in my cabinet now
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  #88  
Old 09-19-2013, 11:35 AM
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Re: Very useful tool ...

The company I work for has had enormous problems with Dodge/Cummins/DEF/DPF & warranty issues. Quite simply, they won't warranty chit. If they do we still have to drag the truck (which is usually dead or in limp mode) off of some remote location hours from town.

It MAY have gotten to the point of removal of certain "environmental" exhaust products before the vehicle was allowed to leave city limits. It was that bad. Now, they just simply don't buy diesels unless necessary.

Used to be, buy a diesel truck, fuel was cheaper, got better mileage & lasted longer. Not so anymore.


t
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  #89  
Old 09-19-2013, 12:43 PM
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Re: Very useful tool ...

You can't disable the emissions because everything is electronically controlled, no more mechanical injection pumps. It's even in farm tractors. JD is now using DEF on Tier 4 compliant engines and everyone will soon follow suit.

Engines have become so complex that mechanics aren't mechanics anymore, they are technicians. You can't diagnose an engine malfunction without plugging into the ECM connector and downloading the data to the manufacturer who, in turn, tells the technician what to replace-repair.

The new Detroit's actually have a set of LED lights on the fuel filter cannister that monitor engine sensor outputs. All green, good to go. Any red... take it to the shop, maybe on a hook if it derates or won't fire.

Our spate of puked Detroits was because of a porous head casting, the porosity allowed engine oil to mix with the extended life coolant. When you mix lube oil with extended life SCA coolant, the coolant turns to mud. The coolant sensors can't detect coolant flow, only temperature so the coolant wasn't circulating but the 'mud' around the sensor was within operating temperature so no fault occured. The engines basically ate themselves internally. They ran until they either spun a bearing or got so hot they destroyed the overhead. Best part was you can't purge the block of the 'mud' so they were all junk and they stunk from getting so hot. Detroit finally came in and took all of them, I presume to a scrap yard after they removed external components like alternators and such.

They sat in the shop with plastic sheets under the engine stands so the leaking, stinking 'mud' wouldn't wind up on the floor.

I believe all of Detroit's casting is done offshore. All the reman Cat stuff (in on road engines) is offshore, India, if I remember correctly. Cat is out of the on road business entirely due to their not being able to meet the Tier 4 requirements but we still do warranty work on on road and off road application.

I've never been impressed with a Dodge, not from the engine standpoint but from the component standpoint. Chryslers quality control is basically non-existent but thats another story. Best thing Chrysler did to the diesel lineup was getting rid of the 727 Torqueflite. That box can't take the torque and they were actually exploding.

I have a '97 7.3 Navistar ina 350 4x4 OBS.

In order of revelance pertaining to QC, it's Honda, then Nissan then Ford then GM then Chrysler and despite all the advertising blather, Honda and Nissan are still light years ahead of the not so big 3 and both Honda and Nissan are continually pro-active with their suppliers. The others care less.

They all make mistakes and they all have issues because a vehicle is made up of complex assemblies and parts and sometimes things fail.

You see, I work (part time) for a division of the second largest producer of flat rolled high strength steel sheet in the country and they are real big into automotive so I get some interesting insights into the steel end as well.
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  #90  
Old 09-19-2013, 02:40 PM
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Re: Very useful tool ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SidecarFlip View Post
You can't disable the emissions because everything is electronically controlled, no more mechanical injection pumps.

I've never been impressed with a Dodge, not from the engine standpoint but from the component standpoint. Chryslers quality control is basically non-existent but thats another story. Best thing Chrysler did to the diesel lineup was getting rid of the 727 Torqueflite. That box can't take the torque and they were actually exploding.

I have a '97 7.3 Navistar ina 350 4x4 OBS.

In order of revelance pertaining to QC, it's Honda, then Nissan then Ford then GM then Chrysler and despite all the advertising blather, Honda and Nissan are still light years ahead of the not so big 3 and both Honda and Nissan are continually pro-active with their suppliers. The others care less.


You see, I work (part time) for a division of the second largest producer of flat rolled high strength steel sheet in the country and they are real big into automotive so I get some interesting insights into the steel end as well.

I beg to differ, it is quite simple remove the emissions systems from most diesel pickups, it's not particularly difficult, just reprogram the computer; keep in mind, I do not work with heavy equipment & cannot comment there. It's also not difficult to understand why an entity would pay money to void their manufacturers warranty completely, because simply, Chrysler nor Cummins wouldn't warranty anything anyway. Might as well make your vehicles efficient & actually reliable, especially when you have a thousand or so running around the country.

Most of our Dodge trucks where so poorly designed that they maintained their own maintenance intervals. First it was rear ends, constantly, some tranny issues on the diesels. But the biggest was new front ends every 20k-30k miles, just like clockwork, every truck. The newer ones are holding up better, so far.

The DEF system is working much better as we can actually idle our vehicles without going into limp mode & hobbling back to town at 20-25mph with a plugged DPF. They also get a LOT better fuel mileage.

Ah, the good ole 7.3 back when diesels still made noise one of the better engines ever made. I see yours is the pre-intercooler model. The 4R-100 tranny wasn't exactly known for it's holding power either

I'm nearly 3yrs into a 6.7L SuperDuty I ran the 6.0 Navistar for 4yrs before that (gotta love torque-to-yield head studs) . So far so good, I don't refill my DPF tank nearly as often as I originally thought & it's pretty dern cheap. Mileage is getting better as the mileage increases (thank god) & she's treating me well.

Some of my cohorts were running the first version of DEF operated Duramax' & had some issues with the DEF tank freezing & breaking the sensor off. The truck won't move it that happens; you know it's a good day when your brand new truck gets towed out of your driveway!


t
__________________
"I, however, view ethics as an individual decision. My ethics are mine - and I won't explain or justify them to anyone else. I seek nobody's approval, just that of my own conscience. "

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  #91  
Old 09-19-2013, 03:17 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: S.E. Michigan
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Re: Very useful tool ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Outlaw6.0 View Post
I beg to differ, it is quite simple remove the emissions systems from most diesel pickups, it's not particularly difficult, just reprogram the computer; keep in mind, I do not work with heavy equipment & cannot comment there. It's also not difficult to understand why an entity would pay money to void their manufacturers warranty completely, because simply, Chrysler nor Cummins wouldn't warranty anything anyway. Might as well make your vehicles efficient & actually reliable, especially when you have a thousand or so running around the country.

I'm referring to pre-Tier 4 engines. The Tier 4 compliant engines aren't easy to disable, especially the DEF and Catalytic (DPF) convertor/soot trap engines because the engine controls interface with the emissions controls. I can comment. I'm glad in a way that the soot trap convertor thing is gone. Replacing the element and cleaning it constitutes a 20 grand machine and the residue is hazardous waste to boot and if you don't change the filter/element, it pushes the cannister apart and you replace the whole cannister and it ain't cheap.

Most of our Dodge trucks where so poorly designed that they maintained their own maintenance intervals. First it was rear ends, constantly, some tranny issues on the diesels. But the biggest was new front ends every 20k-30k miles, just like clockwork, every truck. The newer ones are holding up better, so far.

The DEF system is working much better as we can actually idle our vehicles without going into limp mode & hobbling back to town at 20-25mph with a plugged DPF. They also get a LOT better fuel mileage.

Mileage is relative. Comparing pre emissions diesels to post emissions is like comparing a silk purse to a sows ear. The DEF engine will still derate if the electronics sense a malfunction in the emissions system.

Ah, the good ole 7.3 back when diesels still made noise one of the better engines ever made. I see yours is the pre-intercooler model. The 4R-100 tranny wasn't exactly known for it's holding power either

I don't have a 4R. I have a built by SVO, Dearborn E4-OD. It has everything that could be put in, put in plus a huge sump pan and 2 Hayden Trans coolers. Mine is fully modified with everything Banks makes, new turbo, air-to-air high capacity injection pump turbo delete pedestal, full K&N Cold air intake plus the trans and engine is chipped, not radically, just a little to the tune of 375 RWHP on our dyno at work. I get 22 empty and 17 pulling the gooseneck. I have a Detroit Tru-Track out back and an ARB up front and it will incenerate the tires no problem, just not my thing. I built it to pull loads. It's 7 over stock with a shackle reversal up front and all the suspension pivots ride on greasable roller bearings. Everyone around here wants to buy it. It's never seen snow and has just 89,000 miles on the clock. It's a Lariat 4 door long bed. Not for sale, I can't afford a new one.

I'm nearly 3yrs into a 6.7L SuperDuty I ran the 6.0 Navistar for 4yrs before that (gotta love torque-to-yield head studs) . So far so good, I don't refill my DPF tank nearly as often as I originally thought & it's pretty dern cheap. Mileage is getting better as the mileage increases (thank god) & she's treating me well.

Some of my cohorts were running the first version of DEF operated Duramax' & had some issues with the DEF tank freezing & breaking the sensor off. The truck won't move it that happens; you know it's a good day when your brand new truck gets towed out of your driveway!

32% urea (DEF) freezes to a slush at 32 degrees. All the DEF systems are supposed to back purge the associated plumbing of DEF on shutdown and engine coolant is circulated through the tank to warm the DEF to liquid asap. The electronics aren't supposed to allow DEF injection until the DEF reaches a pre-set temperature, usually 45 degrees. Thats why when you shut your truck off, you hear interesting sounds. It's the purge pump evacuating the supply lines.


t
The EPA removed the fiddle factor when they went to Tier 4 standards.
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