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View Poll Results: Should NON lead bullets be more widely used in hunting situations?
Yes 1 3.85%
No 24 92.31%
Maybe 1 3.85%
More research should be done 0 0%
Voters: 26. You may not vote on this poll

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Should firearm safety also include the material of the projectile being used?

 
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  #1  
Old 03-16-2009, 09:22 AM
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Should firearm safety also include the material of the projectile being used?

I have been watching different vids today and I came across these 3 videos which I found rather interesting. I always wondered about bullet fragmentation and the effects of lead and lead poisoning. I personally shoot copper bullets NOT because lead was ever a health concern but because my rifles shot them very accurately. My kids eat venison, I eat venison, my GF (whos pregnant) eats venison and I personally feel more at ease using a lead free bullet especially after watching these vids. I am NOT an advocate for ANY of the copper bullet manufacturers but I am a concerned father and hunter.

YouTube - Copper vs Lead Bullet Study pt 1

YouTube - Copper vs Lead Bullet Fragmentation Study pt 2

YouTube - Copper vs Lead Bullet Fragmentation Study pt 3
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Last edited by Southernfryedyankee; 03-16-2009 at 09:26 AM.
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  #2  
Old 03-16-2009, 09:38 AM
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Re: Should firearm safety also include the material of the projectile being used?

I am not at all convinced that lead bullets pose any hazard to those eating biggame meat. The only reason to choose a projectile is it's effectiveness (accuracy and downrange performance).

This is a slippery slope. I wish I had a dollar for every time I've been eating a rabbit, pheasant, grouse, quail or dove and had to spit out a piece of shot.

I spent the vast majority of my childhood with a couple lead sinkers (the kind you pinch on/off the line) in my mouth while fishing for trout. Nobody ever told me anything about the 'dangers'. Even after all this poisoning etc., I still received a BS in Mathematics/computer Science and routinely scored between 135-140 on IQ tests in College.

Just my not so humble opinion,
AJ
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Old 03-16-2009, 12:53 PM
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Re: Should firearm safety also include the material of the projectile being used?

The studies are very interesting. Yes I do use lead bullets - as I shoot them up I will make the switch to copper - not because I am concerned with lead - I just believe that at some point we will not have an option - just like lead shot for waterfowl hunting. I think it should remain a choice. I see it as just another way for the anti hunting/gun people to slowly eat away at our rights from yet another angle.

I was sitting at a stoplight this afternoon. My light turned green - I did not move until 6 other vehicles had run their red light. It is quite common to see vehicles running lights on a daily basis.
Which poses more of a threat? Lead bullets or cars running lights? MN had installed cameras at many intersections to photo and ticket these vehicles - only to have it ruled unconstitutional and had them removed. Do you think that they will treat your 2nd amendment rights the same way?

Sorry for the ranting and raving.

Last edited by MN Hunter; 03-16-2009 at 01:03 PM.
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Old 03-16-2009, 09:15 PM
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Re: Should firearm safety also include the material of the projectile being used?

I think this is all a bunch of crap. I've been hunting and eating game I've shot, casting bullets and so on. I still don't have any significant lead levels in my body.
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Old 03-17-2009, 08:46 AM
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Re: Should firearm safety also include the material of the projectile being used?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AJ Peacock View Post
I am not at all convinced that lead bullets pose any hazard to those eating biggame meat. The only reason to choose a projectile is it's effectiveness (accuracy and downrange performance).

This is a slippery slope. I wish I had a dollar for every time I've been eating a rabbit, pheasant, grouse, quail or dove and had to spit out a piece of shot.

I spent the vast majority of my childhood with a couple lead sinkers (the kind you pinch on/off the line) in my mouth while fishing for trout. Nobody ever told me anything about the 'dangers'. Even after all this poisoning etc., I still received a BS in Mathematics/computer Science and routinely scored between 135-140 on IQ tests in College.

Just my not so humble opinion,


AJ

Aj, I had to grin when I read your post. I used to do the same thing with the split shot. Load a bunch in the mouth and head to the creek to go fishing for the day.

I was a little stupid in my late teens, but seemed to recover in my later years. I don't know if a guy can have lead poisoning for a while and recover later.

On a serious note, no lead bullets, I beleive, are going to be the future.

Steve
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  #6  
Old 03-17-2009, 09:14 AM
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Re: Should firearm safety also include the material of the projectile being used?

There are fragments of most any projectile in the damaged area at the wound
site no mater what material is used .

But who eats this meat !!!! ( No one because it is blood shot and is removed during
processing ).

I was brought up in the country eating every thing that could be killed and many times
I would come across a shotgun pellet in a squirrel or a bird and I'm pushing 70 so it
must not be that bad .

We should fight this because it takes away your choices and once you have no choice
the price goes up and if you want to hunt you will pay more and shoot less.

Before the steel shot Debacle we had great duck hunting and lost very few birds to
wounding. once steel was forced on us the loss rate was 25 to 50% of the birds and
the price of shells went from 5 or 6 dollars to 12 to 15 dollars a box.

Now in order to get the same results of lead shot you can pay $38.00 for 10 shells.

Bullets should be picked based on there performance NOT there composition .

Just my opinion
J E CUSTOM
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  #7  
Old 10-16-2012, 05:58 PM
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Re: Should firearm safety also include the material of the projectile being used?

I asked a close friend of mine about this 2yrs ago I think it was. He explained what the deal was with lead shot and water (water foul hunting), and what has to happen. In laymans term lead had to change it's form I believe he said it needed to oxidize before it could be taken by a digestive tract readily enough to get sufficient amounts to cause harm. He stressed that the harm was significant. but lead from a bullet in bigame never has the chance to change forms so in short it wouldn't stay in your digestive tract long enough for your body to absorb enough to worry about even over years.

I would really like to have just quoted his words but the guy is also an ex marine lol
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Keep in mind the animals we shoot for food and display are not bullet proof. Contrary to popular belief, they bleed and die just like they did a hundred years ago. Being competent with a given rifle is far more important than impressive ballistics and poor shootability. High velocity misses never put a steak in the freezer.

Joe
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